1983–84 FA Cup

The 1983–84 FA Cup was the 103rd season of the world's oldest football knockout competition, The Football Association Challenge Cup, or FA Cup. The competition was won by Everton, who defeated finalists Watford 2–0 at Wembley.

1983–84 FA Cup
Country England
 Wales
Defending championsManchester United
ChampionsEverton (4th title)
Runners-upWatford

First round proper

The first round matches were played over the weekend of 19–20 November 1983. Replays were played on 21–23 November, or 28 November.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Chester City 1–2 Chesterfield 19 November 1983
2 Darlington 5–0 Mossley 19 November 1983
3 Bournemouth 4–0 Walsall 19 November 1983
4 Barking 2–1 Farnborough Town 19 November 1983
5 Barnet 0–0 Bristol Rovers 19 November 1983
Replay Bristol Rovers 3–1 Barnet 22 November 1983
6 Burnley 2–0 Hyde United 19 November 1983
7 Poole Town 0–0 Newport County 20 November 1983
Replay Newport County 3–1 Poole Town 22 November 1983
8 Rochdale 1–0 Crewe Alexandra 19 November 1983
9 Yeovil Town 0–1 Harrow Borough 19 November 1983
10 Reading 2–0 Hereford United 19 November 1983
11 Northwich Victoria 1–1 Bangor City 19 November 1983
Replay Bangor City 1–0 Northwich Victoria 22 November 1983
12 Macclesfield Town 0–0 York City 19 November 1983
Replay York City 2–0 Macclesfield Town 22 November 1983
13 Gainsborough Trinity 0–2 Blackpool 19 November 1983
14 Wrexham 1–5 Sheffield United 19 November 1983
15 Tranmere Rovers 2–2 Bolton Wanderers 19 November 1983
Replay Bolton Wanderers 4–1 Tranmere Rovers 22 November 1983
16 Northampton Town 1–1 Waterlooville 19 November 1983
Replay Waterlooville 1–1 Northampton Town 23 November 1983
Replay Northampton Town 2–0 Waterlooville 28 November 1983
17 Bradford City 0–0 Wigan Athletic 19 November 1983
Replay Wigan Athletic 4–2 Bradford City 28 November 1983
18 Millwall 2–1 Dartford 19 November 1983
19 Wimbledon 2–1 Orient 19 November 1983
20 Penrith 0–2 Hull City 19 November 1983
21 Southend United 0–0 Plymouth Argyle 19 November 1983
Replay Plymouth Argyle 2–0 Southend United 22 November 1983
22 Exeter City 1–1 Maidstone United 19 November 1983
Replay Maidstone United 2–1 Exeter City 23 November 1983
23 Scunthorpe United 1–0 Preston North End 19 November 1983
24 Mansfield Town 3–0 Doncaster Rovers 19 November 1983
25 Port Vale 1–2 Lincoln City 19 November 1983
26 Halifax Town 2–3 Whitby Town 19 November 1983
27 Wealdstone 1–1 Enfield 19 November 1983
Replay Enfield 2–2 Wealdstone 22 November 1983
Replay Wealdstone 2–0 Enfield 28 November 1983
28 Torquay United 1–2 Colchester United 19 November 1983
29 Kettering Town 0–7 Swindon Town 19 November 1983
30 Rotherham United 0–0 Hartlepool United 19 November 1983
Replay Hartlepool United 0–1 Rotherham United 23 November 1983
31 Aldershot 1–1 Worcester City 19 November 1983
Replay Worcester City 2–1 Aldershot 21 November 1983
32 Boston United 0–3 Bury 19 November 1983
33 Chelmsford City 0–0 Wycombe Wanderers 19 November 1983
Replay Wycombe Wanderers 1–2 Chelmsford City 22 November 1983
34 Burton Albion 1–2 Windsor & Eton 19 November 1983
35 Dagenham 2–2 Brentford 19 November 1983
Replay Brentford 2–1 Dagenham 22 November 1983
36 Oxford United 2–0 Peterborough United 19 November 1983
37 Corinthian Casuals 0–0 Bristol City 19 November 1983
Replay Bristol City 4–0 Corinthian Casuals 23 November 1983
38 Telford United 3–0 Stockport County 19 November 1983
39 AP Leamington 0–1 Gillingham 19 November 1983
40 Frickley Athletic 0–1 Altrincham 19 November 1983

Second Round Proper

The second round matches were played mainly on 10 December 1983, with a couple of ties and replays being played on 13–14 December, or 19 December.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Chesterfield 2–2 Burnley 10 December 1983
Replay Burnley 3–2 Chesterfield 19 December 1983
2 Darlington 0–0 Altrincham 10 December 1983
Replay Altrincham 0–2 Darlington 14 December 1983
3 Reading 1–1 Oxford United 10 December 1983
Replay Oxford United 3–0 Reading 14 December 1983
4 Gillingham 6–1 Chelmsford City 10 December 1983
5 Bolton Wanderers 2–0 Mansfield Town 10 December 1983
6 Lincoln City 0–0 Sheffield United 10 December 1983
Replay Sheffield United 1–0 Lincoln City 19 December 1983
7 Windsor & Eton 0–0 Bournemouth 13 December 1983
Replay Bournemouth 2–0 Windsor & Eton 19 December 1983
8 Bangor City 1–1 Blackpool 10 December 1983
Replay Blackpool 2–1 Bangor City 13 December 1983
9 Brentford 3–2 Wimbledon 10 December 1983
10 Bristol Rovers 1–2 Bristol City 10 December 1983
11 Maidstone United 3–2 Worcester City 10 December 1983
12 Northampton Town 1–1 Telford United 10 December 1983
Replay Telford United 3–2 Northampton Town 14 December 1983
13 Plymouth Argyle 2–1 Barking 10 December 1983
14 Millwall 2–3 Swindon Town 10 December 1983
15 Scunthorpe United 2–0 Bury 10 December 1983
16 York City 0–2 Rochdale 13 December 1983
17 Rotherham United 2–1 Hull City 10 December 1983
18 Wigan Athletic 1–0 Whitby Town 10 December 1983
19 Colchester United 4–0 Wealdstone 10 December 1983
20 Harrow Borough 1–3 Newport County 10 December 1983

Third round proper

The third round matches were played over the weekend 6–8 January 1984. Replays took place on 10–11 January, with second replays on 16 January.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Blackpool 2–1 Manchester City 7 January 1984
2 Darlington 4–1 Maidstone United 7 January 1984
3 Bournemouth 2–0 Manchester United 7 January 1984
4 Burnley 0–0 Oxford United 7 January 1984
Replay Oxford United 2–1 Burnley 11 January 1984
5 Liverpool 4–0 Newcastle United 6 January 1984
6 Rochdale 1–4 Telford United 7 January 1984
7 Gillingham 5–3 Brentford 7 January 1984
8 Notts County 2–2 Bristol City 8 January 1984
Replay Bristol City 0–2 Notts County 10 January 1984
9 Nottingham Forest 1–2 Southampton 7 January 1984
10 Blackburn Rovers 1–0 Chelsea 7 January 1984
11 Aston Villa 1–1 Norwich City 7 January 1984
Replay Norwich City 3–0 Aston Villa 11 January 1984
12 Sheffield Wednesday 1–0 Barnsley 7 January 1984
13 Bolton Wanderers 0–3 Sunderland 7 January 1984
14 Middlesbrough 3–2 Arsenal 7 January 1984
15 Luton Town 2–2 Watford 7 January 1984
Replay Watford 4–3 Luton Town 10 January 1984
16 Shrewsbury Town 3–0 Oldham Athletic 7 January 1984
17 Sheffield United 1–1 Birmingham City 7 January 1984
Replay Birmingham City 2–0 Sheffield United 10 January 1984
18 Fulham 0–0 Tottenham Hotspur 7 January 1984
Replay Tottenham Hotspur 2–0 Fulham 11 January 1984
19 Coventry City 1–1 Wolverhampton Wanderers 7 January 1984
Replay Wolverhampton Wanderers 1–1 Coventry City 10 January 1984
Replay Coventry City 3–0 Wolverhampton Wanderers 16 January 1984
20 Portsmouth 2–1 Grimsby Town 7 January 1984
21 West Ham United 1–0 Wigan Athletic 7 January 1984
22 Brighton & Hove Albion 2–0 Swansea City 7 January 1984
23 Plymouth Argyle 2–2 Newport County 7 January 1984
Replay Newport County 0–1 Plymouth Argyle 10 January 1984
24 Carlisle United 1–1 Swindon Town 7 January 1984
Replay Swindon Town 3–1 Carlisle United 10 January 1984
25 Crystal Palace 1–0 Leicester City 7 January 1984
26 Huddersfield Town 2–1 Queens Park Rangers 7 January 1984
27 Cardiff City 0–3 Ipswich Town 7 January 1984
28 Leeds United 1–1 Scunthorpe United 7 January 1984
Replay Scunthorpe United 1–1 Leeds United 10 January 1984
Replay Scunthorpe United 4–2 Leeds United 16 January 1984
29 Stoke City 0–2 Everton 7 January 1984
30 Rotherham United 0–0 West Bromwich Albion 7 January 1984
Replay West Bromwich Albion 3–0 Rotherham United 11 January 1984
31 Colchester United 0–1 Charlton Athletic 7 January 1984
32 Cambridge United 0–3 Derby County 7 January 1984

Fourth round proper

The fourth round matches were mainly played over the weekend of 28–29 January 1984. Some games were instead played or replayed on 30 January–1 February.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Sheffield Wednesday 3–2 Coventry City 30 January 1984
2 Middlesbrough 2–0 Bournemouth 31 January 1984
3 West Bromwich Albion 1–0 Scunthorpe United 1 February 1984
4 Sunderland 1–2 Birmingham City 28 January 1984
5 Derby County 3–2 Telford United 1 February 1984
6 Everton 0–0 Gillingham 28 January 1984
Replay Gillingham 0–0 Everton 31 January 1984
Replay Gillingham 0–3 Everton 6 February 1984
7 Swindon Town 1–2 Blackburn Rovers 28 January 1984
8 Shrewsbury Town 2–0 Ipswich Town 28 January 1984
9 Tottenham Hotspur 0–0 Norwich City 28 January 1984
Replay Norwich City 2–1 Tottenham Hotspur 1 February 1984
10 Portsmouth 0–1 Southampton 28 January 1984
11 Brighton & Hove Albion 2–0 Liverpool 29 January 1984
12 Plymouth Argyle 2–1 Darlington 28 January 1984
13 Crystal Palace 1–1 West Ham United 28 January 1984
Replay West Ham United 2–0 Crystal Palace 31 January 1984
14 Huddersfield Town 1–2 Notts County 1 February 1984
15 Charlton Athletic 0–2 Watford 28 January 1984
16 Oxford United 2–1 Blackpool 28 January 1984

Fifth round proper

The fifth round matches were all played on 17–18 February 1984, with no replays required.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Watford 3–1 Brighton & Hove Albion 18 February 1984
2 Notts County 1–0 Middlesbrough 18 February 1984
3 Blackburn Rovers 0–1 Southampton 17 February 1984
4 West Bromwich Albion 0–1 Plymouth Argyle 18 February 1984
5 Derby County 2–1 Norwich City 18 February 1984
6 Everton 3–0 Shrewsbury Town 18 February 1984
7 Birmingham City 3–0 West Ham United 18 February 1984
8 Oxford United 0–3 Sheffield Wednesday 18 February 1984

Sixth round proper

The sixth round matches were played on the weekend of 10–11 March 1984 with replays on 14 and 20 March.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Notts County 1–2 Everton 10 March 1984
2 Sheffield Wednesday 0–0 Southampton 11 March 1984
Replay Southampton 5–1 Sheffield Wednesday 20 March 1984
3 Plymouth Argyle 0–0 Derby County 10 March 1984
Replay Derby County 0–1 Plymouth Argyle 14 March 1984
4 Birmingham City 1–3 Watford 10 March 1984

Semi-Finals

Everton1–0
(a.e.t)
Southampton
Heath Goal 117'
Watford1–0Plymouth Argyle
Reilly Goal

Final

Everton2 – 0Watford
Sharp Goal 38'
Gray Goal 51'
(Report)
Everton
Watford

TV Coverage

The right to show FA Cup games were, as with Football League matches, shared between the BBC and ITV network. For the first time, four games were allowed to be screened Live from the Third round to the sixth and shared between the two companies, as well as the Final. An attempt by the broadcasters to show the Semi-Finals live on consecutive Sunday afternoons was rejected by the FA in November 1983. Other games were shown in a highlights format. ITV coverage was now nationalized for the first time, although a strike prevented ITV coverage of the Third round. No highlights or live games were screened from Rounds One and Two. Third Round BBC Liverpool v Newcastle United (LIVE-Friday Evening), Fulham v Tottenham Hotspur, Norwich City v Aston Villa (Midweek replay) ITV No games broadcast due to strike. Fourth Round BBC Shrewsbury Town v Ipswich Town, Tottenham Hotspur v Norwich City, Portsmouth v Southampton ITV Brighton & Hove Albion v Liverpool (LIVE-Sunday Afternoon), Norwich City v Tottenham Hotspur (Midweek replay) Fifth Round BBC Blackburn Rovers v Southampton (LIVE-Friday Evening) ITV Watford v Brighton & Hove Albion, Derby County v Norwich City, Oxford United v Sheffield Wednesday Sixth RoundBBC Birmingham City v Watford, Plymouth Argyle v Derby County, Notts County v Everton, Derby County v Plymouth Argyle (Midweek replay) ITV Sheffield Wednesday v Southampton (LIVE-Sunday Afternoon) Semi-Finals BBC Plymouth Argyle v Watford ITV Everton v Southampton Final Everton v Watford, shown Live by both the BBC & ITV.

References

1983–84 Birmingham City F.C. season

The 1983–84 Football League season was Birmingham City Football Club's 81st in the Football League and their 49th in the First Division. They finished in 20th position in the 22-team division, so were relegated to the Second Division for 1984–85. They entered the 1983–84 FA Cup in the third round proper and lost to Watford in the quarter-final. In the League Cup, after defeating Notts County in the third round only after three replays, they lost to Liverpool in the fourth round after a replay.

Mick Harford was the club's top scorer with 15 goals in all competitions; if only league games are counted, Harford and Howard Gayle were joint leaders with 8. The highest attendance, of 40,220 against Watford in the FA Cup sixth round, was the last 40,000 crowd seen at St Andrew's, as of 2012; the ground capacity was reduced to around 30,000 when the stadium was converted to all-seater in the 1990s.

1983–84 FA Cup qualifying rounds

The FA Cup 1983–84 is the 103rd season of the world's oldest football knockout competition; The Football Association Challenge Cup, or FA Cup for short. The large number of clubs entering the tournament from lower down the English football league system meant that the competition started with a number of preliminary and qualifying rounds. The 28 victorious teams from the Fourth Round Qualifying progressed to the First Round Proper.

1983–84 York City F.C. season

The 1983–84 season was the 62nd season of competitive association football and 55th season in the Football League played by York City Football Club, a professional football club based in York, North Yorkshire, England. They finished in first position in the 24-team 1983–84 Football League Fourth Division, in doing so becoming the first Football League club to reach and surpass a hundred points in a season. By winning the Fourth Division championship, York earned the first major honour in the club's history.

They entered the 1983–84 FA Cup in the first round, beating Macclesfield Town in a replay before losing at home to Rochdale in the second round. They were knocked in the first round of both the 1983–84 Football League Cup and 1983–84 Associate Members' Cup, being beaten by Grimsby Town and Hull City respectively.

18 players made at least one appearance in nationally organised first-team competition, and there were 11 different goalscorers. Defender John MacPhail, midfielder Gary Ford and striker John Byrne played in all 52 first-team matches over the season. Byrne finished as leading goalscorer with 28 goals, of which 27 came in league competition and one came in the FA Cup. The winner of the Clubman of the Year award was MacPhail.

1984 FA Charity Shield

The 1984 FA Charity Shield (also known as the FA Charity Shield sponsored by General Motors for sponsorship reasons) was the 62nd Charity Shield, a football match contested by the holders of the Football League First Division and FA Cup. This edition featured a Merseyside derby between Liverpool and Everton at Wembley Stadium. Liverpool won the League and Everton won the FA Cup. The match was held on 18 August 1984 and was won 1–0 by Everton after an own goal from Bruce Grobbelaar. Graeme Sharp was straight in on goal and tried to round Grobbelaar, but the ball was blocked on the line by Alan Hansen and ricocheted straight at the shins of Grobbelaar and back into the net.

1984 FA Cup Final

The 1984 FA Cup Final was contested by Everton and Watford at Wembley. Everton won 2–0, with one goal by Graeme Sharp and a controversial goal from Andy Gray. He was adjudged by many to have fouled the Watford goalkeeper Steve Sherwood by heading the ball from Sherwood's hands. Everton had reached the final seven times previously, winning in 1906, 1933 and 1966. This was Watford's first FA Cup Final appearance.

With the exception of Andy Gray (who had been a Football League Cup winner earlier in his career with Aston Villa and then Wolverhampton Wanderers), this was the first major honour that any of the Everton players in this match had collected. It also ended Everton's 14-year wait for a trophy and was the first of eight honours they would win over the next four seasons. The period would prove to be the most successful spell in the club's history.

The closest Watford came to scoring was inside the first three minutes when John Barnes miscued a shot on the Everton goal, while Les Taylor's 25-yard shot went wide and Mo Johnston had a narrow miss with a header.

1985–86 FA Cup qualifying rounds

The FA Cup 1985–86 is the 105th season of the world's oldest football knockout competition; The Football Association Challenge Cup, or FA Cup for short. The large number of clubs entering the tournament from lower down the English football league system meant that the competition started with a number of preliminary and qualifying rounds. The 28 victorious teams from the Fourth Round Qualifying progressed to the First Round Proper.

Alan Irvine (footballer, born 1958)

James Alan Irvine (born 12 July 1958) is a Scottish former professional footballer and coach.

Irvine played as a Winger for Queen's Park, Everton, Crystal Palace, Dundee United and Blackburn Rovers.

As a coach, Irvine worked in various roles at Blackburn Rovers, Preston North End, Newcastle United and Everton before becoming a manager, firstly with Preston and then Sheffield Wednesday. After three years in charge of the Everton Academy, he became head coach of West Bromwich Albion. He rejoined Blackburn as assistant manager in November 2015. In March 2017, he became caretaker manager of Norwich City before leaving in November 2017 to join West Ham United under new manager, David Moyes. He left the east London club at the end of the 2017–18 season, after Moyes' contract was not renewed.

Andy Rogers (footballer)

Andrew Rogers (born 1 December 1956 in Chatteris, England) is a former professional footballer. Rogers, a Midfielder, is most noted for playing for Plymouth Argyle in the 1980s. He also played for Southampton and Reading.

Gary Mabbutt

Gary Vincent Mabbutt (born 23 August 1961) is an English former professional footballer who made more than 750 appearances playing for Bristol Rovers and Tottenham Hotspur, and won 16 caps for the England national team. He mostly played in central defence but was a versatile player who excelled also in midfield.

Liverpool F.C.

Liverpool Football Club is a professional football club in Liverpool, England, that competes in the Premier League, the top tier of English football. The club has won 6 European Cups, more than any other English club, 3 UEFA Cups, 3 UEFA Super Cups, 18 League titles, 7 FA Cups, a record 8 League Cups, 15 FA Community Shields and 1 Football League Super Cup.

Founded in 1892, the club joined the Football League the following year and has played at Anfield since its formation. Liverpool established itself as a major force in English and European football in the 1970s and 1980s when Bill Shankly, Bob Paisley, Joe Fagan and Kenny Dalglish led the club to a combined eleven League titles, four European Cups, two UEFA Cups, seven domestic cups and several super cups within a span of eighteen seasons. Under the management of Rafael Benítez and captained by homegrown star Steven Gerrard, Liverpool became European champions for the fifth time in 2005 before adding a sixth crown under Jürgen Klopp in 2019.

Liverpool was the ninth highest-earning football club in the world in 2016–17, with an annual revenue of €424.2 million, and the world's eighth most valuable football club in 2018, valued at $1.944 billion. The club is one of the most widely supported teams in the world. Liverpool has long-standing rivalries with Manchester United and Everton.

The club's supporters have been involved in two major tragedies: the Heysel Stadium disaster, where escaping fans were pressed against a collapsing wall at the 1985 European Cup Final in Brussels, with 39 people – mostly Italians and Juventus fans – dying, after which English clubs were given a five-year ban from European competition, and the Hillsborough disaster in 1989, where 96 Liverpool supporters died in a crush against perimeter fencing.

The team changed from red shirts and white shorts to an all-red home strip in 1964 which has been used ever since. Red has been the main shirt colour ever since 1896. The club's anthem is "You'll Never Walk Alone".

Mark Lawrenson

Mark Thomas Lawrenson (born 2 June 1957) is a former Republic of Ireland international footballer who played as a defender for Liverpool, among others, during the 1970s and 1980s. After a short career as a manager, he has since been a radio, television and internet pundit for the BBC, TV3 and Today FM. Born and raised in England, Lawrenson qualified to play for the Republic of Ireland through his grandfather, Thomas Crotty, who was born in Waterford.

Redhill F.C.

Redhill F.C. is an English football club based in Redhill, Surrey. The club are currently members of the Combined Counties League Premier Division and play at Kiln Brow. The club is affiliated to the Surrey County Football Association

Robbie Savage (footballer, born 1960)

Robert James Savage (born 8 January 1960) is an English footballer who played as a midfielder in the Football League for Wrexham, Stoke City, Bournemouth, Bradford City and Bolton Wanderers.

Terry Connor

Terence Fitzroy Connor (born 9 November 1962) is an English former football player turned football coach, who was assistant manager of Championship club Ipswich Town. He was born in Leeds and was a pupil at Foxwood School, Seacroft, Leeds.As a player, Connor scored 91 goals from 358 games in the Football League as a striker playing for Leeds United, Brighton & Hove Albion, Portsmouth, Swansea City and Bristol City. He was capped once for the England under-21 team.

He moved into coaching following his playing retirement, briefly working as a coach at both Bristol Rovers and Bristol City before joining Wolves in 1999. After holding a variety of positions he served as Wolves' manager for thirteen games during their Premier League relegation in 2012.

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