1981 FA Cup Final

The 1981 FA Cup Final was the 100th final of the FA Cup, and was contested by Tottenham Hotspur and Manchester City.

The original match took place on Saturday 9 May 1981 at Wembley, and finished 1–1 after extra-time. Tommy Hutchison opened the scoring for City in the 30th minute, but scored an own-goal in the 79th minute to bring Spurs level.

The replay took place five days later on Thursday 14 May 1981, and was the first replay since 1970 and the first to be staged at Wembley. Ricky Villa opened the scoring for Spurs in the eighth minute, before Steve MacKenzie equalised for City three minutes later. A Kevin Reeves penalty five minutes into the second half put the Manchester side ahead, before Garth Crooks brought Spurs level again in the 70th minute. Then, in the 76th minute, Tony Galvin passed to Villa 30 yards from City's goal, and the Argentinian proceeded to skip past four defenders before slotting the ball past City goalkeeper Joe Corrigan. This goal was voted Wembley Goal of the Century in 2001, and it won Tottenham the match, 3–2, and the FA Cup for the sixth time.

1981 FA Cup Final
Old Wembley Stadium (external view)
Event1980–81 FA Cup
Tottenham Hotspur Manchester City
Final
Tottenham Hotspur Manchester City
1 1
Date9 May 1981
VenueWembley Stadium, London
RefereeKeith Hackett (South Yorkshire)
Attendance100,000
Replay
Tottenham Hotspur Manchester City
3 2
Date14 May 1981
VenueWembley Stadium, London
RefereeKeith Hackett (South Yorkshire)
Attendance92,000

Match details

Tottenham Hotspur1–1
(a.e.t)
Manchester City
Hutchison Goal 79' (o.g.) (Report) Hutchison Goal 30'
Tottenham Hotspur
Manchester City
GK 1 England Milija Aleksic
LB 2 Republic of Ireland Chris Hughton
CB 3 England Paul Miller
CB 4 England Graham Roberts
RB 5 England Steve Perryman (c)
RM 6 Argentina Ricardo Villa Substituted off 68'
CM 7 Argentina Osvaldo Ardiles
CF 8 Scotland Steve Archibald
LM 9 Republic of Ireland Tony Galvin
CM 10 England Glenn Hoddle
CF 11 England Garth Crooks
Substitute:
MF 12 England Garry Brooke Substituted in 68'
Manager:
England Keith Burkinshaw
GK 1 England Joe Corrigan
RB 2 England Ray Ranson
LB 3 Scotland Bobby McDonald
CB 4 England Nicky Reid
LM 5 England Paul Power (c)
CB 6 England Tommy Caton
CF 7 England Dave Bennett
CM 8 Scotland Gerry Gow
CM 9 England Steve MacKenzie
RM 10 Scotland Tommy Hutchison Substituted off 105'
CF 11 England Kevin Reeves
Substitute:
MF 12 England Tony Henry Substituted in 105'
Manager:
England John Bond

Match rules

  • 90 minutes.
  • 30 minutes of extra-time if necessary.
  • Replay if scores still level.
  • One substitute.

Replay

Tottenham Hotspur3–2Manchester City
Villa Goal 8'76'
Crooks Goal 70'
(Report) MacKenzie Goal 11'
Reeves Goal 50' (pen.)
Tottenham Hotspur
Manchester City
GK 1 England Milija Aleksic
LB 2 Republic of Ireland Chris Hughton
CB 3 England Paul Miller
CB 4 England Graham Roberts
RM 5 Argentina Ricardo Villa
RB 6 England Steve Perryman (c)
CM 7 Argentina Osvaldo Ardiles
CF 8 Scotland Steve Archibald
LM 9 Republic of Ireland Tony Galvin
CM 10 England Glenn Hoddle
CF 11 England Garth Crooks
Substitute:
MF 12 England Garry Brooke
Manager:
England Keith Burkinshaw
GK 1 England Joe Corrigan
RB 2 England Ray Ranson
LB 3 Scotland Bobby McDonald Substituted off 79'
CB 4 England Nicky Reid
LM 5 England Paul Power (c)
CB 6 England Tommy Caton
CF 7 England Dave Bennett
CM 8 Scotland Gerry Gow
CM 9 England Steve MacKenzie
RM 10 Scotland Tommy Hutchison
CF 11 England Kevin Reeves
Substitute:
MF 12 England Dennis Tueart Substituted in 79'
Manager:
England John Bond

Match rules

  • 90 minutes.
  • 30 minutes of extra-time if necessary.
  • Replay if scores still level.
  • One substitute.

Cup final song

Tottenham's cup final song was "Ossie's dream", recorded by the musical duo Chas and Dave with the Tottenham squad. Argentine player Ossie Ardiles famously sang the line "In the cup for Tottingham". [1]

External links

1980–81 in English football

The 1980–81 season was the 101st season of competitive football in England.

1981 in the United Kingdom

Events from the year 1981 in the United Kingdom.

Dave Bennett (footballer, born 1959)

David Anthony Bennett (born 11 July 1959) is an English former professional footballer. He made over 200 appearances in the Football League during his career, including playing in two FA Cup Finals; 1981 for Manchester City, when he finished on the losing side, and 1987, when he produced a Man of the Match performance as Coventry City beat Tottenham Hotspur 3–2.

Garry Brooke

Garry James Brooke (born 24 November 1960) is a former professional footballer who played for Tottenham Hotspur, Norwich City, FC Groningen, Wimbledon, Stoke City and Brentford before moving into non-league football.

Gerry Gow

Gerry Gow (29 May 1952 – 10 October 2016) was a footballer who played for Bristol City in the 1970s, making 375 appearances for them in The Football League. Gow made his debut for Bristol City in 1970 at the age of 17. He was a member of the side which achieved promotion in 1976 to the First Division. He left Bristol City aged 28 following the team's relegation to the Second Division in 1980.After his time at Bristol City he played for Manchester City, appearing in the 1981 FA Cup Final, and Rotherham United, before transferring to Burnley in August 1983. He then moved to Yeovil Town where he was player manager for a time.Bristol City granted Gow a retrospective testimonial in 2012, when a Legends team played against a Manchester City Legends side.Gerry Gow is mentioned in the song 'This One's for Now' by the band Half Man Half Biscuit on their album Urge For Offal.

He died of cancer on 10 October 2016 at the age of 64.

Glory Glory (football chant)

"Glory Glory" is a terrace chant sung in association football in the United Kingdom and in other sport. It uses the tune of the American Civil War song "The Battle Hymn of the Republic", with the chorus "Glory, Glory, Hallelujah" – the chant replaces "Hallelujah" with the name of the favoured team. The chant's popularity has caused several clubs to release their version as an official team song.

Joe Corrigan

Joseph Thomas Corrigan (born 18 November 1948), is a former football goalkeeper who played in the Football League for Manchester City, Brighton & Hove Albion, Norwich City and Stoke City as well as the England national team.

Corrigan began his career at Manchester City making his professional debut in 1967. In the 1969–70 season, he established himself as the first choice 'keeper at Maine Road, taking over from the ageing Harry Dowd. He spent 16 seasons at Manchester City, winning the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup and League Cup twice, while also earning nine England caps. He left in 1983 to play for the North American Soccer League's Seattle Sounders, then returned to England for spells with Brighton & Hove Albion, Norwich City and Stoke City. A neck injury forced him to retire in 1985.

John Bond (footballer)

John Frederick Bond (17 December 1932 – 25 September 2012) was an English professional football player and manager. He played from 1950 until 1966 for West Ham United, making 444 appearances in all competitions and scoring 37 goals. He was a member of the West Ham side which won the 1957–58 Second Division and the 1964 FA Cup. He also played for Torquay United until 1969. He managed seven different Football League clubs, and was the manager of the Norwich City side which made the 1975 Football League Cup Final and the Manchester City side which made the 1981 FA Cup Final. He is the father of Kevin Bond, a former footballer and coach.

Keith Burkinshaw

Harry Keith Burkinshaw (born 23 June 1935) is an English former professional footballer and football manager. He is one of the most successful managers of Tottenham Hotspur, winning 3 major trophies for the club as manager there.

Keith Hackett

Keith Stuart Hackett (born 22 June 1944) is an English former football referee, who began refereeing in local leagues in the Sheffield, West Riding of Yorkshire area in 1960. He is counted amongst the top 100 referees of all time in a list maintained by the International Federation of Football History and Statistics (IFFHS).

Kevin Reeves

Kevin Philip Reeves (born 20 October 1957) is the Chief Scout at Everton football club. He is an English retired football forward, born in Burley, Hampshire, who scored 103 goals from 333 appearances in the Football League playing for Bournemouth, Norwich City, Manchester City and Burnley, and was capped twice by England at full international level. As of 4 July 2013, he is Everton F.C.'s head scout.

Linvoy Primus

Linvoy Stephen Primus MBE (born 14 September 1973) is an English former footballer.

Born in Forest Gate, England, to Caribbean-born parents, Primus began his professional career at Charlton Athletic, where he made four league appearances. Primus moved on a free transfer to Barnet and established himself as a first team regular in the lower divisions of English football before earning a £250,000 transfer to Reading.

A Bosman transfer to Portsmouth followed after three successful seasons at the Berkshire-based club. Initially, Primus struggled to break into the team and had his progress hindered by injuries. But the 2002–03 season signaled a change in direction as Primus broke into the first team and won Portsmouth fan's player of the season as well as the PFA Fans' Player of the Year for his division. For the next three seasons Primus was in and out of the first team and worked under three managers: Harry Redknapp, Velimir Zajec and Alain Perrin. The 2006–07 season was the last injury-free season for Primus as a career-threatening knee injury meant he would not make an appearance the following season. Primus went out on loan to former club Charlton and made 10 appearances and one further appearance for Portsmouth before retiring through injury in December 2009. The Milton End stand at Fratton Park was renamed the 'Linvoy Primus Community Stand' because of his outstanding services to the club.

Primus, who is married and has three children, is known for his Christian charity work. He is involved in the Christian charity 'Faith & Football' and walked the Great Wall of China to raise £100,000 for their cause. Other charitable causes he has been involved in are the Alpha course, a cinema advertisement about Christianity and the formation of a prayer group at Portsmouth. In 2007, he released his autobiography, titled Transformed, which details his conversion to Christianity.

Manchester City F.C.

Manchester City Football Club is an English football club based in Manchester, that competes in the Premier League, the top flight of English football. Founded in 1880 as St. Mark's (West Gorton), it became Ardwick Association Football Club in 1887 and Manchester City in 1894. The club's home ground is the City of Manchester Stadium in east Manchester, to which it moved in 2003, having played at Maine Road since 1923.

Manchester City entered the Football League in 1899, and won their first major honour with the FA Cup in 1904. It had its first major period of success in the late 1960s, winning the League, FA Cup and League Cup under the management of Joe Mercer and Malcolm Allison. After losing the 1981 FA Cup Final, the club went through a period of decline, culminating in relegation to the third tier of English football. Having regained their Premier League status in the early 2000s, Manchester City was purchased in 2008 by Abu Dhabi United Group for £210 million and received considerable financial investment.

The club have won six domestic league titles. Under the management of Pep Guardiola they won the Premier League in 2018 becoming the only Premier League team to attain 100 points in a single season. In 2019, they won four trophies, completing an unprecedented sweep of all domestic trophies in England and becoming the first English men's team to win the domestic treble. Manchester City's revenue was the fifth highest of a football club in the world in the 2017–18 season at €527.7 million. In 2018, Forbes estimated the club was the fifth most valuable in the world at $2.47 billion.

Ossie's Dream (Spurs Are on Their Way to Wembley)

"Ossie's Dream (Spurs Are On Their Way To Wembley)" is a single by the English football team Tottenham Hotspur, released as a souvenir to commemorate the team reaching the 1981 FA Cup Final. It was written by Dave Peacock of Chas & Dave and produced by the duo. The song reached number 5 in the UK Singles Chart after Tottenham won the FA Cup that year. It is still frequently chanted by Spurs supporters during matches. The B-side of the single is "Glory, Glory, Tottenham Hotspur".

Phil Boyer

Philip John "Phil" Boyer (born 25 January 1949) is an English former footballer who played for various clubs during his career, including Southampton, Norwich City, Bournemouth and Manchester City. He has the rare distinction of having played over 100 league games for four different clubs. He also made one appearance for England.

Ray Ranson

Raymond "Ray" Ranson (born 12 June 1960) is an English entrepreneur and a former professional footballer. He started his football career with Manchester City, and played for Birmingham City, Newcastle United and Reading. After his playing career ended in 1995, he went on to amass a multimillion-pound fortune from the sale of various sports-related businesses.

Steve MacKenzie

Steve MacKenzie (born 23 November 1961) is an English former footballer who played mostly as an attacking midfielder.

Tommy Caton

Thomas Stephen Caton (6 October 1962 – 30 April 1993) was an English footballer who played as a centre half for Manchester City, Arsenal, Oxford United and Charlton Athletic. Caton captained both Manchester City and Oxford United and was named as City's Player of the Year in 1982.

He made 14 appearances for the England under-21 team.

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