1978–79 FA Cup

The FA Cup 1978–79 was the 98th staging of the world's oldest football knockout competition, The Football Association Challenge Cup, or FA Cup. The final saw Arsenal beat Manchester United 3–2, three of the five goals being scored in the last five minutes.

1978–79 FA Cup
Country England
 Wales
Defending championsIpswich Town
ChampionsArsenal (5th title)
Runners-upManchester United

First round proper

The first round of games were played on 25 November 1978. Replays were played mainly on 28–29 November, with two on 5–6 December.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Blackpool 2–1 Lincoln City 25 November 1978
2 Chester 1–1 Runcorn 25 November 1978
Replay Runcorn 0–5 Chester 28 November 1978
3 Darlington 1–1 Chesterfield 25 November 1978
Replay Chesterfield 0–1 Darlington 6 December 1978
4 Dartford 1–2 AP Leamington 25 November 1978
5 Bournemouth 2–1 Hitchin Town 25 November 1978
6 Barnet 3–3 Woking 25 November 1978
Replay Woking 3–3 Barnet 28 November 1978
Replay Woking 3–0 Barnet 5 December 1978
7 Rochdale 0–1 Droylsden 25 November 1978
8 Watford 3–0 Dagenham 25 November 1978
9 Yeovil Town 0–1 Barking 25 November 1978
10 Reading 0–0 Gillingham 25 November 1978
Replay Gillingham 1–2 Reading 28 November 1978
11 Walsall 0–2 Torquay United 25 November 1978
12 Swindon Town 2–0 March Town United 25 November 1978
13 Doncaster Rovers 2–1 Huddersfield Town 25 November 1978
14 Tranmere Rovers 2–1 Boston United 25 November 1978
15 Stockport County 5–1 Morecambe 25 November 1978
16 Chorley 0–1 Scarborough 25 November 1978
17 Barnsley 5–1 Worksop Town 25 November 1978
18 Maidstone United 1–0 Wycombe Wanderers 25 November 1978
19 Portsmouth 2–0 Northampton Town 25 November 1978
20 Bradford City 1–0 Port Vale 25 November 1978
21 Hull City 2–1 Stafford Rangers 25 November 1978
22 Carlisle United 1–0 Halifax Town 25 November 1978
23 Worcester City 2–0 Plymouth Argyle 25 November 1978
24 Altrincham 4–3 Southport 25 November 1978
25 Southend United 3–2 Peterborough United 25 November 1978
26 Exeter City 1–0 Brentford 25 November 1978
27 Scunthorpe United 1–1 Sheffield Wednesday 25 November 1978
Replay Sheffield Wednesday 1–0 Scunthorpe United 28 November 1978
28 Mansfield Town 0–2 Shrewsbury Town 25 November 1978
29 Wealdstone 0–5 Enfield 25 November 1978
30 York City 1–1 Blyth Spartans 25 November 1978
Replay Blyth Spartans 3–5 York City 28 November 1978
31 Hereford United 0–1 Newport County 25 November 1978
32 Rotherham United 3–0 Workington 25 November 1978
33 Aldershot 1–1 Weymouth 25 November 1978
Replay Weymouth 0–2 Aldershot 29 November 1978
34 Wigan Athletic 2–2 Bury 25 November 1978
Replay Bury 4–1 Wigan Athletic 28 November 1978
35 Colchester United 4–2 Oxford United 25 November 1978
36 Nuneaton Borough 0–2 Crewe Alexandra 25 November 1978
37 Gravesend & Northfleet 0–0 Wimbledon 25 November 1978
Replay Wimbledon 1–0 Gravesend & Northfleet 28 November 1978
38 Leatherhead 2–1 Merthyr Tydfil 25 November 1978
39 Swansea City 4–1 Hillingdon Borough 25 November 1978
40 Hartlepool United 1–0 Grimsby Town 25 November 1978

Second round proper

The second round of games were played on 16 December 1978. Replays took place mainly on 18–19 with one on 28 December and another on 9 January 1979.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Darlington 2–1 Chester 16 December 1978
2 Barking 1–2 Aldershot 16 December 1978
3 Bury 3–1 Blackpool 16 December 1978
4 Watford 1–1 Southend United 16 December 1978
Replay Southend United 1–0 Watford 18 December 1978
5 Crewe Alexandra 0–1 Hartlepool United 16 December 1978
6 Swindon Town 3–0 Enfield 16 December 1978
7 Doncaster Rovers 0–3 Shrewsbury Town 16 December 1978
8 Tranmere Rovers 1–1 Sheffield Wednesday 16 December 1978
Replay Sheffield Wednesday 4–0 Tranmere Rovers 19 December 1978
9 Stockport County 4–2 Bradford City 16 December 1978
10 Barnsley 1–1 Rotherham United 16 December 1978
Replay Rotherham United 2–1 Barnsley 9 January 1979
11 Maidstone United 1–0 Exeter City 16 December 1978
12 Portsmouth 0–1 Reading 16 December 1978
13 Carlisle United 3–0 Hull City 16 December 1978
14 Wimbledon 1–1 Bournemouth 16 December 1978
Replay Bournemouth 1–2 Wimbledon 28 December 1978
15 Newport County 0–0 Worcester City 16 December 1978
Replay Worcester City 1–2 Newport County 18 December 1978
16 York City 3–0 Scarborough 16 December 1978
17 Droylsden 0–2 Altrincham 16 December 1978
18 Leatherhead 1–1 Colchester United 16 December 1978
Replay Colchester United 4–0 Leatherhead 19 December 1978
19 Swansea City 2–2 Woking 16 December 1978
Replay Woking 3–5 Swansea City 19 December 1978
20 AP Leamington 0–1 Torquay United 16 December 1978

Third round proper

The third round of games in the FA Cup were intended to be played on 6 January 1979, but only four games were actually played on this date. Twenty more ties were played midweek over 8–10 January with a few more taking place on 15–16 and one on 18 January. Replays were intended for the 9–10 January but again took place at various times.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Darlington 0–1 Colchester United 9 January 1979
2 Bristol City 3–1 Bolton Wanderers 9 January 1979
3 Preston North End 3–0 Derby County 16 January 1979
4 Leicester City 3–0 Norwich City 6 January 1979
5 Notts County 4–2 Reading 9 January 1979
6 Nottingham Forest 2–0 Aston Villa 10 January 1979
7 Blackburn Rovers 2–1 Millwall 10 January 1979
8 Sheffield Wednesday 1–1 Arsenal 6 January 1979
Replay Arsenal 1–1 Sheffield Wednesday 9 January 1979
Replay Sheffield Wednesday 2–2 Arsenal 15 January 1979
Replay Arsenal 3–3 Sheffield Wednesday 17 January 1979
Replay Sheffield Wednesday 0–2 Arsenal 22 January 1979
9 Middlesbrough 1–1 Crystal Palace 9 January 1979
Replay Crystal Palace 1–0 Middlesbrough 15 January 1979
10 Sunderland 2–1 Everton 10 January 1979
11 Swindon Town 3–0 Cardiff City 9 January 1979
12 Shrewsbury Town 3–1 Cambridge United 6 January 1979
13 Wrexham 6–2 Stockport County 1 February 1979
14 Sheffield United 0–0 Aldershot 9 January 1979
Replay Aldershot 1–0 Sheffield United 15 January 1979
15 Ipswich Town 3–2 Carlisle United 10 January 1979
16 Newcastle United 3–1 Torquay United 16 January 1979
17 Tottenham Hotspur 1–1 Altrincham 10 January 1979
Replay Altrincham 0–3 Tottenham Hotspur 16 January 1979
18 Manchester City 0–0 Rotherham United 15 January 1979
Replay Rotherham United 2–4 Manchester City 17 January 1979
19 Fulham 2–0 Queens Park Rangers 9 January 1979
20 Coventry City 2–2 West Bromwich Albion 9 January 1979
Replay West Bromwich Albion 4–0 Coventry City 15 January 1979
21 Brighton & Hove Albion 2–3 Wolverhampton Wanderers 9 January 1979
22 Manchester United 3–0 Chelsea 15 January 1979
23 Wimbledon 0–2 Southampton 9 January 1979
24 Southend United 0–0 Liverpool 10 January 1979
Replay Liverpool 3–0 Southend United 17 January 1979
25 Newport County 2–1 West Ham United 9 January 1979
26 Charlton Athletic 1–1 Maidstone United 9 January 1979
Replay Maidstone United 1–2 Charlton Athletic 15 January 1979
27 York City 2–0 Luton Town 9 January 1979
28 Stoke City 0–1 Oldham Athletic 17 January 1979
29 Birmingham City 0–2 Burnley 6 January 1979
30 Orient 3–2 Bury 9 January 1979
31 Swansea City 0–1 Bristol Rovers 8 January 1979
32 Hartlepool United 2–6 Leeds United 18 January 1979

Fourth round proper

The fourth round of games were intended to be played over the weekend 26–27 January 1979, but by this time only eight matches had been played, of which three went to replays. The other games were completed either midweek on 29–31st, or on 5 or 12 February. Replays were played at various times after the initial games.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Burnley 1–1 Sunderland 21 February 1979
Replay Sunderland 0–3 Burnley 26 February 1979
2 Liverpool 1–0 Blackburn Rovers 30 January 1979
3 Preston North End 0–1 Southampton 12 February 1979
4 Nottingham Forest 3–1 York City 27 January 1979
5 West Bromwich Albion 3–3 Leeds United 26 February 1979
Replay West Bromwich Albion 2–0 Leeds United 1 March 1979
6 Shrewsbury Town 2–0 Manchester City 27 January 1979
7 Ipswich Town 0–0 Orient 27 January 1979
Replay Orient 0–2 Ipswich Town 30 January 1979
8 Newcastle United 1–1 Wolverhampton Wanderers 27 January 1979
Replay Wolverhampton Wanderers 1–0 Newcastle United 22 February 1979
9 Tottenham Hotspur 3–3 Wrexham 12 February 1979
Replay Wrexham 2–3 Tottenham Hotspur 21 February 1979
10 Fulham 1–1 Manchester United 31 January 1979
Replay Manchester United 1–0 Fulham 12 February 1979
11 Bristol Rovers 1–0 Charlton Athletic 5 February 1979
12 Oldham Athletic 3–1 Leicester City 26 February 1979
13 Crystal Palace 3–0 Bristol City 29 January 1979
14 Newport County 0–0 Colchester United 30 January 1979
Replay Colchester United 1–0 Newport County 5 February 1979
15 Arsenal 2–0 Notts County 27 January 1979
16 Aldershot 2–1 Swindon Town 30 January 1979

Fifth round proper

The fifth set of games were played on either the 20th, 26th or 28 February, or the 10 March 1979. Two replays were played on 26 February and 12 March.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Liverpool 3–0 Burnley 28 February 1979
2 Nottingham Forest 0–1 Arsenal 26 February 1979
3 West Bromwich Albion 1–1 Southampton 10 March 1979
Replay Southampton 2–1 West Bromwich Albion 12 March 1979
4 Ipswich Town 6–1 Bristol Rovers 26 February 1979
5 Oldham Athletic 0–1 Tottenham Hotspur 28 February 1979
6 Crystal Palace 0–1 Wolverhampton Wanderers 26 February 1979
7 Aldershot 2–2 Shrewsbury Town 20 February 1979
Replay Shrewsbury Town 3–1 Aldershot 26 February 1979
8 Colchester United 0–1 Manchester United 20 February 1979

Sixth round proper

The sixth round of FA Cup games were played on 10 March 1979, except for the Southampton–Arsenal match which began on 19 March. There were three replays.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Southampton 1–1 Arsenal 19 March 1979
Replay Arsenal 2–0 Southampton 21 March 1979
2 Wolverhampton Wanderers 1–1 Shrewsbury Town 10 March 1979
Replay Shrewsbury Town 1–3 Wolverhampton Wanderers 13 March 1979
3 Ipswich Town 0–1 Liverpool 10 March 1979
4 Tottenham Hotspur 1–1 Manchester United 10 March 1979
Replay Manchester United 2–0 Tottenham Hotspur 14 March 1979

Semi finals

Manchester United2–2Liverpool
Jordan Goal
B. Greenhoff Goal
Dalglish Goal
Hansen Goal
Arsenal2–0Wolverhampton Wanderers
Stapleton Goal
Sunderland Goal

Replay

Liverpool0–1Manchester United
J. Greenhoff Goal

Final

Arsenal3–2Manchester United
Talbot Goal 12'
Stapleton Goal 43'
Sunderland Goal 89'
(Report) McQueen Goal 86'
McIlroy Goal 88'
Arsenal
Manchester United

Television Coverage

The right to show FA Cup games were, as with Football League matches, shared between the BBC and ITV network. All games were shown in a highlights format, except the Final, which was shown live both on BBC1 & ITV. The BBC football highlights programme Match Of The Day would show up to three games and the various ITV regional network stations would cover up to one game and show highlights from other games covered elsewhere on the ITV network. No games from Rounds 1 or 2 were shown. Occasional highlights of replays would be shown on either the BBC or ITV.[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8]

These matches were.

Round BBC1 ITV
Third round proper Leicester City v Norwich City 1
Shrewsbury Town v Cambridge United
Southend United v Liverpool 2
Sheffield Wednesday v ArsenalYorkshire 1
Stoke City v Oldham AthleticATV (abandoned) 1
Fourth round proper Shrewsbury Town v Manchester City 1
Arsenal v Notts County 1
Newcastle United v Wolverhampton Wanderers – Yorkshire 1
Nottingham Forest v York City – ATV
Ipswich Town v OrientAnglia 1
Fulham v Manchester United 3
Manchester United v Fulham 3 (Replay)
Wrexham v Tottenham Hotspur 3 (Replay)
Fifth round proper Nottingham Forest v Arsenal2
Sixth round proper Manchester United v Tottenham Hotspur 1,2 (Replay) Wolverhampton Wanderers v Shrewsbury Town – ATV 1
Tottenham Hotspur v Manchester UnitedLWT
Semi-finals Arsenal v Wolverhampton Wanderers
Liverpool v Manchester United2 (Replay) 1
Manchester United vs LiverpoolGranada 1
Final Arsenal vs Manchester United 1 Arsenal vs Manchester United 1

1Footage available on YouTube
2featured on Sportsnight
3featured on Midweek Sports Special

References

  1. ^ "MOTD Listings 1978–79".
  2. ^ "The Big Match". Archived from the original on 11 May 2013.
  3. ^ "Kick Off Match". Archived from the original on 27 January 2009.
  4. ^ "Shoot (Tyne Tees)". Archived from the original on 26 January 2013. Retrieved 7 March 2013.
  5. ^ "Yorkshire ITV Football". Archived from the original on 11 May 2013. Retrieved 7 March 2013.
  6. ^ "Star Soccer". Archived from the original on 11 May 2013.
  7. ^ "Match of the Week". Archived from the original on 11 May 2013. Retrieved 7 March 2013.
  8. ^ "Mid-Week Football". Archived from the original on 24 April 2013. Retrieved 7 March 2013.

External links

1978–79 Birmingham City F.C. season

The 1978–79 Football League season was Birmingham City Football Club's 76th in the Football League and their 45th in the First Division. They were in the bottom two positions in the 22-team division from 9 September onwards, eventually finishing 21st position, so were relegated to the Second Division for 1979–80. They lost in their opening matches in both the 1978–79 FA Cup and the League Cup, eliminated by Burnley and Southampton respectively.

Twenty-seven players made at least one appearance in nationally organised first-team competition, and there were thirteen different goalscorers. Defender Joe Gallagher played in every game but one over the season, and Alan Buckley was the club's top scorer with 8 goals, all scored in the league. Jim Smith, in his first full season as Birmingham's manager, brought Argentina's World Cup-winning full-back Alberto Tarantini to the club.Trevor Francis, who joined Birmingham as a 15-year-old, became the first British footballer to be transferred for a fee of at least £1 million when Brian Clough signed him for league champions Nottingham Forest in February 1979. The basic fee was below £1m – Clough claimed in his autobiography to have set the fee at £999,999 because he did not want the idea of being the first £1m player going to Francis's head – but VAT and the transfer levy raised the total payable to £1.18m. Within three months he scored the winning goal in the 1979 European Cup Final.

1978–79 FA Cup qualifying rounds

The FA Cup 1978–79 is the 98th season of the world's oldest football knockout competition; The Football Association Challenge Cup, or FA Cup for short. The large number of clubs entering the tournament from lower down the English football league system meant that the competition started with a number of preliminary and qualifying rounds. The 30 victorious teams from the Fourth Round Qualifying progressed to the First Round Proper.

1979 FA Charity Shield

The 1979 FA Charity Shield was the 57th Charity Shield, an annual English football match played between the winners of the previous season's Football League and FA Cup. It was held at Wembley Stadium on 11 August 1979. The match was contested by Liverpool, champions of the 1978–79 Football League and Arsenal, who beat Manchester United in the final of the 1978–79 FA Cup. Watched by a crowd of 92,800, Liverpool won the match 3–1.

This was Arsenal's tenth Charity Shield appearance and Liverpool's ninth. Arsenal made no changes to the first team which played in the FA Cup Final the previous season, whereas for Liverpool new signing Avi Cohen started on the bench. In the match Liverpool took the lead in the 38th minute when Terry McDermott scored past goalkeeper Pat Jennings. They extended their lead through Kenny Dalglish in the 63rd minute before McDermott added his second two minutes later. Alan Sunderland scored a consolation for Arsenal late on.

1979 FA Cup Final

The 1979 FA Cup Final was a football match played on 12 May 1979 at Wembley Stadium. The match was contested by Arsenal and Manchester United. It is regarded as one of the greatest-ever finishes in an FA Cup final. For over 85 minutes the game had been unremarkable, with Arsenal taking a 2–0 half time lead through goals from Brian Talbot and Frank Stapleton. In the 86th minute, however, Gordon McQueen scored following a set-piece, and two minutes later Sammy McIlroy dribbled past two Arsenal players to score a dramatic equaliser. With the game poised for extra time, United's celebrations proved short-lived, as Alan Sunderland scored a last-minute winner, making the final result Arsenal 3–2 Manchester United. This match is often referred to as the "Five-minute Final".

The 1979 FA Cup was the only major trophy that Arsenal won during the seven-year management of Terry Neill, who was appointed in 1976 after Bertie Mee's retirement. He was dismissed in 1983.

It was also the only cup final that Manchester United reached under the management of Dave Sexton, who had been appointed as manager in 1977 and remained there until 1981 when he was sacked having failed to bring a major trophy to the club.

Barnsley F.C.

Barnsley Football Club is a professional association football club based in the town of Barnsley, South Yorkshire, England. The team play in the Championship, the second tier of the English football league system. Nicknamed "the Tykes", they were founded in 1887 by Reverend Tiverton Preedy under the name Barnsley St. Peter's. The club's colours were originally blue, but were converted to red and white in 1904 and have played in those colours ever since. Their home ground since 1888 has been Oakwell.

Barnsley won the FA Cup in 1911–12 and were also runners-up in 1909–10. The club won two trophies at Wembley Stadium in 2016 – the Football League Trophy, beating Oxford United 3–2 in the final, and the 2016 Football League play-offs, beating Millwall 3–1 in the final. Barnsley became only the second club to secure both the Football League Trophy and Football League promotion via playoff finals in the same season, after Grimsby Town F.C..

On 19 December 2017, it was announced that Patrick Cryne and family had agreed to sell a majority stake in Barnsley Football Club to a consortium involving Chien Lee of NewCity Capital, Grace Hung and Paul Conway of Pacific Media Group, Indian businessman Neerav Parekh and baseball legend Billy Beane. The new consortium holds 80% of the shares and the Cryne family holds 20% of the shares of Barnsley Football club. Barnsley fans often consider their biggest rivals to be Sheffield Wednesday, Sheffield United and Leeds United, although smaller rivalries with Doncaster Rovers, Rotherham United, Huddersfield Town and Bradford City exist.

Daventry United F.C.

Daventry United Football Club was an association football club based in Daventry, England. The club played in the United Counties League Premier Division.

Emlyn Hughes

Emlyn Walter Hughes (28 August 1947 – 9 November 2004) was an English footballer.

Hughes started his career in 1964 at Blackpool before moving to Liverpool in 1967. He would eventually turn out for Liverpool on 665 occasions, and captain the side to four league titles and an FA Cup victory in the 1970s. Added to these domestic honours were two European Cups, including Liverpool's first ever, when the Reds defeated Borussia Moenchengladbach in 1977; and two UEFA Cup titles. Hughes won the Football Writers' Player of the Year in 1977. Hughes would complete a full set of English football domestic honours by winning the League Cup with Wolverhampton Wanderers in 1980. In addition to Wolves, he later played for Rotherham United, Hull City, Mansfield Town and Swansea City. Hughes earned 62 caps for the England national team, which he also captained.After retiring from football he worked as a media personality, mainly with the BBC. He was made an OBE in 1980 for his services to sport. Hughes died of a brain tumour, aged 57, in 2004.

Harry Potts

Harold "Harry" Potts (22 October 1920 – 16 January 1996) was an English football player and manager.

Newport County A.F.C.

Newport County Association Football Club (Welsh: Clwb Pêl-droed Cymdeithas Sir Casnewydd) is a professional football club in Newport, South Wales. The team compete in League Two, the fourth tier of the English football league system. The club's home colours are amber shirts and black shorts. Orange has also been intermittently used as home shirt colour in its history.

Formed in 1912, the club began life in the Southern League before being invited to become founder members of the Football League Third Division in 1920. They failed re-election in 1931, but were elected back into the Football League the next year. They struggled for the next few seasons, but went on to be crowned Third Division South champions in 1938–39. World War II meant they had to wait until the 1946–47 season to take their place in the Second Division, though they were relegated at the end of the campaign. Relegated out of the Third Division in 1962, under the stewardship of Len Ashurst they secured promotion out of the Fourth Division in 1979–80 and also won the Welsh Cup for the first time during the campaign. They reached the quarter-finals of the UEFA Cup Winner's Cup the next year, but went on to suffer from financial difficulties in the 1980s; a double relegation cost them their Football League place by 1988 and the club went out of business in February 1989.

The club reformed but were initially unable to play at their home ground at Somerton Park, so picked up the nickname of the "Exiles". They immediately won the Hellenic League in 1989–90 and were promoted out of the Southern League Midland Division in 1994–95. Now playing at Newport Stadium, they were relegated from the Premier Division in 1997, before winning promotion out of the Midland Division again in 1998–99. Placed in the Conference South in 2004, they went on to be crowned champions in 2009–10 and after moving into Rodney Parade in 2012, they returned to the Football League following a 24-year absence after winning the Conference National play-off final in 2013.

Steve Heighway

Stephen Derek Heighway (born 25 November 1947) is an Irish former footballer who was part of the hugely successful Liverpool team of the 1970s. Regarded as one of the greatest ever Liverpool players, he was ranked 23rd in the 100 Players Who Shook The Kop poll.

Heighway became academy director at Liverpool in a period when the club brought through such players as Steven Gerrard, Ryan Flynn and Jamie Carragher. He retired in 2007 but later rejoined the Liverpool academy in a consultancy role which he currently holds.

Willie Young (footballer, born 1951)

William David Young (born 25 November 1951) is a Scottish former footballer. Young, who played as a defender, featured for the clubs Aberdeen, Tottenham Hotspur, Arsenal, Nottingham Forest, Norwich City, Brighton & Hove Albion and Darlington throughout his career.

Seasons
Qualifying rounds
Finals
FA competitions
Football League
Lower leagues
European competitions
Related to national team
197879 in European football (UEFA)
Domestic leagues
Domestic cups
League cups
UEFA competitions
Non-UEFA competitions

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.