1975 World Series

The 1975 World Series of Major League Baseball was played between the Boston Red Sox (AL) and Cincinnati Reds (NL). In 2003, it was ranked by ESPN as the second-greatest World Series ever played.[1] Cincinnati won the series in seven games.

The Cincinnati Reds recorded a franchise-high 108 victories and won the National League West division by 20 games over the Los Angeles Dodgers then defeated the Pittsburgh Pirates, three games to none, in the National League Championship Series. The Boston Red Sox won the American League East division by 4½ games over the Baltimore Orioles then defeated the three-time defending World Series champion Oakland A's, three games to none, in the American League Championship Series.

Boston star left fielder Jim Rice missed both the ALCS and the World Series due to a broken hand.

The Reds won the seventh and deciding game of the series on a ninth-inning RBI single by Joe Morgan. The sixth game of the Series was a 12-inning classic at Boston's Fenway Park culminated by a game-winning home run by Carlton Fisk to extend the series to seven games.

It was the third World Series appearance by the Reds in six years, losing in 1970 to Baltimore and in 1972 to Oakland.

Oddly, this was the fourth consecutive time that a seven-game series winner (Pittsburgh 1971, Oakland 1972, Oakland 1973, Cincinnati 1975) scored fewer runs than the losing team.

1975 World Series
1975-World-Series
Team (Wins) Manager(s) Season
Cincinnati Reds (4) Sparky Anderson 108–54, .667, GA: 20
Boston Red Sox (3) Darrell Johnson 95–65, .594, GA: ​4 12
DatesOctober 11–22
MVPPete Rose (Cincinnati)
UmpiresArt Frantz (AL), Dick Stello (NL), George Maloney (AL), Satch Davidson (NL), Larry Barnett (AL), Nick Colosi (NL)
Hall of FamersReds: Sparky Anderson (mgr.), Johnny Bench, Joe Morgan, Tony Pérez
Red Sox: Carlton Fisk, Jim Rice (injured), Carl Yastrzemski.
ALCSBoston Red Sox over Oakland A's (3–0)
NLCSCincinnati Reds over Pittsburgh Pirates (3–0)
Broadcast
TelevisionNBC
TV announcersCurt Gowdy (Games 1, 3, 5, 7), Joe Garagiola (Games 2, 4, 6), Dick Stockton (Games 1, 6), Ned Martin (Games 2, 7), Marty Brennaman (Games 3–5) and Tony Kubek
RadioNBC
Radio announcersJoe Garagiola (Games 1, 3, 5, 7), Curt Gowdy (Games 2, 4, 6), Marty Brennaman (Games 1–2, 6–7), Ned Martin (Games 3, 5–6) and Dick Stockton (Games 4, 7)
World Series

Summary

NL Cincinnati Reds (4) vs. AL Boston Red Sox (3)

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance 
1 October 11 Cincinnati Reds – 0, Boston Red Sox – 6 Fenway Park 2:27 35,205[2] 
2 October 12 Cincinnati Reds – 3, Boston Red Sox – 2 Fenway Park 2:38 35,205[3] 
3 October 14 Boston Red Sox – 5, Cincinnati Reds – 6 (10 innings) Riverfront Stadium 3:03 55,392[4] 
4 October 15 Boston Red Sox – 5, Cincinnati Reds – 4 Riverfront Stadium 2:52 55,667[5] 
5 October 16 Boston Red Sox – 2, Cincinnati Reds – 6 Riverfront Stadium 2:23 56,393[6] 
6 October 21 Cincinnati Reds – 6, Boston Red Sox – 7 (12 innings) Fenway Park 4:01 35,205[7] 
7 October 22 Cincinnati Reds – 4, Boston Red Sox – 3 Fenway Park 2:52 35,205[8]

: postponed from October 18 due to rain

Matchups

Game 1

Saturday, October 11, 1975 1:00 pm (ET) at Fenway Park in Boston, Massachusetts
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Cincinnati 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0
Boston 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 X 6 12 0
WP: Luis Tiant (1–0)   LP: Don Gullett (0–1)

Aces Luis Tiant and Don Gullett were locked in a scoreless pitching duel until the seventh inning. Tiant led off with a single and later scored Boston's first run on a single by Carl Yastrzemski. Then the floodgates opened: Reds reliever Clay Carroll walked Carlton Fisk to force in a run, Rico Petrocelli slapped a two-run single, Rick Burleson had an RBI single, and Cecil Cooper ended the scoring with a sacrifice fly. Tiant finished with a five-hitter against a team that had scored an MLB high 840 runs during the regular season.

Game 2

Sunday, October 12, 1975 1:00 pm (ET) at Fenway Park in Boston, Massachusetts
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Cincinnati 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 3 7 1
Boston 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 7 0
WP: Rawly Eastwick (1–0)   LP: Dick Drago (0–1)

Game 2 proved to be a very pivotal game as the Reds were on the brink of being down 0-2 before rallying for victory in the ninth inning. Red Sox starter Bill Lee held the Reds to four hits and a run through eight innings. Johnny Bench led off the ninth with a double to right field. Lee was then replaced by right-handed closer Dick Drago. Bench moved to third on a groundout by Tony Pérez. After George Foster popped out for the second out, Dave Concepción hit a clutch single up the middle that Boston second baseman Denny Doyle fielded behind second base, but had no play at first as Bench scored to tie the game. After Concepcion stole second base, Ken Griffey hit a double into left-center field scoring Concepcion with the game-winner. Rawly Eastwick retired the Sox in the ninth to get the win and even the series.

The Reds' only other run scored in the fourth when Joe Morgan walked, went to third on a Bench single, and scored on a Pérez force out.

The Red Sox sandwiched the Reds' run with single tallies of their own in the first inning on an RBI single by Carlton Fisk, and in the seventh on an RBI single by Rico Petrocelli.

Game 3

Tuesday, October 14, 1975 8:30 pm (ET) at Riverfront Stadium in Cincinnati, Ohio
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 R H E
Boston 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 5 10 2
Cincinnati 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 0 1 6 7 0
WP: Rawly Eastwick (2–0)   LP: Jim Willoughby (0–1)
Home runs:
BOS: Carlton Fisk (1), Bernie Carbo (1), Dwight Evans (1)
CIN: Johnny Bench (1), Dave Concepción (1), César Gerónimo (1)

At home, the Reds prevailed in another squeaker in a game that featured the first major controversy of the series involving the umpires. The Reds had opened up a 5-1 lead through five innings before Boston rallied, capped by a two-run homer by Dwight Evans in the top of the ninth to tie the game at 5. The game stayed tied until the bottom of the 10th inning. Cesar Geronimo led off the bottom of the 10th with a single off Jim Willoughby. Reds manager Sparky Anderson then sent pinch-hitter Ed Armbrister up to sacrifice in place of reliever Rawly Eastwick. Armbrister's bunt bounced high near the plate toward the first-base line. Boston catcher Carlton Fisk was quick to pounce on the ball in front of the plate as Armbrister was slow to get out of the box. He hesitated before running and appeared to collide (or at least impede) Fisk as he was retrieving the ball. Fisk's hurried throw to second base to force out Geronimo sailed over shortstop Rick Burleson into center field as Geronimo went to third base and Armbrister to second. Fisk and Boston manager Darrell Johnson argued that Armbrister should have been ruled out for interference, but home plate umpire Larry Barnett ruled otherwise. The play stood and the Reds had the potential winning run on third with no outs. Willoughby then intentionally walked Pete Rose to load the bases and set up a force play at any base. Johnson then brought in left-hander Roger Moret, to face Ken Griffey, but Anderson countered with right-handed hitting Merv Rettenmund. Rettenmund struck out for out No. 1, but Joe Morgan knocked in Geronimo with the game-winner by hitting a deep fly to center over a drawn in outfield.

For nine innings, the game was a homer-fest as each team put three over the wall. Fisk put the Sox on the board in the second with a homer off Reds starter Gary Nolan. The Reds countered by taking a 2–1 lead in the fourth when Tony Pérez walked and Johnny Bench hit a two-run shot off Sox starter Rick Wise. The Reds then chased Wise in the fifth when Dave Concepción and César Gerónimo hit back-to-back shots. Pete Rose followed with a one-out triple and scored on Joe Morgan's sacrifice fly to give the Reds a 5–1 lead. The Sox scratched back in the sixth when Reds reliever Pat Darcy issued consecutive walks to Carl Yastrzemski and Fisk, wild-pitched Yastrzemski to third, and then gave up a sacrifice fly to Fred Lynn. In the seventh, Bernie Carbo closed the gap to 5–3 with a pinch-hit homer off Clay Carroll.

In the top of the ninth, with Reds closer Eastwick on the mound, Rico Petrocelli singled and Evans hit the game-tying home run, sending the game into extra innings.

Game 4

Wednesday, October 15, 1975 8:30 pm (ET) at Riverfront Stadium in Cincinnati, Ohio
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Boston 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 5 11 1
Cincinnati 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 4 9 1
WP: Luis Tiant (2–0)   LP: Fred Norman (0–1)

With the Reds leading the series 2–1, Luis Tiant would pitch his second complete game win of the Series. More importantly, this win would force the Reds to have to win at least one of two games at Fenway Park to win the Series.

The Reds struck first off Tiant in the first on RBI doubles by Ken Griffey and Johnny Bench. The Sox, however, would get all the runs they needed in the fourth. Dwight Evans tied the game with a two-run triple, then Rick Burleson put the Sox ahead by doubling in Evans off Reds starter Fred Norman. Tiant, continuing his surprising hitting, singled Burleson to third. Burleson then scored on a Tony Pérez error on a ball hit by Juan Beníquez, while Tiant went to second. Carl Yastrzemski drove in Tiant with a single for what would turn out to be the winning run.

The Reds were able to counter with two runs in their half of the fourth on an RBI double by Dave Concepción and an RBI triple by César Gerónimo. The Reds had a shot at winning the game in the bottom of the ninth when, with two on and one out, Ken Griffey sent a deep drive into left-center that Fred Lynn made an over the shoulder catch. Joe Morgan then popped out to first on Tiant's 163rd pitch of the game.

Game 5

Thursday, October 16, 1975 8:30 pm (ET) at Riverfront Stadium in Cincinnati, Ohio
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Boston 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 5 0
Cincinnati 0 0 0 1 1 3 0 1 X 6 8 0
WP: Don Gullett (1–1)   LP: Reggie Cleveland (0–1)   Sv: Rawly Eastwick (1)
Home runs:
BOS: None
CIN: Tony Pérez 2 (2)

Reds' lefty Don Gullett pitched like an ace as the Reds won their final home game in Game 5 to put Cincinnati on the brink of their first World Series championship in 35 years. Cincinnati first baseman and cleanup hitter Tony Pérez broke out of an 0-for-15 World Series slump with a pair of home runs while driving in four runs off Boston starter Reggie Cleveland. Pete Rose contributed an RBI double and Dave Concepción hit a sacrifice fly for the other Reds runs, while Gullett pitched ​8 23 innings, limiting the powerful Boston lineup to five hits. Reds closer Rawly Eastwick came on to strike out Boston third baseman Rico Petrocelli for the game's final out.

Game 6

Tuesday, October 21, 1975 8:15 pm (ET) at Fenway Park in Boston, Massachusetts
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 R H E
Cincinnati 0 0 0 0 3 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 6 14 0
Boston 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 7 10 1
WP: Rick Wise (1–0)   LP: Pat Darcy (0–1)
Home runs:
CIN: César Gerónimo (2)
BOS: Fred Lynn (1), Bernie Carbo (2), Carlton Fisk (2)

This game would go down as one of the greatest in postseason history. Thanks to three days of rain in Boston, Red Sox manager Darrell Johnson was afforded the luxury of having his top two starting pitchers, Luis Tiant and Bill Lee, available for Games 6 and 7, respectively, while the Reds were able to have their ace, Don Gullett, available for a potential Game 7 after pitching a gem in Game 5.

Boston's Fred Lynn opened the scoring in the first with a two-out, three-run homer off Reds starter Gary Nolan. Meanwhile, Tiant breezed through the first four innings, holding the Reds scoreless. The Reds finally broke through in the fifth. With two on, Ken Griffey tripled to deep center scoring both runs on a ball that Lynn just missed making spectacular leaping catch against the wall. Lynn would suffer a rib injury, but remained in the game. Lynn told moderator Bob Costas during MLB Network's "Top 20 games in the last 50 years" that, for a short time, he was barely conscious and couldn't feel his legs.[9] Johnny Bench singled Griffey home to tie the game at 3–3.

In the seventh, George Foster put the Reds ahead with a two-run double and, in the top of the eighth, César Gerónimo hit a homer to chase Tiant and give the Reds a 6–3 lead.

In the bottom of the eighth, Reds reliever Pedro Borbón gave up a single to Fred Lynn, and then walked Rico Petrocelli. Rawly Eastwick replaced Borbon and struck out Dwight Evans and retired Rick Burleson on a line-out to left. Bernie Carbo was called on to bat for Roger Moret. Sparky Anderson was on the top step of the dugout, ready to call in left-hander Will McEnaney to pitch to the left-hand hitting Carbo. Anderson said later that he was concerned that the Sox would call on Juan Beníquez to pinch hit for Carbo if he made the move. Carbo looked overmatched by Eastwick early in the count, but worked it to a 2-2 count. On the next pitch, Carbo tied the game with a three-run home run to center field.

As Carbo approached third base on his home run trot, Carbo yelled out to former teammate Pete Rose, "Hey, Pete, don't you wish you were that strong?" To which Rose replied, "This is fun."

The Sox looked poised to win the game in the bottom of the ninth. With McEnaney, the Reds' seventh pitcher, on the mound, the Sox loaded the bases with no outs. Denny Doyle walked and went to third on a Carl Yastrzemski single. McEnaney then intentionally walked Carlton Fisk to load the bases to face the left-handed hitting Lynn. Lynn flied out to Foster in foul territory in left, and Foster gunned down Doyle, who tagged up and attempted to score. McEnaney then retired Petrocelli, ending the jam. In the top of the 11th, with Ken Griffey on first, Joe Morgan hit a deep drive to right off Dick Drago that looked to be headed over the fence. Evans, however, made a running catch near the visitors bullpen in deep right to rob Morgan and double Griffey off first.

In the bottom of the 12th, Fisk faced Pat Darcy, the eighth pitcher that Reds manager Sparky Anderson used. Fisk took Darcy's second pitch and lifted a high drive down the left-field line. The ball struck the foul pole well above the Green Monster. In what has now become an iconic baseball film highlight, the NBC left-field game camera[10] caught Fisk wildly waving his arms to his right after hitting the ball and watching its path while drifting down the first base line, as if he was trying to coax the ball to "stay fair". The ball indeed stayed fair and the Red Sox had tied the Series.

Game 7

Wednesday, October 22, 1975 8:15 pm (ET) at Fenway Park in Boston, Massachusetts
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Cincinnati 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 4 9 0
Boston 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 5 2
WP: Clay Carroll (1–0)   LP: Jim Burton (0–1)   Sv: Will McEnaney (1)
Home runs:
CIN: Tony Pérez (3)
BOS: None

Despite the exciting Game 6, there were no worries about Game 7 being anti-climactic. The game was scoreless until the third inning when Reds starter Don Gullett experienced control problems. After giving up an RBI single to Carl Yastrzemski, Gullett walked Carlton Fisk to load the bases. He then walked Rico Petrocelli and Dwight Evans to force in two more runs before striking out Rick Burleson for the final out. Gullett pitched a scoreless fourth before being relieved by Jack Billingham. The Reds bullpen pitched five scoreless innings and gave the Cincinnati offense a chance to rally.

Boston starter Bill Lee was again sharp, as he shut out the Reds through five innings. In the sixth, with Pete Rose on first base and one out, Johnny Bench hit what appeared to be an inning-ending double play grounder to shortstop Burleson who flipped the ball to Denny Doyle covering second base. But Rose slid high and hard into Doyle at second and forced an errant throw that sailed into the Boston dugout as Bench moved to second base. On a 1-0 count, Lee threw a blooper pitch to Tony Pérez who slammed the ball over the Green Monster and onto Lansdowne Street for a two-run home run, his third HR in the final three Series games, to draw the Reds to within 2-3.

The Reds tied it in the seventh when Ken Griffey walked, stole second, and scored on a two-out single by Rose.

In the ninth, Griffey led off with a walk, was sacrificed to second by César Gerónimo, and went to third on a groundout. Boston reliever Jim Burton then walked Rose to set up a forceout, but Joe Morgan reached down and blooped a low breaking ball into center field to score Griffey with the go-ahead run. In the ninth, Will McEnaney retired the Sox in order, with Yastrzemski flying out to center field to end the game.

Composite line score

1975 World Series (4–3): Cincinnati Reds (N.L.) over Boston Red Sox (A.L.)

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 R H E
Cincinnati Reds 2 0 0 6 7 5 3 2 3 1 0 0 29 59 2
Boston Red Sox 5 1 3 5 0 2 7 3 3 0 0 1 30 60 6
Total attendance: 308,272   Average attendance: 44,039
Winning player's share: $19,060   Losing player's share: $13,326[11]

Statistics summary

Series batting stats

Cincinnati Reds

                                          SERIES STATS                   |      REGULAR SEASON
 Player              G  AB  R  H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO  BA    OBP   SLG  SB |  AB   H   HR   BA    OPS  SB
+-------------------+-+---+--+--+--+--+--+---+--+--+-----+-----+-----+---+----+----+---+-----+-----+---+
 Ed Armbrister       4   1  1  0  0  0  0   0  2  0  .000  .667  .000  0 |  65   12   0  .185  .454   3
 Johnny Bench        7  29  5  6  2  0  1   4  2  4  .207  .258  .379  0 | 530  150  28  .283  .878  11
 Jack Billingham     3   2  0  0  0  0  0   0  0  0  .000  .000  .000  0 |  65    7   0  .108  .313   0
 Pedro Borbón        3   1  0  0  0  0  0   0  0  0  .000  .000  .000  0 |  24    7   0  .292  .625   0
 Clay Carroll        5   0  0  0  0  0  0   0  0  0                    0 |  19    0   0  .000  .000   0
#Darrel Chaney       2   2  0  0  0  0  0   0  0  1  .000  .000  .000  0 | 160   35   2  .219  .574   3
 Dave Concepción     7  28  3  5  1  0  1   4  0  1  .179  .200  .321  3 | 507  139   5  .274  .679  33
*Terry Crowley       2   2  0  1  0  0  0   0  0  1  .500  .500  .500  0 |  71   19   1  .268  .728   0
*Pat Darcy           2   1  0  0  0  0  0   0  0  1  .000  .000  .000  0 |  47    4   0  .085  .191   0
*Dan Driessen        2   2  0  0  0  0  0   0  0  0  .000  .000  .000  0 | 210   59   7  .281  .814  10
 Rawly Eastwick      5   1  0  0  0  0  0   0  0  0  .000  .000  .000  0 |  15    1   0  .067  .133   0
 George Foster       7  29  1  8  1  0  0   2  1  1  .276  .300  .310  1 | 463  139  23  .300  .875   2
*César Gerónimo      7  25  3  7  0  1  2   3  3  5  .280  .357  .600  0 | 501  129   6  .257  .690  13
*Ken Griffey         7  26  4  7  3  1  0   4  4  2  .269  .367  .462  2 | 463  141   4  .305  .793  16
 Don Gullett         3   7  1  2  0  0  0   0  0  2  .286  .286  .286  0 |  62   14   0  .226  .520   0
*Will McEnaney       5   1  0  1  0  0  0   0  0  0 1.000 1.000 1.000  0 |  14    0   0  .000  .000   0
*Joe Morgan          7  27  4  7  1  0  0   3  5  1  .259  .364  .296  2 | 498  163  17  .327  .974  67
 Gary Nolan          2   1  0  0  0  0  0   0  0  0  .000  .000  .000  0 |  68   12   0  .176  .474   0
#Fred Norman         2   1  0  0  0  0  0   0  0  0  .000  .000  .000  0 |  60    7   0  .117  .292   0
 Tony Pérez          7  28  4  5  0  0  3   7  3  9  .179  .258  .500  1 | 511  144  20  .282  .816   1
 Merv Rettenmund     3   3  0  0  0  0  0   0  0  1  .000  .000  .000  0 | 188   45   2  .239  .669   5
#Pete Rose           7  27  3 10  1  1  0   2  5  1  .370  .485  .481  0 | 662  210   7  .317  .838   0
+-------------------+-+---+--+--+--+--+--+---+--+--+-----+-----+-----+---+----+----+---+-----+-----+---+
 Total               7 244 29 59  9  3  7  29 25 30  .242  .315  .389  9 |5203 1430 124  .275  .753 168
   * – bats left-handed, # – switch hits, ? – unknown, else – bats right-handed
   A + before season totals indicates the player was with multiple teams this year.

Boston Red Sox

                                          SERIES STATS                   |      REGULAR SEASON
 Player              G  AB  R  H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO  BA    OBP   SLG  SB |  AB   H   HR   BA    OPS  SB
+-------------------+-+---+--+--+--+--+--+---+--+--+-----+-----+-----+---+----+----+---+-----+-----+---+
 Juan Beníquez       3   8  0  1  0  0  0   1  1  1  .125  .222  .125  0 | 254   74   2  .291  .760   7
 Rick Burleson       7  24  1  7  1  0  0   2  4  2  .292  .393  .333  0 | 580  146   6  .252  .634   8
 Jim Burton          2   0  0  0  0  0  0   0  0  0                    0 |   0    0   0               0
*Bernie Carbo        4   7  3  3  1  0  2   4  1  1  .429  .500  1.42  0 | 319   82  15  .257  .892   2
 Reggie Cleveland    3   2  0  0  0  0  0   0  0  2  .000  .000  .000  0 |   0    0   0               0
*Cecil Cooper        5  19  0  1  1  0  0   1  0  3  .053  .050  .105  0 | 305   95  14  .311  .899   1
*Denny Doyle         7  30  3  8  1  1  0   0  2  1  .267  .312  .367  0 |+325   97   4  .298  .742   5
 Dick Drago          2   0  0  0  0  0  0   0  0  0                    0 |   0    0   0               0
 Dwight Evans        7  24  3  7  1  1  1   5  3  4  .292  .393  .542  0 | 412  113  13  .274  .809   3
 Carlton Fisk        7  25  5  6  0  0  2   4  7  7  .240  .406  .480  0 | 263   87  10  .331  .923   4
 Doug Griffin        1   1  0  0  0  0  0   0  0  0  .000  .000  .000  0 | 287   69   1  .240  .560   2
*Bill Lee            2   6  0  1  0  0  0   0  0  3  .167  .167  .167  0 |   0    0   0               0
*Fred Lynn           7  25  3  7  1  0  1   5  3  5  .280  .345  .440  0 | 528  175  21  .331  .967  10
*Rick Miller         3   2  0  0  0  0  0   0  0  0  .000  .000  .000  0 | 108   21   0  .194  .557   3
 Bob Montgomery      1   1  0  0  0  0  0   0  0  0  .000  .000  .000  0 | 195   44   2  .226  .559   1
#Roger Moret         3   0  0  0  0  0  0   0  0  0                    0 |   0    0   0               0
 Rico Petrocelli     7  26  3  8  1  0  0   4  3  6  .308  .379  .346  0 | 402   96   7  .239  .644   0
 Dick Pole           1   0  0  0  0  0  0   0  0  0                    0 |   0    0   0               0
 Diego Seguí         1   0  0  0  0  0  0   0  0  0                    0 |   0    0   0               0
 Luis Tiant          3   8  2  2  0  0  0   0  2  4  .250  .400  .250  0 |   1    0   0  .000  .000   0
 Jim Willoughby      3   0  0  0  0  0  0   0  0  0                    0 |   0    0   0               0
 Rick Wise           2   2  0  0  0  0  0   0  0  0  .000  .000  .000  0 |   0    0   0               0
*Carl Yastrzemski    7  29  7  9  0  0  0   4  4  1  .310  .382  .310  0 | 543  146  14  .269  .776   8
+-------------------+-+---+--+--+--+--+--+---+--+--+-----+-----+-----+---+----+----+---+-----+-----+---+
 Total               7 239 30 60  7  2  6  30 30 40  .251  .333  .372  0 |4522 1245 134  .275  .761  66
   * – bats left-handed, # – switch hits, ? – unknown, else – bats right-handed
   A + before season totals indicates the player was with multiple teams this year.

Series pitching stats

Cincinnati Reds

                        SERIES STATS                    |     REGULAR SEASON
 Player              G  ERA  W-L SV CG  IP   H ER BB SO |  W-L   IP   ERA   WHIP  SO SV
+-------------------+-+-----+---+--+--+----+--+--+--+---+------+----+-----+-----+---+--+
*Don Gullett         3  4.34 1–1  0  0 18.2 19  9 10 15 | 15–4   160  2.42  1.15  98
 Jack Billingham     3  1.00 0–0  0  0  9.0  8  1  5  7 | 15–10  208  4.11  1.43  79
 Rawly Eastwick      5  2.25 2–0  1  0  8.0  6  2  3  4 |  5–3    90  2.60  1.13  61 22
*Will McEnaney       5  2.70 0–0  1  0  6.2  3  2  2  5 |  5–2    91  2.47  1.26  48 15
 Gary Nolan          2  6.00 0–0  0  0  6.0  6  4  1  2 | 15–9   211  3.16  1.10  74
 Clay Carroll        5  3.18 1–0  0  0  5.2  4  2  2  3 |  7–5    96  2.62  1.30  44  7
 Pat Darcy           2  4.50 0–1  0  0  4.0  3  2  2  1 | 11–5   131  3.58  1.48  46  1
*Fred Norman         2  9.00 0–1  0  0  4.0  8  4  3  2 | 12–4   188  3.73  1.31 119
 Pedro Borbón        3  6.00 0–0  0  0  3.0  3  2  2  1 |  9–5   125  2.95  1.33  29  5
+-------------------+-+-----+---+--+--+----+--+--+--+---+------+----+-----+-----+---+--+
 Total                  3.88 4–3  2  0 65.0 60 28 30 40 | 94–47 1300  3.37 1.310 598 50
   * – throws left-handed, ? – unknown, else – throws right-handed
   A + before season totals indicates the player was with multiple teams this year.

Boston Red Sox

                        SERIES STATS                    |     REGULAR SEASON
 Player              G  ERA  W-L SV CG  IP   H ER BB SO |  W-L   IP  ERA   WHIP  SO SV
+-------------------+-+-----+---+--+--+----+--+--+--+---+------+----+-----+-----+---+--+
 Luis Tiant          3  3.60 2–0  0  2 25.0 25 10  8 12 | 18–14  260  4.02  1.28 142
*Bill Lee            2  3.14 0–0  0  0 14.1 12  5  3  7 | 17–9   260  3.95  1.32  78
 Reggie Cleveland    3  6.75 0–1  0  0  6.2  7  5  3  5 | 13–9   171  4.43  1.32  78
 Jim Willoughby      3  0.00 0–1  0  0  6.1  3  0  0  2 |  5–2    48  3.54  1.28  29  8
 Rick Wise           2  8.44 1–0  0  0  5.1  6  5  2  2 | 19–12  255  3.95  1.31 141
 Dick Drago          2  2.25 0–1  0  0  4.0  3  1  1  1 |  2–2    73  3.84  1.38  43 15
*Roger Moret         3  0.00 0–0  0  0  1.2  2  0  3  1 | 14–3   145  3.60  1.43  80  1
 Diego Seguí         1  0.00 0–0  0  0  1.0  0  0  0  0 |  2–5    71  4.82  1.61  45  6
*Jim Burton          2  9.00 0–1  0  0  1.0  1  1  3  0 |  1–2    53  2.89  1.45  39  1
 Dick Pole           1   inf 0–0  0  0  0.0  0  1  2  0 |  4–6    90  4.42  1.49  42
+-------------------+-+-----+---+--+--+----+--+--+--+---+------+----+-----+-----+---+--+
 Total                  3.86 3–4  0  2 65.1 59 28 25 30 | 95–64 1426  3.98 1.360 717 31
   * – throws left-handed, ? – unknown, else – throws right-handed
   A + before season totals indicates the player was with multiple teams this year.

Broadcasting

NBC broadcast the Series on television and radio, with Curt Gowdy and Joe Garagiola alternating play-by-play on both media along with team announcers Dick Stockton and Ned Martin (Red Sox) and Marty Brennaman (Reds). Tony Kubek provided color commentary on the telecasts.

This was the final World Series play-by-play assignment for Gowdy, who had been NBC's lead baseball announcer since 1966. Garagiola would take over full-time as the network's main play-by-play voice for baseball the following season.

This was also the final Series broadcast for NBC Radio, which had retained exclusive rights to the event since 1957. CBS Radio would become the exclusive national radio network for MLB beginning the following season.

This was the only World Series broadcast for Stockton, who would become a prominent national sportscaster for such networks as CBS, Fox, and TNT.

This is the earliest World Series broadcast whose games survive today in their entirety. Portions of many previous Series broadcasts also survive, but the general practice of the networks in the past was to wipe old broadcasts to save money and space. All subsequent World Series broadcasts since this one also have had all their games preserved.

Notes

  1. ^ ESPN: WORLD SERIES 100th ANNIVERSARY
  2. ^ "1975 World Series Game 1 – Cincinnati Reds vs. Boston Red Sox". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  3. ^ "1975 World Series Game 2 – Cincinnati Reds vs. Boston Red Sox". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  4. ^ "1975 World Series Game 3 – Boston Red Sox vs. Cincinnati Reds". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  5. ^ "1975 World Series Game 4 – Boston Red Sox vs. Cincinnati Reds". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  6. ^ "1975 World Series Game 5 – Boston Red Sox vs. Cincinnati Reds". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  7. ^ "1975 World Series Game 6 – Cincinnati Reds vs. Boston Red Sox". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  8. ^ "1975 World Series Game 7 – Cincinnati Reds vs. Boston Red Sox". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  9. ^ "MLB's 20 Greatest Games". MLB. Retrieved December 27, 2012.
  10. ^ Verducci, Tom (October 21, 2015). "Game Changer: How Carlton Fisk's home run altered baseball and TV". Sports Illustrated.
  11. ^ "World Series Gate Receipts and Player Shares". Baseball Almanac. Archived from the original on May 2, 2009. Retrieved June 14, 2009.

See also

References

  • Adelman, Tom. (2003). The Long Ball: The Summer of '75—Spaceman, Catfish, Charlie Hustle, and the Greatest World Series Ever Played. Boston, Massachusetts: Little, Brown. ISBN 0-316-06899-3.
  • Frost, Mark. (2009). Game Six: Cincinnati, Boston, and the 1975 World Series: The Triumph of America's Pastime. New York: Hyperion. ISBN 1-4013-2310-3.
  • Gammons, Peter. (1985). Beyond the Sixth Game: What's Happened to Baseball Since the Greatest Game in World Series History. Boston, Massachusetts: Houghton Mifflin. ISBN 0-395-35345-9.
  • Hornig, Doug. (2003). The Boys of October: How the 1975 Boston Red Sox Embodied Baseball's Ideals—and Restored Our Spirits. New York: McGraw-Hill. ISBN 0-07-140247-0.
  • Lowitt, Bruce. (1999). "Rats! Fisk's homer" St. Petersburg Times, November 23, 1999
  • Neft, David S., and Richard M. Cohen. (1990). The World Series. 1st ed. New York: St Martins. ISBN 0-312-03960-3. (Neft and Cohen 355–360)
  • Posnanski, Joe. (2009). The Machine: A Hot Team, a Legendary Season, and a Heart-stopping World Series: The Story of the 1975 Cincinnati Reds. New York: William Morrow. ISBN 0-06-158256-5.
  • Reichler, Joseph, ed. (1982). The Baseball Encyclopedia (5th ed.), p. 2197. Macmillan Publishing. ISBN 0-02-579010-2.

External links

1975 American League Championship Series

The 1975 American League Championship Series pitted the Boston Red Sox against the three-time defending world champion Oakland Athletics for the right to advance to the 1975 World Series. The Red Sox swept the series 3-0 to win their first AL pennant since 1967, and simultaneously end the A's run of three consecutive world championships.

1975 World Series of Poker

The 1975 World Series of Poker (WSOP) was a series of poker tournaments held in May 1975 at Binion's Horseshoe.

Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame

The Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame was instituted in 1995 to recognize the careers of former Boston Red Sox baseball players. A 15-member selection committee of Red Sox broadcasters and executives, past and present media personnel, and representatives from The Sports Museum of New England and the BoSox Club are responsible for nominating candidates.

Carlton Fisk

Carlton Ernest Fisk (born December 26, 1947), nicknamed "Pudge" and "The Commander", is a retired Major League Baseball (MLB) catcher and a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame. During a 24-year baseball career, he played for both the Boston Red Sox (1969, 1971–1980) and Chicago White Sox (1981–1993). He was the first player to be unanimously voted American League Rookie of the Year (1972). Fisk is best known for "waving fair" his game-winning home run in the 12th inning of Game 6 of the 1975 World Series.

At the time of his retirement, Fisk held the record for most home runs all-time by a catcher with 351 (since surpassed by Mike Piazza). He has held several age- or longevity-related records, including the record for most games played at the position of catcher with 2,226 (later surpassed by Iván Rodríguez). Fisk still holds the American League record for most years served behind the plate (24). Fisk was voted to the All-Star team 11 times and won three Silver Slugger Awards which is awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position.

Fisk was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2000.

Ed Armbrister

Edison Rosanda Armbrister (born July 4, 1948 in Nassau, Bahamas) is a former outfielder in Major League Baseball who had a five-year career from 1973 through 1977 with the Cincinnati Reds. Originally in the Houston Astros system, he was traded to the Reds in the deal that sent Joe Morgan, César Gerónimo, Denis Menke and Jack Billingham to Cincinnati for Lee May, Tommy Helms and Jimmy Stewart.

Armbrister is best remembered for his involvement in a controversial play in the 1975 World Series. In the tenth inning of Game Three, with César Gerónimo on base and nobody out, Armbrister collided with Boston Red Sox catcher Carlton Fisk at home plate while starting to run out a sacrifice bunt, leading to a wild throw by Fisk to second base that allowed Gerónimo to reach third base and eventually score the winning run; home plate umpire Larry Barnett did not make an interference call on Armbrister, a decision which was a source of heated debate after the Reds won the game 6–5.

After baseball, he returned to the Bahamas. He was a craps table croupier at Resorts International’s Paradise Island Casino and worked for at least one other establishment in the gaming business, a staple of the Bahamian tourist economy. As of 2006, he was with the Local Government and Consumer Affairs agency, on Arawak Cay, a popular attraction in the Nassau area. He also served as a consultant to the Ministry of Sports and managed the Bahamian junior national team. In his downtime, Armbrister became a notable local softball player.In 2008, he was inducted into the Bahamas National Hall of Fame.

Eephus pitch

An Eephus pitch (also spelled Ephus) in baseball is a very low-speed junk pitch. The delivery from the pitcher has very low velocity and usually catches the hitter off-guard. Its invention is attributed to Rip Sewell of the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 1940s, although according to historians John Thorn and John Holway, the first pitcher to throw a big blooper pitch was Bill Phillips, who played in the National League on and off from 1890 through 1903. The practice then lay dormant for nearly 40 years until Sewell resurrected it. According to manager Frankie Frisch, the pitch was named by outfielder Maurice Van Robays. When asked what it meant, Van Robays replied, "'Eephus ain't nothing, and that's a nothing pitch." Although the origin is not known for certain, "Eephus" may come from the Hebrew word אפס (pronounced EF-əs), meaning "nothing".

The Eephus pitch is thrown overhand like most pitches, but is characterized by an unusual, high arcing trajectory. The corresponding slow velocity bears more resemblance to a slow-pitch softball delivery than to a traditional baseball pitch. It is considered a trick pitch because, in comparison to normal baseball pitches, which run from 70 to 100 miles per hour (110 to 160 km/h), an Eephus pitch appears to move in slow motion at 55 mph (89 km/h) or less, sometimes into the low-40s mph (66–69 km/h).

In flight

In baseball, the rules state that a batted ball is considered in flight when it has not yet touched any object other than a fielder or his equipment.

Once a batted ball touches the ground, a fence or wall, a foul pole, a base, the pitcher's rubber, an umpire, or a baserunner, it is no longer in flight. A batted ball that passes entirely out of the playing field ceases to be in flight when that occurs.

A special rule exists in covered baseball facilities (retractable or fixed roofed), where a batted ball striking the roof, roof supporting structure, or objects suspended from the roof (e.g., speakers) while in fair territory is still considered to be in flight. Rules for batted balls striking any of those objects in foul territory differ between ballparks, with most considering such a ball to still be in flight, and some considering it to be a foul ball and dead from the time it strikes.

If a batted ball (other than a foul tip, with less than 2 strikes) is caught in flight, the batter is out—called a fly out—and all runners must tag up. A batted ball cannot be ruled foul or fair while in flight; a batted ball that is past first or third base will be called foul or fair based on where it ceases to be in flight, or where it is first touched by a fielder, whichever occurs first. A fly out on a ball in foul territory is also called a foul out. A foul tip, which by definition is always caught in flight, is a strike by special rule, and not an out, unless caught as a 3rd strike.

If a batted ball passes out of the playing field in flight and is fair, it is an automatic home run, entitling the batter and all runners to score without liability to be put out. However, if the fence or other barrier is less than 250 feet from home plate, a ball hit past that fence in flight and fair shall be ruled an automatic double. In the United States, such short fences are very rare even in the lowest-level amateur ballfields. Fields with short fences can be commonplace in some countries where baseball is less popular; often, soccer fields have to be used, resulting in a very short left or right field.

The shortest fair fences in Major League Baseball are both in Boston's Fenway Park; the shortest fence that is nearly perpendicular to the foul line is the Green Monster. The left foul pole, renamed "Fisk's Pole" in honor of Carlton Fisk's famous home run in the 1975 World Series, stands 310 feet away from home plate. The right field foul pole, known as Pesky's Pole, is 302 feet down the right field line, although the wall there is nearly parallel to the foul line as it curves back to the distant right field wall at 380 feet. From 1958 through 1961, the Los Angeles Dodgers played home games in Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, a stadium built for track and field; without the ability to move any of the permanent stadium structure, the Dodgers configured the field to result in a 251-foot left field foul line distance.

Juan Beníquez

Juan José Beníquez Torres (born May 13, 1950) is a former center fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Boston Red Sox, Texas Rangers, New York Yankees, Seattle Mariners, California Angels, Baltimore Orioles, Kansas City Royals and Toronto Blue Jays in all or parts of 17 seasons spanning 1971–1988. Listed at 5' 11" (1.82 m), 150 lb. (68 k), Beníquez batted and threw right-handed. He was born in the city of San Sebastián, Puerto Rico.

A valuable role player for a long time, Beníquez spent 17 years in the major leagues playing for eight different American League clubs. He started his career with the Red Sox in 1971, appearing at shortstop as a backup for Luis Aparicio in part of two seasons, and later was switched to center field.

A Gold Glove Award winner with Texas in 1977, Beníquez posted four consecutive .300 seasons with California and Baltimore from 1983 through 1986, with a career-high .336 in 1984, and also hit three home runs in a game for the Orioles in 1986. He appeared in the postseason three times, including the 1975 World Series with the Red Sox.

A .274 career hitter, Beníquez hit 79 home runs with 610 runs and 476 RBI in 1500 games played. After his major league career was over, he held the record for having played for eight American League teams.

Beníquez hit .359 while playing for the St. Lucie Legends of the Senior Professional Baseball Association in 1989.

Larry Barnett

Lawrence Robert Barnett (born January 3, 1945) is a former umpire in Major League Baseball who worked in the American League from 1969 to 1999 before becoming the major leagues' supervisor of umpires from 2000 to 2001. He is perhaps well remembered for a controversial call in Game 3 of the 1975 World Series while working home plate in the 10th inning that led to the Reds winning the game. He was also the home plate umpire for the infamous Jeffrey Maier game, but did not have anything to do with the controversy.

Merv Rettenmund

Mervin Weldon Rettenmund (born June 6, 1943) is an American former Major League Baseball player and coach. He played thirteen seasons with the Baltimore Orioles (1968–73), the Cincinnati Reds (1974–75), the San Diego Padres (1976–77) and the California Angels (1979–80).

He helped the Orioles win the 1969 and 1971 American League pennant, the 1970 World Series and the 1973 AL Eastern Division, the Reds win the 1975 World Series and the Angels win the 1979 AL Western Division. He also served as hitting coach for the 1989 World Series champion Oakland Athletics, as well as the Athletics' 1990 A.L. pennant-winners, and the 1998 National League champion Padres.

He finished 19th in voting for the 1971 AL MVP for playing in 141 Games and having 491 At Bats, 81 Runs, 156 Hits, 23 Doubles, 4 Triples, 11 Home Runs, 75 RBI, 15 Stolen Bases, 87 Walks, .318 Batting Average (which was third best in the American League to Bobby Murcer of the New York Yankees [.331], and Tony Oliva of the Minnesota Twins [.337]), .422 On-base percentage, .448 Slugging Percentage, 220 Total Bases, 4 Sacrifice Hits, 3 Sacrifice Flies and 2 Intentional Walks.

After the trade of Frank Robinson to the Los Angeles Dodgers in early-December 1971, Rettenmund began the 1972 season as the Orioles' starting right fielder. By 1973, he was out of the starting lineup due to injuries, prolonged batting slumps and the emergence of Al Bumbry and Rich Coggins. Rettenmund, along with Junior Kennedy and Bill Wood, was sent to the Cincinnati Reds for Ross Grimsley and Wally Williams on December 4, 1973.In 13 seasons, he played in 1,023 Games and had 2,555 At Bats, 393 Runs, 693 Hits, 114 Doubles, 16 Triples, 66 Home Runs, 329 RBI, 68 Stolen Bases, 445 Walks, .271 Batting Average, .381 On-base percentage, .406 Slugging Percentage, 1,037 Total Bases, 36 Sacrifice Hits, 20 Sacrifice Flies and 15 Intentional Walks. He recorded a .985 Fielding Percentage at all 3 outfield positions in his major league career.

After his major league career, Rettenmund served as hitting coach for the Texas Rangers (1983–85), the Athletics (1989–90), the Padres (1991–99), the Atlanta Braves (2000–01), and the Detroit Tigers (2002).

After three years out of the majors, Rettenmund returned as hitting coach of the Padres in June, 2006, replacing Dave Magadan. However, he himself was replaced in mid-season the next year (July 31, 2007), by Wally JoynerRettenmund currently resides in San Diego, California.

Mr. Red

Mr. Red is the first mascot of the Cincinnati Reds baseball team. He is a humanoid figure dressed in a Reds uniform, with an oversized baseball for a head. Sometimes, Mr. Red is referred to by the team as "The Running Man" for the way he has posed on the logo c. 1968.

Mr. Red was created by Henry "Hank" Zureick, the Reds Publicity Director. The character first appeared on the cover of the 1953 Cincinnati Red Stockings yearbook, which was also produced by Mr. Zureick, along with many yearbooks and programs during his career.

Mr. Red made his first appearance on a Reds uniform as a sleeve patch in 1955. The patch featured Mr. Red's head, clad in an old-fashioned white pillbox baseball cap with red stripes. The following season, 1956, saw the Reds adopt sleeveless jerseys, and Mr. Red was eliminated from the home uniform. He was moved to the left breast of the road uniform, and remained there for one season before being eliminated entirely.

In 1999, the Reds re-designed their uniform and "Mr. Red" was reintroduced as a sleeve patch on the undershirt.

A human version of the mascot had appeared in 1972 and went full time in 1973 season. By the end of 1973 Tom Kindig replaced his older brother Chuck as the day to day Mr. Red mascot for remainder of the 70's. Many viewed Mr. Red nationally in Game 5 of 1975 World Series, when he appeared on screen during the NBC broadcast (see the DVD version available on A&E Video). The mascot disappeared in the late 1980s for unknown reasons. The costumed mascot was reintroduced in 1997.

Mr. Red was joined by Gapper, a new furry mascot created by David Raymond (the original Phillie Phanatic), as the franchise moved to Great American Ballpark in 2003. In 2007, the current Mr. Red has been supplemented by a retro 1950s version known as "Mr. Redlegs", complete with handlebar mustache and old fashioned baseball uniform. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, Mr. Red wore uniform number 27.

The humanoid Mr. Red retired in 2007 leaving "Gapper" and a mascoted "Mr. Redlegs" to take his place. In August 2008, a female companion named "Rosie Red" named in honor of the group that supports the team, the Rosie Reds, was introduced. A new Mr. Red Mascot was unveiled at Redsfest for the 2012 season, the mascot is now on the field with "Gapper" and "Rosie Red" and "Mr. Redlegs."

Ned Martin

Edwin "Ned" Martin III (August 9, 1923 – July 23, 2002) was an American sportscaster, known primarily as a play-by-play announcer for Major League Baseball's Boston Red Sox from 1961 to 1992.

Pat Darcy

Patrick Leonard Darcy (born May 12, 1950) is a former right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Cincinnati Reds from 1974 to 1976.

Signed as an amateur free agent in 1969 by the Houston Astros, Darcy came to the Cincinnati Reds organization in 1974 when he was exchanged for Denis Menke.

Darcy is best known as the pitcher who gave up Carlton Fisk's walk-off home run in Game 6 of the 1975 World Series. After beginning the 1976 season with the Reds, Darcy was demoted to the team's Indianapolis Indians farm club in June of that year. Darcy would never again pitch at the major league level.

Darcy was born near Dayton, Ohio. His family relocated to Tucson, Arizona when he was a small child, and he considers Tucson his hometown; Darcy was a standout high school outfielder and pitcher for Rincon High School. Before becoming a professional pitcher, he attended and played for Mesa Community College. Darcy returned to Tucson after his major league career, earning his degree at the University of Arizona, starting his family, becoming active in the real estate industry and various aspects of local civic life. Darcy hosted local sports talk radio programs, ran for mayor of Tucson twice, and drew upon his connections and relationships in Major League Baseball to help bring the Colorado Rockies to Tucson in 1993 as a spring training team.

Rick Miller (baseball)

Richard Alan (Rick) Miller (born April 19, 1948) is an American former outfielder in Major League Baseball from 1971 to 1985. Miller attended Grand Rapids Union High School and was a star athlete in the Grand Rapids City League. He spent 12 of his 15 seasons as a member of the Boston Red Sox, he also played with the California Angels. Miller was an accomplished fielder who won a Gold Glove in 1978 for his play in center field.

In a 15-year career covering 1482 games, Miller compiled a .269 batting average (1046-for-3887) with 552 runs, 28 home runs and 369 RBI. Defensively, he recorded a .986 fielding percentage at all three outfield positions and first base. In the postseason, in the 1975 World Series and 1979 American League Championship Series, he batted .222 (4-for-18) with 2 runs scored.

In 2007, Miller was named as the manager of the Nashua Pride of the Canadian American Association of Professional Baseball, a team he managed through the end of the 2008 season. In 2012, he was named the manager of the New Bedford Bay Sox of the New England Collegiate Baseball League.Miller is the brother in law of former teammate Carlton Fisk, having married Fisk's sister Janet.

Rick Wise

Richard Charles Wise (born September 13, 1945) is a former professional baseball pitcher. A right-hander, he played in Major League Baseball for 18 seasons (1964, 1966–82), primarily as a starting pitcher. He was the winning pitcher for the Boston Red Sox in Game 6 of the 1975 World Series, considered by some to be the greatest Series game ever played.

Ross Edwards

Ross Edwards (born 1 December 1942) is a former Australian cricketer. Edwards played in 20 Tests for Australia, playing against England, West Indies and Pakistan. He also played in nine One Day Internationals including the 1975 Cricket World Cup series. He was a right-handed batsman and superb cover fielder as well as a part-time wicket-keeper.

Edwards was born in December 1942 in Cottesloe, Western Australia. His father, Edmund Edwards, played twice for Western Australia as a wicket-keeper.In the 1971–72 Sheffield Shield season he made four centuries and went to England in 1972 at the age of 29 and got his first chance at Nottingham where he made an unbeaten 170. He made ducks in his next two innings however.

In 1974–75 Edwards scored his second century against England when he hit 115 in the Perth Test match. He made 99 at Lord's in 1975.

World Series Cricket beckoned in 1977, after which he failed to reach national selection.

Sailor Roberts

Bryan W. "Sailor" Roberts (March 7, 1931 – June 23, 1995) was an American professional poker player.

Before becoming a poker professional, Roberts was a rounder and traveled the country looking for games with Doyle Brunson and Amarillo Slim. In addition to his career as a poker player, he was also a renowned contract bridge player.Roberts participated in the first World Series of Poker in 1970 along with Amarillo Slim, Doyle Brunson, Puggy Pearson, Crandell Addington, and Carl Cannon. Roberts won his first WSOP bracelet at the 1974 World Series of Poker in the $5,000 Deuce to Seven Draw event. He won the 1975 World Series of Poker Main Event, gaining his second and final WSOP bracelet and $210,000.Roberts earned his nickname "Sailor" for having served in the United States Navy during the Korean War.Roberts died on June 23, 1995 from cirrhosis caused by hepatitis.He was posthumously inducted into the Poker Hall of Fame in 2012.

Satch Davidson

David "Satch" Davidson (January 18, 1936 – August 21, 2010) was a Major League Baseball umpire in the National League from 1969 to 1984. During his career, Davidson was behind the plate for Hank Aaron's 715th home run which broke Babe Ruth's career record and he called the game in which Carlton Fisk hit a game-winning home run in game 6 of the 1975 World Series. Davidson wore uniform number 4 when the National League adopted umpire uniform numbers in 1970.

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