1977 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1977 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 48th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 19, 1977, at Yankee Stadium in The Bronx, New York, New York the home of the New York Yankees of the American League. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 7–5.

The host Yankees won the World Series; the third time in history that a team hosting the All-Star Game would win the World Series in the same year. As of 2018, the 1977 Yankees were the last team to accomplish this. The previous teams to accomplish this were the 1939 New York Yankees and the 1959 Los Angeles Dodgers.

This was Yankee Stadium's third time as host of the All-Star Game, and it would be its last until 2008; the last year of the park's use by the Yankees.

1977 Major League Baseball All-Star Game
1977 MLB ASG
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
National League 4 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 7 9 1
American League 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 2 5 8 0
DateJuly 19, 1977
VenueYankee Stadium
CityBronx, New York
Managers
MVPDon Sutton (LA)
Attendance56,683
Ceremonial first pitchRachel Robinson
TelevisionNBC
TV announcersJoe Garagiola and Tony Kubek
RadioCBS
Radio announcersVin Scully and Brent Musburger

Rosters

Players in italics have since been inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

National League

Starters
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Don Sutton Dodgers 4
C Johnny Bench Reds 10
1B Steve Garvey Dodgers 4
2B Joe Morgan Reds 8
3B Ron Cey Dodgers 4
SS Dave Concepción Reds 4
OF George Foster Reds 2
OF Greg Luzinski Phillies 3
OF Dave Parker Pirates 1
Pitchers
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Joaquín Andújar Astros 1
P John Candelaria Pirates 1
P Steve Carlton Phillies 6
P Goose Gossage Pirates 3
P Gary Lavelle Giants 1
P Rick Reuschel Cubs 1
P Tom Seaver Reds 10
P Bruce Sutter Cubs 1
Reserves
Position Player Team All-Star Games
C Ted Simmons Cardinals 4
C John Stearns Mets 1
1B Willie Montañez Braves 1
2B Manny Trillo Cubs 1
3B Pete Rose Reds 11
3B Mike Schmidt Phillies 3
SS Garry Templeton Cardinals 1
OF Ken Griffey, Sr. Reds 2
OF Jerry Morales Cubs 1
OF Reggie Smith Dodgers 5
OF Ellis Valentine Expos 1
OF Dave Winfield Padres 1

American League

Starters
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Jim Palmer Orioles 5
C Carlton Fisk Red Sox 5
1B Rod Carew Twins 11
2B Willie Randolph Yankees 2
3B George Brett Royals 2
SS Rick Burleson Red Sox 1
OF Reggie Jackson Yankees 7
OF Carl Yastrzemski Red Sox 14
OF Richie Zisk White Sox 1
Pitchers
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Vida Blue Athletics 3
P Bill Campbell Red Sox 1
P Dennis Eckersley Indians 1
P Mark Fidrych Tigers 2
P Jim Kern Indians 1
P Dave LaRoche Angels 2
P Sparky Lyle Yankees 3
P Nolan Ryan Angels 4
P Jim Slaton Brewers 1
P Frank Tanana[1] Angels 2
Reserves
Position Player Team All-Star Games
C Thurman Munson Yankees 6
C Butch Wynegar Twins 2
1B Ron Fairly Blue Jays 2
1B George Scott Red Sox 3
1B Jason Thompson Tigers 1
2B Don Money Brewers 3
3B Wayne Gross Athletics 1
3B Graig Nettles Yankees 2
SS Bert Campaneris Rangers 6
OF Larry Hisle Twins 1
OF Ruppert Jones Mariners 1
OF Fred Lynn Red Sox 3
OF Jim Rice Red Sox 1
OF Ken Singleton Orioles 1

Game

Umpires

Home plate Bill Kunkel (AL)
First base Doug Harvey (NL)
Second base Dave Phillips (AL)
Third base Dick Stello (NL)
Left field Joe Brinkman (AL)
Right field Frank Pulli (NL)

Starting lineups

National League American League
Order Player Team Position Order Player Team Position
1 Joe Morgan Reds 2B 1 Rod Carew Twins 1B
2 Steve Garvey Dodgers 1B 2 Willie Randolph Yankees 2B
3 Dave Parker Pirates RF 3 George Brett Royals 3B
4 George Foster Reds CF 4 Carl Yastrzemski Red Sox CF
5 Greg Luzinski Phillies LF 5 Richie Zisk White Sox LF
6 Ron Cey Dodgers 3B 6 Reggie Jackson Yankees RF
7 Johnny Bench Reds C 7 Carlton Fisk Red Sox C
8 Dave Concepción Reds SS 8 Rick Burleson Red Sox SS
9 Don Sutton Dodgers P 9 Jim Palmer Orioles P

Game summary

Tuesday, July 19, 1977 8:30 pm (ET) at Yankee Stadium in Bronx, New York
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
National League 4 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 7 9 1
American League 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 2 5 8 0
WP: Don Sutton (1–0)   LP: Jim Palmer (0–1)
Home runs:
NL: Greg Luzinski (1), Joe Morgan (1), Steve Garvey (1)
AL: George Scott (1)

The National League started with Joe Morgan blasting American League starter Jim Palmer's sixth pitch into Yankee Stadium's "short porch" in right field. Dave Parker followed with a single and scored on a double by George Foster. Greg Luzinski made it 4–0 with a two-run homer. Steve Garvey then sent Palmer to the showers in the third with a homer to make it 5–0 in favor of the NL.

Meanwhile, National League starter Don Sutton cruised along with three shutout innings and Gary Lavelle added two more in the fourth and fifth. The American League first scored off of Tom Seaver in the sixth as Rod Carew led off with a single and went to second when Seaver stopped a lightning-fast shot up the middle hit by Willie Randolph. Seaver recovered to retire Randolph and retired George Brett, but then walked Fred Lynn and surrendered a two-run double to Richie Zisk. Seaver allowed the AL another run in the seventh when Butch Wynegar led off with a single, took second when Graig Nettles reached on an error, and scored on a single by Randolph.

The National League got their final runs in the eighth when Dave Winfield hit a two-run single off Sparky Lyle. George Scott hit a two-run homer in the ninth for the AL off Rich Gossage for the final margin.

Footnotes and references

  1. ^ Player declined or was unable to play.

External links

1977 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1977 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished in second place in the National League West, with a record of 88–74, 10 games behind the Los Angeles Dodgers. The Reds were managed by Sparky Anderson and played their home games at Riverfront Stadium.

1977 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1977 Los Angeles Dodgers season saw Tommy Lasorda in his first full season at the helm of the Dodgers, replacing longtime manager Walter Alston as Manager of the team near the end of the previous season. The Dodgers won the National League West by 10 games and defeated the Philadelphia Phillies in four games in the NLCS, then lost to the New York Yankees in the World Series. This edition of the Dodgers featured the first quartet of teammates that hit 30 or more home runs: Steve Garvey with 33, Reggie Smith with 32, and Dusty Baker and Ron Cey, who both hit 30. The Dodgers duplicated this feat again 20 years later in 1997.

1977 Montreal Expos season

The 1977 Montreal Expos season was the ninth season in the history of the franchise. The team finished fifth in the National League East with a record of 73–87, 26 games behind the Philadelphia Phillies. This was the first year the team played their home games in Olympic Stadium, having left Jarry Park after the 1976 season.

1977 New York Yankees season

The 1977 New York Yankees season was the 75th season for the Yankees in New York and the 77th season overall for the franchise. The team won the World Series, which was the 21st championship in franchise history and the first championship under the ownership of George Steinbrenner. The season was brought to life years later in the book, turned drama-documentary, The Bronx is Burning.

1977 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1977 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 95th season in the history of the franchise. The Phillies won their second consecutive National League East division title with a record of 101–61, five games over the Pittsburgh Pirates. The Phillies lost the NLCS to the Los Angeles Dodgers, three games to one. The Phillies were managed by Danny Ozark, as they played their home games at Veterans Stadium.

1977 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1977 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 96th season of the Pittsburgh Pirates franchise; their 91st in the National League. The Pirates finished second in the National League East with a record of 96–66.

1977 San Diego Padres season

The 1977 San Diego Padres season was the 9th season in franchise history.

1977 Toronto Blue Jays season

The 1977 Toronto Blue Jays season was the first year of Major League Baseball played by the Toronto-based expansion franchise. The Blue Jays finished seventh in the American League East with a record of 54 wins and 107 losses, 45½ games behind the World Champion New York Yankees.

1978 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1978 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 49th midseason exhibition between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was played on July 11, 1978, at San Diego Stadium in San Diego, home of the San Diego Padres of the National League. The game resulted in a 7-3 victory for the NL.

This was the first All-Star Game to be played in San Diego. It would return in 1992 to be played in the same stadium, though it was renamed Jack Murphy Stadium by that time.

The honorary captains were Brooks Robinson (for the AL) and Eddie Mathews (for the NL).

Bill Robinson (outfielder)

William Henry Robinson, Jr. (June 26, 1943 – July 29, 2007) was an American professional baseball outfielder, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1966 to 1983, for several teams. He also played some first and third base. Robinson batted and threw right-handed.

After his playing days ended, Robinson moved on to a very successful coaching career. He is cited as having been a key mentor in Darryl Strawberry's career, as well as several other young players he coached with the New York Mets.

Overall, Robinson collected three World Series rings, with the 1979 Pittsburgh Pirates (as a player), and as first base coach for both the 1986 Mets and 2003 Florida Marlins.

Ellis Valentine

Ellis Clarence Valentine (born July 30, 1954) is a former Major League Baseball right fielder. He is remembered for having one of the all-time great throwing arms. "There's a plateau where you can't throw the ball any harder and you can't be any more accurate", said former Montreal manager Felipe Alou. "That was Ellis Valentine."

George Foster (baseball)

George Arthur Foster (born December 1, 1948) is an American former professional baseball outfielder, who played in Major League Baseball from 1969 to 1986. One of the most feared right-handed sluggers of his era, he was a key piece of the Cincinnati Reds' "Big Red Machine" that won consecutive World Series in 1975 and 1976.

Foster led the National League in home runs in 1977 and 1978, and in RBIs in 1976, 1977, and 1978. He won the NL's Most Valuable Player Award in 1977 and a Silver Slugger Award in 1981.

Jason Thompson (first baseman, born 1954)

Jason Dolph Thompson (born July 6, 1954) is a former Major League Baseball first baseman, and the current owner and operator of Jason Thompson Baseball, which offers baseball instruction in Auburn Hills, Michigan. He threw and batted left-handed.

Jerry Morales

Julio Ruben "Jerry" Morales Torres (born February 18, 1949) is a former Major League Baseball outfielder who played from 1969-1983.

Jim Kern

James Lester Kern (born March 15, 1949 in Gladwin, Michigan) is a retired Major League Baseball pitcher. A three time American League All-Star (1977–1979), Kern went 13-5 with a 1.57 ERA and 29 saves out of the Texas Rangers' bullpen in 1979 to finish fourth in American League Cy Young Award balloting.

Richie Zisk

Richard Walter Zisk (born February 6, 1949) is an American former professional baseball outfielder and designated hitter. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Chicago White Sox, Texas Rangers and Seattle Mariners.

Rick Burleson

Richard Paul "Rooster" Burleson (born April 29, 1951) is a former Major League Baseball shortstop. "Rooster," as Burleson was nicknamed, was a famously intense ballplayer. Former Boston Red Sox teammate Bill Lee once said of Burleson, "Some guys didn't like to lose, but Rick got angry if the score was even tied."

Ron Fairly

Ronald Ray Fairly (born July 12, 1938) is a former Major League Baseball player and broadcaster. When combining playing and broadcasting, Fairly was involved in over 7,000 major league games from 1958 through to 2006.

Ruppert Jones

Ruppert Sanderson Jones (born March 12, 1955) is a former Major League Baseball center fielder. He was the first player selected in the 1976 Major League Baseball expansion draft by the Seattle Mariners.

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