1977 Stanley Cup Finals

The 1977 Stanley Cup Finals was the championship series of the National Hockey League's (NHL) 1976–77 season, and the culmination of the 1977 Stanley Cup playoffs. It was contested between the Boston Bruins and the defending champion Montreal Canadiens. The Bruins were making their first appearance in the final series since their loss in the 1974 Final. The Canadiens would win the best-of-seven series four games to none, to win their second straight Stanley Cup championship, and 20th overall.

1977 Stanley Cup Finals
1234 Total
Montreal Canadiens 10342* 4
Boston Bruins 3021* 0
* indicates periods of overtime
Location(s)Montreal: Montreal Forum (1, 2)
Boston: Boston Garden (3, 4)
CoachesMontreal: Scotty Bowman
Boston: Don Cherry
CaptainsMontreal: Yvan Cournoyer[1]
Boston: John Bucyk
DatesMay 7–14, 1977
MVPGuy Lafleur (Canadiens)
Series-winning goalJacques Lemaire (4:32, first OT, G4)
NetworksCBC, NHL Network

Paths to the Finals

Montreal defeated the St. Louis Blues 4–0 and the New York Islanders 4–2 to advance to the final.

Boston defeated the Los Angeles Kings 4–2 and the Philadelphia Flyers 4–0 to make it to the final.

Game summaries

Jacques Lemaire scored three game-winning goals, including the Cup-winner in overtime. Guy Lafleur won the Conn Smythe Trophy for scoring 10 goals and 17 assists during the playoffs.

Montreal won series 4–0

Montreal Canadiens 1977 Stanley Cup champions

Players

  Centres
  Wingers
  Defencemen
  Goaltenders

Coaching and administrative staff:

Stanley Cup engraving

  • † Serge Savard served as interim captain when Yvan Cournoyer missed the whole playoffs due to a back injury.
  • Bob Gainey was misspelled on the Stanley Cup as ROBERT GAINY, missing an "E". When the Replica Cup was created in 1992–93, ROBERT GAINEY was spelled correctly with 1977 Montreal.
  • #3 Brian Engblom played two playoff games, no regular-season games and no games in the finals. His name was left off the Cup because he did not qualify. Engblom also won the Calder Cup with Mike Polich, and Pierre Mondou in 1977.

See also

References

  1. ^ Due to injury, Cournoyer did not play in any playoff games. Serge Savard served as acting captain.
  • Diamond, Dan, ed. (2000). Total Stanley Cup. NHL.
  • Podnieks, Andrew; Hockey Hall of Fame (2004). Lord Stanley's Cup. Triumph Books. ISBN 978-1-55168-261-7.
Preceded by
Montreal Canadiens
1976
Montreal Canadiens
Stanley Cup champions

1977
Succeeded by
Montreal Canadiens
1978
1976–77 Philadelphia Flyers season

The 1976–77 Philadelphia Flyers season was the Philadelphia Flyers' tenth season in the National Hockey League (NHL). They finished first in the Patrick Division with a record of 48 wins, 16 losses, and 16 ties for 112 points.

1977–78 Philadelphia Flyers season

The 1977–78 Philadelphia Flyers season was the Philadelphia Flyers' 11th season in the National Hockey League (NHL).

1978 Stanley Cup Finals

The 1978 Stanley Cup Finals was the championship series of the National Hockey League's (NHL) 1977–78 season, and the culmination of the 1978 Stanley Cup playoffs. It was contested between the Boston Bruins and the defending champion Montreal Canadiens, making their third straight appearance in the Finals. The series was a rematch of the 1977 Stanley Cup Finals. The Canadiens won the best-of-seven series, four games to two, to win their third consecutive Stanley Cup championship.

Bruins–Canadiens rivalry

The Bruins–Canadiens rivalry is a National Hockey League (NHL) rivalry between the Boston Bruins and Montreal Canadiens. It is considered "one of the greatest rivalries in sports." Retired Bruins forward Bob Sweeney, who played for the Bruins between 1986–87 and 1991–92, once called it among the "top three rivalries in all of sports,... right up there with the... New York Yankees-Boston Red Sox." The two teams have played each other more times, in both regular season play and the Stanley Cup playoffs combined, than any other two teams in NHL history.Through the conclusion of the 2016-17 regular season, the Canadiens have won 360 of these games, scoring a total of 2,333 goals against the Bruins, with the Bruins winning 275 of them, scoring a total of 1,944 goals against the Canadiens, with 103 other games between the two teams ending in ties. In the playoffs, the two teams have met in 34 series for a total of 177 games, 11 series and some 57–60 more games than two other Original Six teams, the Detroit Red Wings and Toronto Maple Leafs. The two teams have faced each other nine times in Game 7 NHL playoff games, more than any other pair of opponents in NHL history.As of the end of the 2017–18 season, the Canadiens are the only team in the Eastern Conference that has a winning overall record against the Bruins. In total, there are only two other teams that have a winning overall record against Boston (the Anaheim Ducks and the Minnesota Wild).

Jacques Lemaire

Jacques Gerard Lemaire (born September 7, 1945) is a retired French Canadian ice hockey forward and head coach who was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1984. He spent his entire twelve-year National Hockey League (NHL) playing career with the Montreal Canadiens (1967–1979) and was a part of eight Stanley Cup Championship teams in 1968, 1969, 1971, 1973, 1976, 1977, 1978 and 1979. In 2017 Lemaire was named one of the '100 Greatest NHL Players' in history.Lemaire was a NHL head coach for seventeen seasons with the Canadiens (1983–1985), New Jersey Devils (1993–1998, 2009–2011) and Minnesota Wild (2000–2009). The pinnacle of his career behind the bench was a Stanley Cup Championship with the Devils in 1994–95.

After retiring at the end of the 2010–11 NHL season, Lemaire accepted a position as special assignment coach for the Devils. He currently works as a special assignment coach for the New York Islanders, a position he previously held with the Toronto Maple Leafs.

May 7 Boston Bruins 3–7 Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
Brad Park (2) - 5:23 First period 1:45 - Doug Risebrough (1)
4:23 - pp - Yvon Lambert (2)
14:35 - Mario Tremblay (2)
Terry O'Reilly (5) - 11:54
Bobby Schmautz (10) - pp - 16:35
Second period 5:08 - Jacques Lemaire (4)
No scoring Third period 00:59 - Rick Chartraw (2)
2:04 - Mario Tremblay (3)
13:58 - Yvon Lambert (3)
Gerry Cheevers Goalie stats Ken Dryden
May 10 Boston Bruins 0–3 Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
No scoring Second period 7:43 - pp - Peter Mahovlich (4)
12:07 - Doug Risebrough (2)
No scoring Third period 5:40 - Steve Shutt (7)
Gerry Cheevers Goalie stats Ken Dryden
May 12 Montreal Canadiens 4–2 Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
Guy Lafleur (8) - pp - 4:08
Steve Shutt (8) - pp - 7:58
Jacques Lemaire (5) - pp - 18:29
First period No scoring
No scoring Second period 6:32 - Gregg Sheppard (5)
Guy Lafleur (9) - 12:52 Third period 18:34 - pp - Peter McNab (5)
Ken Dryden Goalie stats Gerry Cheevers
May 14 Montreal Canadiens 2–1 OT Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
No scoring First period 11:38 - Bobby Schmautz (11)
Jacques Lemaire (6) - 1:34 Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period No scoring
Jacques Lemaire (7) - 4:32 First overtime period No scoring
Ken Dryden Goalie stats Gerry Cheevers

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