1977 National League Championship Series

The 1977 National League Championship Series was a best-of-five matchup between the West Division champion Los Angeles Dodgers and the East Division champion Philadelphia Phillies. The Dodgers beat the Phillies three games to one and went on to lose the 1977 World Series to the New York Yankees.

1977 National League Championship Series
Teams
Team (Wins) Manager Season
Los Angeles Dodgers (3) Tommy Lasorda 98–64, .605, GA: 10
Philadelphia Phillies (1) Danny Ozark 101–61, .623, GA: 5
DatesOctober 4–8
MVPDusty Baker (Los Angeles)
UmpiresPaul Pryor, Bob Engel, Harry Wendelstedt, Bruce Froemming, Dutch Rennert, Paul Runge
Broadcast
TelevisionNBC
KTTV (Dodgers' Broadcast)
WPHL (Phillies' Broadcast)
TV announcersNBC: Joe Garagiola and Tony Kubek (Games 1–2)
Jim Simpson and Maury Wills (Game 3)
Dick Enberg and Don Drysdale (Game 4)
KTTV: Ross Porter and Jerry Doggett
WPHL: Harry Kalas and Richie Ashburn
RadioCBS
Radio announcersRalph Kiner and Jerry Coleman

Summary

Philadelphia Phillies vs. Los Angeles Dodgers

Los Angeles won the series, 3–1.

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance 
1 October 4 Philadelphia Phillies – 7, Los Angeles Dodgers – 5 Dodger Stadium 2:35 55,968[1] 
2 October 5 Philadelphia Phillies – 1, Los Angeles Dodgers – 7 Dodger Stadium 2:14 55,973[2] 
3 October 7 Los Angeles Dodgers – 6, Philadelphia Phillies – 5 Veterans Stadium 2:59 63,719[3] 
4 October 8 Los Angeles Dodgers – 4, Philadelphia Phillies – 1 Veterans Stadium 2:39 64,924[4]

Game summaries

Game 1

Tuesday, October 4, 1977 5:15 pm (PT) at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Philadelphia 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 7 9 0
Los Angeles 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 0 0 5 9 2
WP: Gene Garber (1–0)   LP: Elías Sosa (0–1)   Sv: Tug McGraw (1)
Home runs:
PHI: Greg Luzinski (1)
LAD: Ron Cey (1)

The Phillies took the opening game of the series, winning their first postseason game since Game 1 of the 1915 World Series. They had lost the final four games in 1915, been swept in the 1950 World Series and were swept again in the 1976 National League Championship Series.

Game 1 had been billed as a classic pitching matchup between 1977 Cy Young award winner Steve Carlton and 20-game winner and Comeback Pitcher of the Year Tommy John. It didn't really live up to that, as neither figured in the final decision. The Phillies drew first blood in the first on a two-run homer by Greg Luzinski. They stretched the lead to 4–0 in the fifth on a bases-loaded, two-run single by Davey Johnson. In that inning, the Phils were helped when, on an apparent force-out of Bake McBride by Larry Bowa, Dodger shortstop Bill Russell glided off the second base bag as he received the throw before completing an attempted double play.

The Dodgers finally got on the board in their half of the fifth when Davey Lopes singled in Lee Lacy, who had pinch-hit for John and singled. Lacy scored after being advanced to second on a Carlton balk. The Phillies countered in the sixth on an RBI single by Carlton.

With two outs in the seventh and Lopes on first, Carlton appeared to be on his way out of the inning. However, he issued walks to Bill Russell and Reggie Smith. Ron Cey then made Carlton pay dearly for his loss of control by tying the game at five with a grand slam.

The Phils bounced back in the top of the ninth on an RBI single by Mike Schmidt, his only RBI of the NLCS. They added another run to close out the scoring when Bowa scored on a balk by Dodger reliever Elías Sosa.

Game 2

Wednesday, October 5, 1977 5:15 pm (PT) at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Philadelphia 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 9 1
Los Angeles 0 0 1 4 0 1 1 0 X 7 9 1
WP: Don Sutton (1–0)   LP: Jim Lonborg (0–1)
Home runs:
PHI: Bake McBride (1)
LAD: Dusty Baker (1)

The Phillies got on the board first once again via homer, with Bake McBride hitting a shot off Dodger starter Don Sutton in the third. The Dodgers tied it in the bottom half on an RBI single by Davey Lopes, then broke it wide open on a grand slam by Dusty Baker in the fourth off Jim Lonborg. Meanwhile, Sutton settled in and combined with Charlie Hough to shut the Phils down the rest of the way. The Dodgers added single runs in the sixth and seventh on an RBI single by Steve Yeager and an RBI triple by Reggie Smith.

Game 3

Friday, October 7, 1977 3:15 pm (ET) at Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Los Angeles 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 6 12 2
Philadelphia 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 5 6 2
WP: Lance Rautzhan (1–0)   LP: Gene Garber (1–1)   Sv: Mike Garman (1)

Game 3 went down in Philadelphia baseball annals as "Black Friday."[5] The Dodgers opened the scoring in the second off Larry Christenson when Dusty Baker doubled home Steve Garvey from first on a close play at the plate. The Phillies tried to claim Garvey never touched home plate, but to no avail. Steve Yeager followed with a single to score Baker to make it 2–0.

In the bottom of the second, with two outs and Richie Hebner on second and Bob Boone on first, Dodger starter Burt Hooton began to dispute a number of borderline ball/strike calls issued by home plate umpire Harry Wendelstedt. The normally unflappable Hooton's visible frustration aroused the displeasure of Philadelphia's infamous "boobird" fans, who took out their wrath upon their team's opponent. As the volume of more than 63,000 fans escalated, including derisive chants of "Hoot, Hoot, Hoot" in unison, the rattled Hooton uncharacteristically lost control of both his composure and his pitching. He walked Ted Sizemore to load the bases and then walked pitcher Larry Christenson, Bake McBride, and Larry Bowa in succession to force in three runs and give the Phillies a 3–2 lead. Dodger manager Tommy Lasorda then pulled Hooton in favor of Rick Rhoden, who induced Mike Schmidt into popping up to end the threat.

While Rhoden and Doug Rau were busy shutting down the Phils, the Dodgers tied the game in the fourth on an RBI single by Baker. The score stayed tied at 3–3 until the bottom of the eighth, setting up a wild finish.

Hebner led off the eighth with a double. Garry Maddox singled home Hebner and went all the way to third as Reggie Smith's throw home to try to nail Hebner went wild. Maddox then scored when Bob Boone grounded to Ron Cey at third and Cey threw wildly to first. With a 5–3 lead entering the ninth and ace reliever Gene Garber on the mound, the Phillies seemed in control.

Garber retired the first two hitters and got ahead of pinch-hitter Vic Davalillo 0–1. But Davalillo, noticing Ted Sizemore playing unusually deep at second, shocked the Phillies with a drag bunt for a single.[6] Lasorda then sent another pinch hitter, Manny Mota, to hit for pitcher Lance Rautzhan. Mota, on an 0–2 pitch, sent a deep drive to left that Greg Luzinski reached, but the ball caromed off his glove, onto the wall, and back. Luzinski threw to second to try to nail Mota, but his throw skipped wildly past Sizemore allowing Davalillo to score and Mota to reach third. Phillie manager Danny Ozark came under fire for not having Jerry Martin, a faster outfielder, in left field (a defensive substitution Ozark made often throughout the season) as Martin likely would have reached Mota's liner easier than the bigger, slower Luzinski.

Davey Lopes followed by hitting a blistering grounder to third that took a wicked hop and struck Mike Schmidt in the left knee. Larry Bowa barehanded the ricocheted ball out of the air, and fired to first. On a very close play, umpire Bruce Froemming called Lopes safe. The Phillies protested, but to no avail. Meanwhile, Mota scored to tie the game at 5–5.

Garber, in an attempt to pick off Lopes at first, threw wildly past Hebner, sending Lopes to second. Bill Russell then singled to center to score Lopes with the go-ahead run, before the stunned crowd. Mike Garman retired the side in the ninth for the Dodgers, who narrowly escaped defeat. It was the first time since Game 4 of the 1947 World Series that the Dodgers won a postseason game when trailing going into the ninth inning.

Game 4

Saturday, October 8, 1977 8:15 pm (ET) at Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Los Angeles 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 4 5 0
Philadelphia 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 7 0
WP: Tommy John (1–0)   LP: Steve Carlton (0–1)
Home runs:
LAD: Dusty Baker (2)
PHI: None

The Phillies would not recover after a controversial finish of game 3 as the Dodgers would clinch the pennant in a game that was delayed two hours by rain after the first inning. The Phillies, facing elimination, brought ace pitcher Steve Carlton back on 3 days' rest. In a game played in anything from a drizzle to a steady rain, the Dodgers punched their ticket to the World Series on the strength of a two-run homer in the second by Dusty Baker, who was named NLCS MVP. Tommy John atoned for his Game 1 performance by getting the better of Steve Carlton this time, only allowing a single run in the fourth on an RBI double by Richie Hebner. Two more Dodger runs came across in the fifth when Baker scored on a Carlton wild pitch and Steve Yeager came home on a Bill Russell suicide squeeze bunt that the wet surface made difficult to field. Baker's homer was all John needed, however. Throughout the game, the umpires appeared to consult with National League President Chub Feeney, who was in attendance, about delaying or postponing the game. But the game was completed despite nearly unplayable conditions.

Composite box

1977 NLCS (3–1): Los Angeles Dodgers over Philadelphia Phillies

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Los Angeles Dodgers 0 4 1 5 3 1 5 0 3 22 35 5
Philadelphia Phillies 2 3 1 1 2 1 0 2 2 14 31 3
Total attendance: 240,584   Average attendance: 60,146

References

  1. ^ "1977 NLCS Game 1 – Philadelphia Phillies vs. Los Angeles Dodgers". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  2. ^ "1977 NLCS Game 2 – Philadelphia Phillies vs. Los Angeles Dodgers". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  3. ^ "1977 NLCS Game 3 – Los Angeles Dodgers vs. Philadelphia Phillies". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  4. ^ "1977 NLCS Game 4 – Los Angeles Dodgers vs. Philadelphia Phillies". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  5. ^ Fitzpatrick, Frank (2004). You Can't Lose 'Em All: The Year the Phillies Finally Won the World Series. Retrieved February 8, 2011.
  6. ^ "Dodger Comeback Sinks Phils". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Associated Press. October 8, 1977. p. 12. Retrieved February 8, 2011.

External links

1977 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1977 Los Angeles Dodgers season saw Tommy Lasorda in his first full season at the helm of the Dodgers, replacing longtime manager Walter Alston as Manager of the team near the end of the previous season. The Dodgers won the National League West by 10 games and defeated the Philadelphia Phillies in four games in the NLCS, then lost to the New York Yankees in the World Series. This edition of the Dodgers featured the first quartet of teammates that hit 30 or more home runs: Steve Garvey with 33, Reggie Smith with 32, and Dusty Baker and Ron Cey, who both hit 30. The Dodgers duplicated this feat again 20 years later in 1997.

1977 Major League Baseball season

The 1977 Major League Baseball season. The American League had its third expansion as the Seattle Mariners and Toronto Blue Jays began play. However, the National League did not expand, thus they remained at twelve teams, to the AL's fourteen, until the Colorado Rockies and Florida Marlins joined in 1993.

1977 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1977 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 95th season in the history of the franchise. The Phillies won their second consecutive National League East division title with a record of 101–61, five games over the Pittsburgh Pirates. The Phillies lost the NLCS to the Los Angeles Dodgers, three games to one. The Phillies were managed by Danny Ozark, as they played their home games at Veterans Stadium.

1977 World Series

The 1977 World Series was the 74th edition of Major League Baseball's (MLB) championship series. The best-of-seven playoff was contested between the New York Yankees, champions of the American League (AL) and defending American League champions, and the Los Angeles Dodgers, champions of the National League (NL). The Yankees defeated the Dodgers, four games to two, to win the franchise's 21st World Series championship, their first since 1962, and the first under the ownership of George Steinbrenner. The Series was played between October 11 and 18, broadcast on ABC.

During this Series, Reggie Jackson earned his nickname "Mr. October" for his heroics. Billy Martin won what would be his only World Series title as a manager after guiding the Yankees to a second straight pennant.

Bruce Froemming

Bruce Neal Froemming (; born September 28, 1939) is Major League Baseball Special Assistant to the Vice President on Umpiring, after having served as an umpire in Major League Baseball. He is the longest-tenured umpire in major league history in terms of the number of full seasons umpired, finishing his 37th season in 2007. He first umpired in the National League in 1971, and from 2000 to 2007 worked throughout both major leagues. Early in the 2007 season, Froemming tied Bill Klem for the most seasons umpired (Klem's final season, 1941, included only 11 games as a substitute). Previously, on August 16, 2006, Froemming umpired his 5,000th game between the Detroit Tigers and Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park, making him the second umpire to reach that milestone; Klem retired after 5,374 games. On April 20, 2007, he umpired at first base in the Cleveland Indians-Tampa Bay Devil Rays game, passing Klem to become – at age 67 years 204 days – the man then believed to be the oldest umpire in major league history; Hank O'Day holds the record, retiring at 68 years, 2 months. He worked his final regular-season game at age 68 years 2 days on September 30, 2007, when Froemming received a standing ovation before umpiring his last regular-season game, manning the third base position as the Milwaukee Brewers hosted the San Diego Padres at Miller Park in his native Milwaukee, with much of his family in attendance. Because Froemming is over age 65, he became eligible for election to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2010 instead of having to wait the customary five years.

Johnny Oates

Johnny Lane Oates (January 21, 1946 – December 24, 2004) was an American professional baseball catcher, coach, and manager, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Baltimore Orioles, Atlanta Braves, Philadelphia Phillies, Los Angeles Dodgers, and New York Yankees from 1970 to 1981. During his playing career, He was a light-hitting player who was valued for his defensive skills and played most of his career as a reserve player. It was as a big league manager that Oates experienced his greatest success, when, under his leadership, the Texas Rangers won three American League Western Division titles.

Mike Garman

Michael Douglas "Mike" Garman (born September 16, 1949) is a former professional baseball player, a relief pitcher for five major league teams in the 1970s.

Phillies–Pirates rivalry

The Phillies–Pirates rivalry is a Major League Baseball (MLB) rivalry between the Philadelphia Phillies and Pittsburgh Pirates. Both clubs are members of MLB's National League (NL); the Phillies are members of the NL East division, while the Pirates are members of the NL Central division. The rivalry was considered by some to be one of the best in the NL. The rivalry started when the Pittsburgh Pirates entered NL play in their fifth season of 1887, four years after the Phillies.The Phillies and Pirates had remained together after the NL split into two divisions in 1969. During the period of two-division play (1969–1993), the two NL East division rivals won the two highest numbers of division championships, reigning almost exclusively as NL East champions in the 1970s and again in the early 1990s, the Pirates 9, the Phillies 6; together, the two teams' 15 championships accounted for more than half of the 25 NL East championships during that span.After the Pirates moved to the NL Central in 1994, the teams face each other only in two series each year and the rivalry has diminished. However, many fans, especially older ones, retain their dislike for the other team and regional differences between Eastern and Western Pennsylvania still fuel the rivalry. The rivalry is mirrored in the National Hockey League (NHL)'s so-called "Battle of Pennsylvania".

Richie Hebner

Richard Joseph Hebner (born November 26, 1947) is an American former Major League Baseball (MLB) third baseman and the current batting coach for the Toronto Blue Jays' Triple-A affiliate, the Buffalo Bisons. Hebner was known for working as a gravedigger at a cemetery run by his father and brother, Dennis, during the offseason.

Ron Reed

Ronald Lee Reed (born November 2, 1942) is a former two sport star who spent two seasons as a forward in the National Basketball Association before spending nearly two decades as a Major League Baseball pitcher.

Ted Sizemore

Ted Crawford Sizemore (born April 15, 1945) is a former Major League Baseball second baseman. He was named the National League's Rookie of the Year in 1969.

Tommy Hutton

Thomas George Hutton (born April 20, 1946), is an American former professional baseball infielder-outfielder who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Los Angeles Dodgers, Philadelphia Phillies, Toronto Blue Jays, and Montreal Expos. He is a former color analyst for Florida/Miami Marlins baseball broadcasts on FSN Florida and Sun Sports.

Vic Davalillo

Víctor José Davalillo Romero [da-va-LEE-yo] (born July 31, 1936) is a Venezuelan former professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball as an outfielder for the Cleveland Indians (1963–68), California Angels (1968–69), St. Louis Cardinals (1969–70), Pittsburgh Pirates (1971–73), Oakland Athletics (1973–74) and Los Angeles Dodgers (1977–80). Davalillo batted and threw left-handed.Davalillo was a leadoff hitter known for his speedy baserunning and capable defensive ability. Later in his career, he became a valuable utility player and a record-setting pinch hitter. Davalillo also had an exceptional career in the Venezuelan Winter League where he is the all-time leader in total base hits and in career batting average.

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