1978 Pro Bowl

The 1978 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 28th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1977 season. The game was played on Monday, January 23, 1978, at Tampa Stadium in Tampa, Florida before a crowd of 50,716.[1] The final score was NFC 14, AFC 13.[2]

Ted Marchibroda of the Baltimore Colts lead the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Los Angeles Rams head coach Chuck Knox.[1] The referee was Fred Wyant.[1]

Walter Payton of the Chicago Bears was named the game's Most Valuable Player.[3] Players on the winning NFC team received $5,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $2,500.[4]

1978 NFL Pro Bowl
AFC NFC
13 14
Head coach:
Ted Marchibroda
(Baltimore Colts)
Head coach:
Chuck Knox
(Los Angeles Rams)
1234 Total
AFC 31000 13
NFC 0077 14
DateJanuary 23, 1978
StadiumTampa Stadium, Tampa, Florida
MVPWalter Payton (Chicago Bears)
RefereeFred Wyant
Attendance50,716
TV in the United States
NetworkABC
AnnouncersFrank Gifford, Howard Cosell & Don Meredith

References

  1. ^ a b c "1978 Pro Bowl game book" (PDF). NFL Game Statistics & Information. National Football League. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 30, 2012. Retrieved January 30, 2012.
  2. ^ Mizell, Hubert (January 24, 1978). "Stabler key to AFC's first-half raid". St. Petersburg Times. pp. 1C, 4C. Retrieved January 17, 2012.
  3. ^ "Writers pick Payton MVP". St. Petersburg Times. January 24, 1978. p. 1C. Retrieved January 17, 2012.
  4. ^ "NFL Pro Bowl history". CBSSports.com. Archived from the original on January 16, 2012. Retrieved January 16, 2012.

External links

1978 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1978 Philadelphia Eagles season was the franchise's 46th season in the National Football League (NFL) The Eagles reached the postseason for the first time in eighteen years, which ended the longest postseason drought in the franchise's history and one of the longest in the history of the NFL.

1979 Pro Bowl

The 1979 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 29th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1978 season. The game was played on Monday, January 29, 1979, at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California before a crowd of 38,333. The final score was NFC 13, AFC 7.Bum Phillips of the Houston Oilers lead the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Los Angeles Rams head coach Ray Malavasi. The referee was Jerry Markbreit in his second year as a referee.Ahmad Rashād of the Minnesota Vikings was named the game's Most Valuable Player. Players on the winning NFC team received $5,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $2,500.As of 2012 this was the last Pro Bowl to be played on a Monday, and the last one to be played in Los Angeles. It was the last one to be played outside Hawaii until the 2010 Pro Bowl which was in Miami Gardens, Florida.

This was also the first Pro Bowl to have players sport their respective team helmets, a custom that still stands today.

Dave Pear

David Pear (born June 1, 1953 in Vancouver, Washington) is a retired NFL football player. He was the first Tampa Bay Buccaneers player to be selected to the Pro Bowl and played in Super Bowl XV for the winning Oakland Raiders.

Through his football career, Pear suffered a number of injuries which required spinal surgery and hip replacement and have resulted in vertigo, memory loss and speech impairment.

He has also been quoted saying, "Don't let your kids play football. Never."

Efren Herrera

Efren Herrera (born July 30, 1951) is a former Mexican-American placekicker in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys, Seattle Seahawks and Buffalo Bills. He also was a member of the Oklahoma Outlaws in the United States Football League. He played college football at the University of California, Los Angeles.

List of Pro Bowl broadcasters

The following is a list of the television networks and announcers who have broadcast the National Football League's Pro Bowl throughout the years.

List of University of Houston people

The list of University of Houston people includes notable alumni, former students, and faculty of the University of Houston. Class years usually indicate the year of a graduation unless an entry is denoted by an asterisk (*). In this case, the student did not graduate from the university, and the class year indicates the last known year a former student attended. In the case of alumni with multiple graduation years, the earliest graduation year is shown.

List of first overall National Football League draft picks

This is a list of first overall National Football League draft picks. The National Football League draft is an annual sports draft in which NFL teams select newly eligible players for their rosters. To be eligible, a player must be out of high school at least three years. Each NFL franchise seeks to add new players through the annual NFL Draft. The draft rules were last updated in 2009. The team with the worst record the previous year picks first, the next-worst team second, and so on. Teams also have the option to trade with another team to move up to a better draft position. Teams that did not make the playoffs are ordered by their regular-season record, with any remaining ties broken by strength of schedule. Playoff participants are sequenced after non-playoff teams, based on their round of elimination (wild card, division, conference, and Super Bowl).From 1947 through 1958 the first selection was awarded by a random draw. The team which received this "bonus" pick forfeited its selection in the final round of the draft. The winner of the "bonus pick" was eliminated from the draw in future years. By 1958 all twelve clubs in the league at the time had received a bonus choice and the system was abolished.Before the merger agreements in 1966, the American Football League (AFL) operated in direct competition with the NFL and held a separate draft. This led to a massive bidding war over top prospects between the two leagues, along with the subsequent drafting of the same player in each draft. As part of the merger agreement on June 8, 1966, the two leagues held a multiple round "Common Draft". Once the AFL officially merged with the NFL in 1970, the "Common Draft" simply became the NFL Draft.Through the 2019 NFL Draft, 84 players have been selected first overall, with the most recent being Kyler Murray from the University of Oklahoma, following the 2018 NFL Draft when former teammate and Oklahoma Sooner quarterback, Baker Mayfield was also drafted first overall. The Indianapolis Colts – formerly the Baltimore Colts – have made the most first overall selections in history with seven. Of the first overall draft picks, 43 have been selected to a Pro Bowl and of those 43, twelve have been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. While the Heisman Trophy is awarded annually to the most outstanding player in U.S. college football, only 21 of those Heisman winners have been selected first overall in the NFL draft. Only five first overall draft pick players have been selected the NFL Rookie of the Year: Earl Campbell (1978); Billy Sims (1980); George Rogers (1981); Sam Bradford (2010); and Cam Newton (2011).

Mike Bell (defensive lineman)

Mike J. Bell (born August 30, 1957) is a former American college and professional football player who was a defensive end in the National Football League for twelve seasons during the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s. Bell played college football for Colorado State University, where he earned All-American honors. He was the second overall pick in the 1979 NFL Draft, and played for the NFL's Kansas City Chiefs for his entire professional career.

Bell was born in Wichita, Kansas, where he played multiple sports at Bishop Carroll Catholic High School from 1971 to 1975.

He attended Colorado State University, where he played for the Colorado State Rams football from 1975 to 1978. He was recognized as a consensus first-team All-American as a senior in 1978. His twin brother Mark Bell also played for Colorado State.

The Kansas City Chiefs chose Bell in the first round (second overall pick) in the 1979 NFL Draft, and he played for the Chiefs from 1979 to 1991, playing for four head coaches. During his twelve NFL seasons, he played in 135 games and started 100 of them, while compiling forty quarterback sacks and ten recovered fumbles.

Sam Cunningham

Samuel Lewis Cunningham Jr (born August 15, 1950) is a retired American football fullback. The media referred to him as Sam "Bam" Cunningham.

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