1979 College Football All-America Team

The 1979 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1979. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes four selectors as "official" for the 1979 season. They are:[1] (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) based on the input of more than 2,000 voting members;[2] (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers;[3] (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) selected by the nation's football writers;[4] and (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers.[5] Other selectors included Football News (FN), the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA),[6] The Sporting News (TSN),[7] and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC).

Offense

Receivers

Tight ends

  • Junior Miller, Nebraska (AFCA, AP-1, FWAA, UPI-1, NEA-1, TSN, WC)
  • Mark Brammer, Michigan State (UPI-2)
  • Dave Young, Purdue (AP-2)
  • Mark Geisler, Ohio (NEA-2)
  • Benjie Pryor, Pittsburgh (AP-3)

Tackles

  • Greg Kolenda, Arkansas (AFCA, AP-1, FWAA, UPI-1, NEA-1, WC)
  • Jim Bunch, Alabama (AP-1, AFCA [G], FWAA, UPI-2)
  • Tim Foley, Notre Dame (AP-2, UPI-1, NEA-1, TSN)
  • Melvin Jones, Houston (AFCA, AP-3, WC)
  • Stan Brock, Colorado (NEA-2, TSN)
  • Steve McKenzie, Purdue (AP-2)
  • Irv Pankey, Penn State (NEA-2)
  • Ray Snell, Wisconsin (UPI-2)
  • Herman Parker, Long Beach State (AP-3)

Guards

  • Brad Budde, USC (AFCA, AP-1, FWAA, UPI-1, NEA-1, TSN, WC)
  • Ken Fritz, Ohio State (AP-1, FWAA, UPI-1, NEA-1, WC)
  • Ray Snell, Wisconsin (TSN)
  • Mike Brock, Alabama (AP-2)
  • Pete Inge, San Diego State (AP-2, UPI-2)
  • George Stewart, Arkansas (UPI-2)
  • Mark Jones, Missouri (NEA-2)
  • Mark Goodspeed, Nebraska (NEA-2)
  • Wayne Inman, East Carolina (AP-3)
  • Craig Wolfley, Syracuse (AP-3)

Centers

Quarterbacks

Running backs

Defense

Defensive ends

  • Hugh Green, Pittsburgh (AFCA, AP-1, FWAA, UPI-1, NEA-1, TSN, WC)
  • Curtis Greer, Michigan (AFCA, FWAA, UPI-2 [DT], NEA-1)
  • Jacob Green, Texas A&M (AP-1, UPI-2, WC)
  • Rick Antle, Oklahoma State (AP-2)
  • E. J. Junior, Alabama (AP-2)
  • John Adams, LSU (UPI-2)
  • Rush Brown, Ball State (NEA-2 [DL])
  • Gerry Gluscic, Indiana State (AP-3)
  • Bob Kohrs, Arizona State (AP-3)

Defensive tackles

Middle guards

  • Ron Simmons, Florida State (AFCA, AP-1, UPI-1, NEA-2, WC)
  • Ken Loushin, Purdue (AP-2)
  • Kerry Weinmaster, Nebraska (UPI-2)
  • George Mays, Army (AP-3)

Linebackers

Defensive backs

Special teams

Kickers

  • Dale Castro, Maryland (FWAA, UPI-1, NEA-1, TSN, WC)
  • Ish Ordonez, Arkansas (UPI-2, NEA-2)

Punters

  • Jim Miller, Ole Miss (FWAA, UPI-1, NEA-1, TSN, WC)
  • Mike Smith, Wyoming (UPI-2)
  • Ken Naber, Stanford (NEA-2)

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Football Award Winners" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). 2016. pp. 3, 12. Retrieved March 18, 2017.
  2. ^ a b "Football Coaches All America". The Republic (Columbus, Ind.). November 21, 1979. p. B3.
  3. ^ a b "Southern Cal star White repeats as All-America". The Pantagraph. December 5, 1979. p. B4.
  4. ^ a b Ted Gangi (ed.). "FWAA All-America Since 1944: The All-Time Team" (PDF). Retrieved March 2, 2016.
  5. ^ a b "UPI All-America: Trojans Grab 3 Berths". The Daily News (Huntingdon). December 4, 1979. p. 5.
  6. ^ a b "NEA's 1979 All-America football team". The Daily News (Huntingdon, PA). November 27, 1979. p. 4.
  7. ^ a b "Sporting News". The Arizona Republic. December 4, 1979. p. D2.
  8. ^ "Football Writers All America". The Republic (Columbus, Ind.). November 21, 1979. p. B3.
1979 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1979 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1979 NCAA Division I-A football season. The selectors for the 1979 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1979 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1979 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1979 Big Ten Conference football season.

1979 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1979 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific-10 Conference teams for the 1979 NCAA Division I-A football season.

1979 All-SEC football team

The 1979 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1979 NCAA Division I-A football season.

1979 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1979 Big Ten Conference football season was the 84th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1979 NCAA Division I-A football season.

The 1979 Ohio State Buckeyes football team compiled an 11–1 record, won the Big Ten championship, lost to USC in the 1980 Rose Bowl, and was ranked No. 4 in the final AP and UPI polls. Quarterback Art Schlichter led the team with 2,246 yards of total offense, finished fourth in the Heisman Trophy voting, and was selected as a first-team All-American by the NEA and The Sporting News. Offensive guard Ken Fritz was a consensus All-American. Earl Bruce, in his first year as head coach, was selected as the Big Ten Coach of the Year. Doug Donley led the Big Ten with 800 receiving yards, and Vlade Janakievski led the conference with 97 points scored. Defensive lineman Jim Laughlin was selected as the team's most valuable player.

The 1979 Purdue Boilermakers football team, under head coach Jim Young, finished in second place in the Big Ten, compiled a 10–2 record, defeated Tennessee in the 1979 Astro-Bluebonnet Bowl, led the conference in both scoring offense (32.5 points per game) and scoring defense (10.5 points allowed per game), and was ranked No. 10 in the final AP and UPI polls. Quarterback Mark Hermann led the conference with 2,377 passing yards and finished eighth in the Heisman Trophy voting. Tight end Dave Young was selected as the team's most valuable player.

The 1979 Michigan Wolverines football team, under head coach Bo Schembechler, compiled an 8–4 record, finished third in the Big Ten, lost to North Carolina in the 1979 Gator Bowl, and was ranked No. 18 in the final AP poll. Linebacker Ron Simpkins was selected as the team's most valuable player and as a consensus All-American. Defensive end Curtis Greer was also selected as a first-team All-American by multiple selectors. Butch Woolfolk ranked second in the Big Ten with 990 rushing yards.

1979 Indiana State Sycamores football team

The 1979 Indiana State Sycamores football team represented Indiana State University in the 1979 NCAA Division I-A football season. They were led by second-year head coach Dick Jamieson and played their home games at Memorial Stadium. They were a member of the Missouri Valley Conference. They finished the season 8–3, 3–2 in MVC play to finish in third place.

The roster included such standout performers as: Quarterback Reggie Allen, the 1979 MVC Offensive MVP; Defensive End Gerry Glusic, the 1979 MVC Defensive MVP; Defensive Back Alvin Reynolds; Linebacker Craig Shaffer, the 1981 MVC Defensive MVP; and Offensive Lineman Tunch Ilkin. Allen and Ilkin went on to long successful NFL careers, Reynolds as an assistant coach and Ilkin as a Pro Bowl-lineman for the Pittsburgh Steelers. Shaffer spent three seasons with the St. Louis CardinalsGlusic was named to the AP All-American Team. Six Sycamores would be named to the All-MVC Team: Quarterback Reggie Allen, Wide Receivers Kirk Wilson & Eddie Ruffin, Lineman George DeTella, Defensive End Gerry Glusic and Defensive Back John Allman.

Allen, Glusic and Ilkin have been inducted into the Indiana State University Athletics Hall of Fame.

Jim Bunch

Jim Bunch (born March 10, 1956) was an American football player and businessman. He played offensive guard for the University of Alabama Crimson Tide from 1976 through 1979 and was a member of the 1978 and 1979 national championship teams and a consensus selection to the 1979 College Football All-America Team. After his collegiate career, Bunch played one season as a semi-professional with the West Virginia Rockets. After his playing career ended, Bunch entered the hospitality business. Presently Bunch serves as an innkeeper at Winston Place, a bed and breakfast listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Valley Head, Alabama.

Ron Simpkins

Ronald Bernard "Ron" Simpkins (born April 2, 1958) is a former American football player. He played college football at the University of Michigan as an inside linebacker from 1976 to 1979. He became Michigan's all-time career tackle leader in 1979 and was a consensus first-team selection for the 1979 College Football All-America Team. He later played professional football in the National Football League (NFL) for the Cincinnati Bengals (1980, 1982-1986) and Green Bay Packers (1988).

1979 College Football All-America Team consensus selections
Offense
Defense
Special teams

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