1981 Pro Bowl

The 1981 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 31st annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1980 season. The game was played on Sunday, February 1, 1981, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final score was NFC 21, AFC 7.[1]

Sam Rutigliano of the Cleveland Browns led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Atlanta Falcons head coach Leeman Bennett.[1] The referee was Gordon McCarter.[1]

1981 NFL Pro Bowl
1981 Pro Bowl logo
AFC NFC
7 21
Head coach:
Sam Rutigliano
(Cleveland Browns)
Head coach:
Leeman Bennett
(Atlanta Falcons)
1234 Total
AFC 0700 7
NFC 36012 21
DateFebruary 1, 1981
StadiumAloha Stadium, Honolulu, Hawaii
MVPEddie Murray (Detroit Lions)
RefereeGordon McCarter
Attendance50,360
TV in the United States
NetworkABC
AnnouncersFrank Gifford, Howard Cosell, Fran Tarkenton & Lynn Swann

NFL Rosters[2]

NFC

Offense

LT - Pat Donovan LT - Mike Kenn LG - Kent Hill LG - Herbert Scott C - Rich Saul C - Jeff Van Note RG - Dennis Harrah RT - Dan Dierdorf QB - Steve Bartkowski QB - Ron Jaworski RB - Ottis Anderson RB - Billy Sims RB - Walter Payton FB - William Andrews TE - Jimmie Giles TE - Junior Miller WR - Alfred Jenkins WR - Pat Tilley WR - Harold Carmichael WR - Ahmad Rashād WR - James Lofton

Defense

LCB Pat Thomas LCB Lemar Parrish FS - Nolan Cromwell LLB - Matt Blair LOLB - Dave Lewis LOLB - Brad Van Pelt MLB - Jack Reynolds MLB - Bob Breunig SS - Gary Fencik RCB - Joe Lavender RCB - Rod Perry LDE Dan Hampton NT - Charlie Johnson LDT Larry Brooks RDT Randy White RDE - Al Baker RDE - Lee Roy Selmon

Special Team

K - Eddie Murray P - Dave Jennings KR/PR - Mike Nelms

AFC

Offense

LT - Art Shell LT - Doug Dieken LG - Doug Wilkerson LG - John Hannah C - Tom DeLeone C - Mike Webster RG - Joe DeLamilleure RT - Marvin Powell QB - Dan Fouts QB - Brian Sipe RB - Kenny King RB - Earl Campbell FB - Mike Pruitt FB - Franco Harris TE - Dave Casper TE - Kellen Winslow WR - Jerry Butler WR - Charlie Joiner WR - Stanley Morgan WR - John Jefferson

Defense

LCB -Lester Hayes FS - Tim Fox FS - Gary Barbaro LLB - Jack Ham LLB - Matt Blair LILB - Steve Nelson LOLB - Ted Hendricks MLB - Jack Lambert ROLB - Robert Brazille SS - Donnie Shell RCB - Greg Stemrick RCB - Mike Haynes LDE - Art Still NT - Charlie Johnson LDT - Louie Kelcher RDT - Gary Johnson RDE - Julius Adams RDE - Fred Dean

Special Team

K - John Smith P - Ray Guy PR/RB - Joe Cribbs PR/WR - J.T. Smith

Rookie placekicker Eddie Murray of the Detroit Lions was named the game's Most Valuable Player.[3]

Players on the winning NFC team received $5,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $2,500.[4] The game was the first in NFL history played in February.

References

  1. ^ a b c "1981 Pro Bowl game book" (PDF). NFL Game Statistics & Information. National Football League. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 30, 2012. Retrieved January 30, 2012.
  2. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/years/1980/probowl.htm
  3. ^ "NFC Clobbers AFC in Pro Bowl". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. AP. February 2, 1981. p. 20. Retrieved January 16, 2012.
  4. ^ "NFL Pro Bowl history". CBSSports.com. Archived from the original on January 16, 2012. Retrieved January 16, 2012.

External links

1978 Pittsburgh Steelers season

The 1978 Pittsburgh Steelers season was the franchise's 46th season in the National Football League (NFL). The season concluded with the team winning Super Bowl XIII to become the first franchise in the NFL to win three Super Bowl titles. The championship run was led by quarterback Terry Bradshaw and the team's vaunted Steel Curtain defense. This team is regarded as one of the greatest defensive teams of all time and one of the greatest teams in NFL history. Bradshaw put together the best year of his career to that point, becoming only the second Steeler to win the NFL MVP award. Ten Steelers players were named to the Pro Bowl team, and four were judged as first-team All-Pros by the AP. Head coach Chuck Noll returned for his tenth season—moving him ahead of Walt Kiesling as the longest tenured head coach in the team's history to that point.The Steelers entered the season as defending champions of the AFC Central Division, coming off a 9–5 record in 1977. Despite winning their division, the previous season was a difficult one for the team (both on and off the field) which culminated in a division round playoff loss to the Denver Broncos on Christmas Eve.

The team began the 1978 season with seven straight victories, before losing to the Houston Oilers in prime time on Monday Night Football. They finished the season with a league-best 14–2 record, including a 5-game winning streak to close the season. This record assured them they would play at home throughout the 1978 playoffs. It was also the best record compiled in the team's history (since surpassed only by a 15–1 mark in 2004).The 1978 Steelers team was rated the thirty-fifth best team in the history of the NFL (to September 2015) by FiveThirtyEight, a polling aggregation and statistical service. The rating is based upon FiveThirtyEight's proprietary Elo rating system algorithm. Only two Steelers teams were rated higher: the 1975 team at twelfth and the 2005 team one slot ahead of the 1978 team at thirty-fourth.

1982 Pro Bowl

The 1982 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 32nd annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1981 season. The game was played on Sunday, January 31, 1982, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii in front of a crowd of 49,521. The final score was AFC 16, NFC 13.Don Shula of the Miami Dolphins led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Tampa Bay Buccaneers head coach John McKay. The referee was Red Cashion.The NFC gained a 13-13 tie with 2:43 to go when Tony Dorsett ran four yards for a touchdown. In the drive to the game-winning field goal, Dan Fouts completed 3 passes, including a 23-yarder to Kellen Winslow that put the ball on the NFC's 5-yard line to set up a 23-yard game winning field goal by Nick Lowery to earn AFC a victory.

Kellen Winslow of the San Diego Chargers and Lee Roy Selmon of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers were named the game's Most Valuable Players. The referee was Red Cashion.Players on the winning AFC team received $5,000 apiece while the NFC participants each took home $2,500. The total number of tickets sold for the game was 50,402 which set a new ticket sales record for Aloha Stadium.

Brian Sipe

Brian Winfield Sipe (born August 8, 1949) is a former professional American football quarterback who played for the Cleveland Browns of the National Football League (NFL) from 1974 to 1983. He then played in the United States Football League for two seasons.

Although mostly sidelined for the first several years of his NFL career, Sipe was eventually recognized as one of the better quarterbacks in Browns history, winning the league's MVP Award in 1980. He was a college football star under head coach Don Coryell at San Diego State University, where he studied architecture and became the team's quarterbacks coach in 2009, remaining in that role for five years, through 2014. He also competed in the 1961 Little League World Series for El Cajon, California, and prepped at Grossmont High School.

Jerry Smith (American football coach)

Jerome Anthony Smith (September 9, 1930 – August 6, 2011) was an American football player and coach. Jerry was born in Dayton, Ohio and attended Chaminade High School, graduating in 1948. At Chaminade he played tight end and later in 1982 was elected to the school's Athletic Hall of Fame.After Smith's college football career, which he spent at Wisconsin, the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League (NFL) selected Smith in the 1952 NFL Draft. He played at left guard for the team in 1952 and 1953. In 1956, he split time between the 49ers and Green Bay Packers. Smith played in 29 games during his NFL career.Beginning in 1960, he joined the Boston Patriots as a coach of the team's defensive linemen and linebackers. Two years later, he took a similar role with the Buffalo Bills; in his six years as a Bills coach, the team won two American Football League championships. In 1968, the Cleveland Browns hired Smith as an assistant personnel director. From 1969 to 1970, Smith coached in the New Orleans Saints organization. The following year, he became the Denver Broncos' offensive line coach. On November 17, 1971, Broncos head coach Lou Saban, who had also been Smith's boss in Boston and Buffalo, resigned and Smith was named his replacement for the season's last five games. The Broncos posted a 2–3 record under Smith. Following the 1971 season, he became the Houston Oilers' defensive line coach for 1972; after one season, he returned to the Browns and served multiple roles. He coached the San Diego Chargers' defensive line from 1977 through 1983. He received credit for developing the front four of Fred Dean, Leroy Jones, Louie Kelcher, and Gary "Big Hands" Johnson. Known as the Bruise Brothers, the group helped the Chargers lead the NFL in 1980 with 60 sacks. Dean, Kelcher, and Johnson all started in the 1981 Pro Bowl.

Joe Delaney

Joe Alton Delaney (; October 30, 1958 – June 29, 1983) was an American football running back who played two seasons in the National Football League (NFL). In his two seasons with the Kansas City Chiefs, Delaney set four franchise records that would stand for more than twenty years.

He was a two-time All-American athlete for the Northwestern State Demons football team, as well as a track and field star. Delaney played two seasons with the Chiefs and was chosen as the AFC Rookie of the Year in 1981 by United Press International.Delaney died on June 29, 1983 while attempting to rescue three children from drowning in a pond in Monroe in northeastern Louisiana. He was posthumously awarded the Presidential Citizen's Medal from U.S. President Ronald W. Reagan. While not officially retired, his jersey number while playing for the Chiefs, No. 37, has not been worn since his death.

List of New England Patriots players

This is a list of New England Patriots/Boston Patriots players who appeared on the active roster during the regular season. The history of New England Patriots began in 1960, with the formation of the American Football League. Then known as the Boston Patriots, the team's first draft pick was Ron Burton. They have had five members inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. 22 players are members of the New England Patriots Hall of Fame, and seven of those have had their numbers retired.

Rafael Septién

José Rafael Septién Michel (born December 12, 1953) is a former Mexican-American placekicker in the National Football League for the Los Angeles Rams and Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

Scituate, Massachusetts

Scituate ( (listen)) is a seacoast town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, United States, on the South Shore, midway between Boston and Plymouth. The population was 18,133 at the 2010 census.For geographic and demographic information on the village of North Scituate, which is a part of Scituate, please see the article North Scituate, Massachusetts.

Steve Watson (wide receiver)

Steve Ross Watson (born May 28, 1957) is a former American football wide receiver and current wide receivers coach.

After high school at St. Mark's High School in Wilmington, Delaware, Watson attended Temple University and entered the National Football League (NFL) as an undrafted free agent in 1979.

Watson played his entire nine year NFL career in Denver, appearing in 125 games. After recording only six receptions in each of his first two seasons, in 1981 Watson had 60 receptions for a career-best 1,244 yards and league-leading 13 TDs (including a 95-yard reception in game 6, the longest in the NFL that season and 3rd longest in franchise history). His 20.73 yards per catch remains a Broncos franchise record, and earned him a spot in the 1981 Pro Bowl. Watson had 555 receiving yards the 9 game strike shortened season in 1982, hauled in 59 receptions for 1,133 yards in 1983 and a career-best 69 receptions for 1,170 in 1984. The 13-3 Broncos lost to Pittsburgh in the first round of the playoffs, but Watson had 11 receptions for a franchise record 177 yards. Watson started 31 of 32 games over the next two years, but saw his production fall to 915 yards, then 699. After starting just one game in the 1987 season, Watson retired with career totals of 353 receptions for 6,112 yards and 36 touchdowns.

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