1978 Major League Baseball draft

In 1978, four American baseball players were promoted from amateur baseball to the major leagues, including Arizona State University third baseman Bob Horner, who was selected number one overall by the Atlanta Braves. Oakland High School pitchers Tim Conroy and Mike Morgan, and Brian Milner of Toronto also went directly to the big leagues.

In addition to Horner, the Braves also selected future major leaguers Matt Sinatro (2nd round), Steve Bedrosian (3rd round), Rick Behenna (4th round), Jose Alvarez (8th round) and Gerald Perry (11th round).

Others drafted in June 1978 included Lloyd Moseby and Dave Stieb (Toronto), Mike Marshall and Steve Sax (Los Angeles), Cal Ripken, Jr. and Mike Boddicker (Baltimore), Kirk Gibson (Detroit), Kent Hrbek (Minnesota) and Hubie Brooks (New York Mets).[1]

1978 Major League Baseball draft
Overview
First selectionBob Horner
Atlanta Braves
First round selections26

First round selections

The following are the first round picks in the 1978 Major League Baseball draft.[2]

= All-Star = Baseball Hall of Fame
Pick Player Team Position School
1 Bob Horner Atlanta Braves 3B Arizona State University
2 Lloyd Moseby Toronto Blue Jays 1B Oakland High School (Oakland, California)
3 Hubie Brooks New York Mets SS Arizona State University
4 Mike Morgan Oakland Athletics RHP Valley High School (Las Vegas, Nevada)
5 Andy Hawkins San Diego Padres RHP Midway High School (Hewitt, Texas)
6 Tito Nanni Seattle Mariners OF Chestnut Hill Academy High School (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
7 Bob Cummings San Francisco Giants C Brother Rice High School (Chicago, Illinois)
8 Nick Hernandez Milwaukee Brewers C Hialeah High School (Hialeah, Florida)
9 Glenn Franklin Montreal Expos SS Chipola Junior College
10 Phil Lansford Cleveland Indians SS Wilcox High School (Santa Clara, California)
11 Rod Boxberger Houston Astros RHP University of Southern California
12 Kirk Gibson Detroit Tigers OF Michigan State University
13 Bill Hayes Chicago Cubs C Indiana State University
14 Tom Brunansky California Angels OF West Covina High School (West Covina, California)
15 Robert Hicks St. Louis Cardinals 1B Tate High School (Pensacola, Florida)
16 Lenny Faedo Minnesota Twins SS Jefferson High School (Tampa, Florida)
17 Nick Esasky Cincinnati Reds SS Carol City High School (Carol City, Florida)
18 Rex Hudler New York Yankees[Compensation 1] SS Bullard High School (Fresno, California)
19 Brad Garnett Pittsburgh Pirates 1B DeSoto High School (DeSoto, Texas)
20 Tim Conroy Oakland Athletics[Compensation 2] LHP Gateway High School (Monroeville, Pennsylvania)
21 Gerry Aubin Pittsburgh Pirates[Compensation 3] OF Dougherty Comprehensive High School (Albany, Georgia)
22 Robert Boyce Baltimore Orioles 3B Deer Park High School (Cincinnati, Ohio)
23 Rip Rollins Philadelphia Phillies 1B-RHP Allegheny High School (Sparta, North Carolina)
24 Matt Winters New York Yankees[Compensation 4] OF Williamsville High School (Williamsville, New York)
25 Buddy Biancalana Kansas City Royals SS Redwood High School (Greenbrae, California)
26 Brian Ryder New York Yankees RHP Shrewsbury High School (Shrewsbury, Massachusetts)

Compensation picks

  1. ^ Pick from Chicago White Sox as compensation for signing of free agent Ron Blomberg
  2. ^ Pick from Texas Rangers as compensation for signing of free agent Mike Jorgensen
  3. ^ Pick from Los Angeles Dodgers as compensation for signing of free agent Terry Forster
  4. ^ Pick from Boston Red Sox as compensation for signing of free agent Mike Torrez

Other notable players

References

  1. ^ "Background on the 1978 MLB Draft". Archived from the original on 21 June 2008. Retrieved 2008-08-03.
  2. ^ "MLB First Round Draft Picks - 1978". Retrieved 2008-08-03.

External links

Preceded by
Harold Baines
1st Overall Picks
Bob Horner
Succeeded by
Al Chambers
1977 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.From 1947 to 1980, the American Baseball Coaches Association was the only All-American selector recognized by the NCAA.

1978 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each team position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete together as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889.From 1947 to 1980, the American Baseball Coaches Association was the only All-American selector recognized by the NCAA.

1978 Detroit Tigers season

The 1978 Detroit Tigers finished in fifth place in the American League East with a record of 86-76, 13½ games behind the Yankees. They outscored their opponents 714 to 653.

1978 Minnesota Twins season

The 1978 Minnesota Twins finished 73-89, fourth in the American League West.

1978 Montreal Expos season

The 1978 Montreal Expos season was the tenth season in franchise history. The team finished fourth in the National League East with a record of 76-86, 14 games behind the first-place Philadelphia Phillies.

1978 New York Mets season

The 1978 New York Mets season was the 17th regular season for the Mets, who played their home games at Shea Stadium. Led by manager Joe Torre, the team had a 66–96 record and finished in sixth place in the National League East.

1978 San Diego Padres season

The 1978 San Diego Padres season was the tenth in franchise history. The team finished in fourth place in the National League West with a record of 84-78, 11 games behind the first-place Los Angeles Dodgers. This was the Padres' first winning season in franchise history.

Bill Lucas (baseball)

William DeVaughn Lucas (January 25, 1936 – May 5, 1979) was the first African-American general manager in Major League Baseball as front-office boss of the Atlanta Braves from mid-September 1976 until his death in early May 1979. A member of the Braves' organization for 23 years, he was inducted into the Braves Hall of Fame in 2006.

Lucas was born in Jacksonville, Florida. A graduate of Florida A&M University, he served as an officer in the United States Army. He then signed as an infielder with the Milwaukee Braves in 1957 and played for six seasons in the club's farm system, batting .273 in 655 games. He joined the Braves' front office in 1965, working in sales and promotions during the team's relocation to Atlanta before he switched to the player development department in 1967. Lucas was named the director of the Braves' farm system in 1972 and promoted to GM responsibilities on September 17, 1976. At the time, the Braves were in last place in the National League West Division, 30​1⁄2 games out of the division lead. Lucas' official title was vice president of player personnel, but owner Ted Turner gave him all the duties of a general manager.

With players like Dale Murphy coming up through Lucas' minor league system, and the selection of Bob Horner as the top pick in the 1978 Major League Baseball Draft, the Braves began assembling the team that would win the 1982 division title.

But the job of rebuilding the Braves was compounded by Turner's tempestuous behavior. On May 11, 1977, the owner appointed himself the Braves' field manager during a losing streak. His dugout reign drew national headlines but lasted only one day before the president of the National League ruled that Turner, as an owner, could not appoint himself manager. Then, starting in 1978, Lucas found himself caught between Turner and players like rookie Horner and veteran pitcher Phil Niekro, a future Hall of Famer, during contentious contract negotiations.On the evening of May 1, 1979, with the Braves on the road facing the Pittsburgh Pirates at Three Rivers Stadium, Lucas watched on television from his Atlanta home as Niekro won his 200th Major League game, 5–2. Hours after congratulating Niekro by phone, Lucas was stricken with cardiac arrest and a massive cerebral hemorrhage. He died three days later without regaining consciousness at age 43. At his passing, he was still the highest-ranking black executive in professional baseball.Said Murphy at Lucas' funeral: "Bill's dream was for this organization to become a success. It is our sacred honor to be chosen to fulfill his dream."His widow, Rubye, later served on the board of directors of the Turner Broadcasting System and as president of the William D. Lucas Fund, which helps send young baseball players to college. Lucas' sister, Barbara, was the former wife of Braves' Hall of Famer and home run king Henry Aaron. The two were married from 1953 to 1971.

Brian Giles (second baseman)

Brian Jeffrey Giles (born April 27, 1960) is a former Major League Baseball player. Drafted in the third round of the 1978 Major League Baseball Draft by the New York Mets, Giles reached the major leagues in 1981 and played for the Mets until 1983. In 1984, he was drafted by the Milwaukee Brewers in the rule 5 draft. He played 34 games with the Brewers in 1985 before signing with the Chicago White Sox as a free agent. He played only 9 games for the White Sox, and would not reappear in the Majors until a brief 45-game stint with the Seattle Mariners in 1990. He played his last game with the Mariners on July 7, 1990. Giles played primarily second base and shortstop.

Giles' grandfather, George Giles, was an All-Star first baseman for the Kansas City Monarchs of the Negro National League in the late 1920s.

Craig Chamberlain

Craig Phillip Chamberlain (born February 2, 1957 in Hollywood, California) is an American former professional baseball player. A pitcher, he appeared in 15 games, including ten starts, in Major League Baseball for the Kansas City Royals in 1979 and 1980. As a rookie with the 1979 Royals, Chamberlain threw three complete game victories in his first three Major League appearances.

Chamberlain was drafted in the first round of the secondary phase of the 1978 Major League Baseball draft after attending Long Beach City College and the University of Arizona. The 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m), 190 lb (86 kg) right-hander made his professional debut in 1979 at the Double-A level and won 12 of 21 decisions, with 11 complete games and a sparkling 2.59 earned run average. In August 1979, the Royals summoned him to the Major Leagues and he made his first start on August 12.

Dave Valle

David Valle (; born October 30, 1960) is an American former professional baseball player. He played as a catcher in Major League Baseball for the Seattle Mariners, Boston Red Sox, Milwaukee Brewers, and Texas Rangers from 1984 to 1996. He attended Holy Cross High School in Flushing, NY. In 1995, Valle founded Esperanza International, a microfinance-plus organization that serves families in poverty in the Dominican Republic.

Don Cooper

Donald James Cooper (born January 15, 1956) is a former pitcher in Major League Baseball (MLB) who spent parts of four seasons with the Minnesota Twins (1981–1982), Toronto Blue Jays (1983) and New York Yankees (1985). He has been the pitching coach of the Chicago White Sox since July 22, 2002. Under his tutelage, both Mark Buehrle and Philip Humber pitched perfect games (with the former also getting a no-hitter), and the White Sox won the 2005 World Series.

Hubie Brooks

Hubert "Hubie" Brooks (born September 24, 1956) is an American former professional baseball right fielder, third baseman, and shortstop. He played fifteen seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1980 to 1994 for the New York Mets, Montreal Expos, Los Angeles Dodgers, California Angels, and Kansas City Royals. Brooks was selected third overall in the 1978 Major League Baseball draft by the New York Mets and went on to play for five different teams over a 15-year career, and was twice named an All-Star. MLB pitcher Donnie Moore, who died in 1989, was Brooks' cousin.

Jerry Ujdur

Gerald Raymond Ujdur (born March 5, 1957) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. Ujdur pitched in all or part of five seasons from 1980 through 1984.

Ujdur played college baseball for the Minnesota Golden Gophers. He was selected by the Detroit Tigers in the fourth round of the 1978 Major League Baseball Draft, and began his career with the Lakeland Tigers that year, finishing with a 5-2 win-loss record and a 2.39 earned run average (ERA). After pitching in 19 games for the Montgomery Rebels in 1979, he started the 1980 season with the Evansville Triplets. He went 9-4 with a 3.37 ERA before he was promoted to the main Tigers roster.Ujdur made his debut on August 17, 1980, and finished the season with a win and a 7,59 ERA in nine games. In 1981, he pitched in four games for the Tigers, but spent most of the year with Evansville, where he had a 7-10 record and a 4.09 ERA in 25 starts. Ujdur spent 1982 as a starter for the Tigers for most of the season. That year, he had a 10-10 record and a 3.69 ERA and finished second in the American League in hits per nine innings with 7.58. He was also named Tigers' rookie pitcher of the year. After a couple of poor starts to begin 1983, the Tigers placed him back in the minors. The following year after spring training, the Tigers released him, and he was picked up by the Indians; he was nearly not able to join a team due to how late in spring the Tigers cut him.He began the 1984 season with the Maine Guides and spent most of the season there, going 14-8 with a 3.69 ERA, which led to the Indians calling him up in September. With the Indians, he had a 1-2 record and a 6.91 ERA in four games. He was released by the Indians in March 1985, and retired from the game afterwards.

John Martin (baseball)

John Robert Martin (born April 11, 1956) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher.

Martin attended Eastern Michigan University (EMU). He was a member of the 1976 and 1977 Mid-American Conference (MAC) Championship EMU teams. Martin is also a member of the EMU Hall of Fame.The Detroit Tigers drafted Martin in the 27th round of the 1978 Major League Baseball Draft. The Tigers traded him to the St. Louis Cardinals with Al Greene for Jim Lentine on June 2, 1980.

After appearing in 9 games, starting 5, and winning 2 in his rookie year of 1980, with the St. Louis Cardinals, Martin recorded his best year in 1981, recording 8 wins against 5 losses, four complete games, and a 3.42 earned run average (ERA). In 1982, after a subpar start with a sore arm, he only started in 7 games, and finished the season mostly out of the bullpen (4–5, 4.23 ERA). Martin adjusted to pitching in relief and bounced back with a 3–1 record and 4.18 ERA. The Cardinals sold him to the Detroit Tigers on August 4, 1983. For the Tigers, Martin appeared in 15 games and had a 7.43 ERA.

Marty Castillo

Martin Horace Castillo (born January 16, 1957) is an American former Major League Baseball third baseman and catcher. Castillo, who is of Mexican descent, is an alumnus of Savanna High School in Anaheim, California.

Drafted by the Detroit Tigers in the fifth round of the 1978 Major League Baseball Draft, Castillo made his Major League Baseball debut with the Detroit Tigers on August 19, 1981. Castillo played in only seven games combined in the 1981 and 1982 seasons, but saw more frequent action in 1983, playing in 67 games.Castillo had his best statistical season as a member of the Tigers team that defeated the San Diego Padres in the 1984 World Series. Castillo played 33 games at third base and 36 at catcher for the 1984 Tigers. He had career highs in 1984, including a .234 batting average, 33 hits, 11 extra base hits, and 17 runs batted in (RBIs). On August 26, 1984, Castillo went 3-for-4 and scored three runs in a victory over the Angels. On September 23, 1984, Castillo went 2-for-3, including a home run and two RBIs, to help the Tigers win their 100th game of the season – a 4–1 victory over the New York Yankees.

Castillo played well in the post-season. He had two RBIs in the 1984 American League Championship Series, including the game-winning, pennant-clinching RBI in Game 3, knocking in Chet Lemon for a 1–0 victory, sending the Tigers to the World Series. Castillo also caught the ball at third base for the final out of the pennant-clinching game in 1984. An article in The Detroit News several years ago questioned whether Castillo still had the ball.Castillo continued his strong hitting in the 1984 World Series, batting .333 with a .455 on-base percentage and a .667 slugging percentage. He had nine at bats in the World Series and had three hits, two runs scored, two walks, two RBIs, and a home run. What Castillo called "the greatest feeling of my life" came in Game 3 of the World Series, when he hit a two-run home run. With a count of one ball and two strikes, Castillo hit a fastball into the left field upper deck. He said of his reaction that "I wanted to do a couple of cartwheels, a backflip and a roundoff." Castillo was also on base in Game 5 (the final game) when Kirk Gibson hit a three-run home run in the bottom of the eighth inning off Goose Gossage.

In a 1984 Sports Illustrated article, Castillo was described as "an outgoing practical joker" and "one of the more popular Tigers." The article noted that Castillo was "so nice that Tom Monaghan, owner of the club and Domino's Pizza, doesn't object to Castillo's endorsing Little Caesars Pizza." When asked by Sports Illustrated if he would gain other endorsements as a result of his World Series home run, Castillo responded, "I'm not going to worry about it. But my new phone number is ..."Castillo played his last major league game with the Tigers on October 5, 1985.

Matt Sinatro

Matthew Stephen Sinatro (born March 22, 1960 in Hartford, Connecticut) is an American former professional baseball player, coach and scout. A catcher during his playing days, he appeared in 140 games over ten seasons in Major League Baseball for four different clubs: the Atlanta Braves (1981–84), Oakland Athletics (1987–88), Detroit Tigers (1989) and Seattle Mariners (1990–92), and had a 15-year career as a big-league coach.

Sinatro was listed as 5 feet 9 inches (1.75 m) tall and 174 pounds (79 kg); he threw and batted right-handed. After graduating from Conard High School in West Hartford, he was selected by the Braves in the second round of the 1978 Major League Baseball Draft. He was the 27th player chosen overall, 21 slots ahead of eventual Baseball Hall of Famer Cal Ripken, Jr.

But offensive struggles (he batted only .245 during a 1,044-game minor league career) hindered Sinatro's development. He was never a regular player in the big leagues, nor did he play in more than 37 games in any MLB season. His 48 career big-league hits included six doubles, one triple, and one home run, a two-run blow off Pete Falcone of the New York Mets on August 27, 1982. The homer contributed to a 9–8 Atlanta victory in a year when the Braves prevailed over the Los Angeles Dodgers to win the National League West Division championship by a single game.After drawing his release from the Mariners in October 1992, Sinatro was Seattle's MLB advance scout in 1993–94 before joining the big-league coaching staff of manager Lou Piniella. He would spend his entire coaching career working for Piniella as bullpen coach, first-base coach or special assistant with the Mariners, Tampa Bay Devil Rays and Chicago Cubs. In 2012, he served the Houston Astros as catching coordinator and advance scout.

Mike Fitzgerald (catcher)

Michael Roy Fitzgerald (born July 13, 1960) is an American former professional baseball player. He played as a catcher in Major League Baseball from 1983 through 1992 for the New York Mets, Montreal Expos and California Angels.

Mike Witt

Michael Atwater Witt (born July 20, 1960) is a former professional baseball pitcher. He played all or part of twelve seasons in Major League Baseball between 1981 and 1993, and threw the eleventh perfect game in MLB history in 1984.

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