1979 Richmond WCT

The 1979 Richmond WCT, also known by its sponsored name United Virginia Bank Classic, was a men's tennis tournament played on indoor carpet courts in Richmond, Virginia, USA. The event was part WCT Tour which was incorporated into the 1979 Colgate-Palmolive Grand Prix circuit. It was the ninth edition of the tournament and was held from January 29 through February 4, 1979. First-seeded Björn Borg won the singles title.[3]

1979 Richmond WCT
DateJanuary 29 – February 4
Edition9th
CategoryGrand Prix (WCT)
Draw32S/16D
Prize money$175,000
SurfaceCarpet / Indoor
LocationRichmond, Virginia, USA
Champions
Singles
Sweden Björn Borg [1]
Doubles
United States Brian Gottfried / United States John McEnroe [2]

Champions

Men's Singles

Sweden Björn Borg defeated Argentina Guillermo Vilas 6–3, 6–1

Men's Doubles

United States Brian Gottfried / United States John McEnroe defeated Romania Ion Ţiriac / Argentina Guillermo Vilas 6–4, 6–3

References

  1. ^ "1979 Richmond – Men's Singles draw". www.atpworldtour.com. Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP).
  2. ^ "1979 Richmond – Men's Doubles draw". www.atpworldtour.com. Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP).
  3. ^ John Barrett, ed. (1980). World of Tennis 1980 : a BP yearbook. London: Queen Anne Press. p. 181. ISBN 9780362020120. OCLC 237184610.

External links

Björn Borg career statistics

This is a list of the main career statistics and records of professional tennis player Björn Borg.

Borg–McEnroe rivalry

The tennis players Björn Borg and John McEnroe met 14 times on the regular tour and 22 times in total, with their on-court rivalry highlighted by their contrasting temperaments and styles. Borg was known for his cool and emotionless demeanor on court, while McEnroe was famed for his court-side tantrums. Their rivalry extended between 1978 and 1981, with each player winning seven times against the other. Because of their contrasting personalities, their rivalry was described as "Fire and Ice".In 1980 McEnroe reached the men's singles final at Wimbledon for the first time, where he faced Borg, who was aiming for an Open Era record fifth consecutive Wimbledon title. At the start of the final McEnroe was booed by the crowd as he entered Centre Court following his heated exchanges with officials during his semi-final clash with Jimmy Connors. In a fourth set tie-breaker that lasted 20 minutes, McEnroe saved five match points (seven altogether in that set) and eventually won 18–16. However, he was unable to break Borg's serve in the fifth set and Borg went on to win 8–6. This match is widely considered one of the best tennis matches ever played. McEnroe defeated Borg at the US Open final the same year in five sets.

In 1981 McEnroe returned to Wimbledon and again faced Borg in the men's singles final. This time it was the American who prevailed and defeated Borg to end the Swede's run of 41 straight match victories at the All England Club. At the US Open in the same season, McEnroe was again victorious, winning in four sets, afterwards Borg walked off the court and out of the stadium before the ceremonies and press conference had begun. Borg retired shortly afterwards, having never won the US Open despite reaching four finals. Their final confrontation came in 1983 in Tokyo at the Suntory Cup (invitational tournament), with Borg prevailing 6–4, 2–6, 6–2.

In March 2006, when Bonhams Auction House in London announced that it would auction Borg's Wimbledon trophies and two of his winning rackets on 21 June 2006, McEnroe called from New York and told Borg, "What's up? Have you gone mad?" The conversation with McEnroe, along with pleas from Jimmy Connors and Andre Agassi, eventually persuaded Borg to buy out the trophies from Bonhams at an undisclosed amount.

Brian Gottfried

Brian Edward Gottfried (born January 27, 1952) is a retired American tennis player who won 25 singles titles and 54 doubles titles during his professional career. The right-hander was the runner-up at the 1977 French Open and achieved a career-high singles ranking on the ATP tour on June 19, 1977, when he became World No. 3.

John McEnroe career statistics

This is a list of the main career statistics of former tennis player John McEnroe.

McEnroe won a total of 155 ATP titles (a record for a male professional) during his career — 77 in singles, 78 in men's doubles, and 1 in mixed doubles (not counted as ATP title). He won seven Grand Slam singles titles. He also won a record eight year end championship titles overall, the Masters championships three times, and the WCT Finals, a record five times. His career singles match record was 875–198 (81.55%). He posted the best single-season match record (for a male player) in the Open Era with win-loss record: 82–3 (96.5%) set in 1984 and has the best carpet court career match winning percentage: 84.18% (411–65) of any player.

According to the ATP website, McEnroe had the edge in career matches on Jimmy Connors (20–14), Stefan Edberg (7–6), Mats Wilander (7–6), Michael Chang (4–1), Ilie Năstase (4–2), and Pat Cash (3–1). McEnroe was even with Björn Borg (7–7), Andre Agassi (2–2), and Michael Stich (1–1), but trailed against Pete Sampras (0–3), Goran Ivanišević (2–4), Boris Becker (2–8), Guillermo Vilas (5–6), Jim Courier (1–2), and Ivan Lendl (15–21). McEnroe won 12 of his last 14 matches with Connors, beginning with the 1983 Cincinnati tournament. Edberg won his last 5 matches with McEnroe, beginning with the 1989 tournament in Tokyo. McEnroe won 4 of his last 5 matches with Vilas, beginning with the 1981 tournament in Boca Raton, Florida. Lastly, Lendl won 11 of his last 12 matches with McEnroe, beginning with the 1985 US Open.

McEnroe, however, played in numerous events, including invitational tournaments, that are not covered by the ATP website. He won eight of those events and had wins and losses against the players listed in the preceding paragraph that are not reflected on the ATP website.

Grand Slam tournaments
Grand Prix circuit
Team events

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