1975 College Football All-America Team

The 1975 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1975. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes four selectors as "official" for the 1975 season. They are:[1] (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA);[2] (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers;[3] (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) selected by the nation's football writers;[4] and (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers.[5] Other selectors included Football News (FN),[6] the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA),[7] The Sporting News (TSN),[8] Time magazine,[9] and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC).

Two players were unanimously selected by all four official selectors and all five unofficial selectors. They were defensive linemen Steve Niehaus of Notre Dame and Lee Roy Selmon of Oklahoma.

The 1975 Oklahoma Sooners football team had eight players who received first-team honors. The Oklahoma honorees were Lee Roy Selmon, receiver Tinker Owens, offensive tackle Mike Vaughan, offensive guard Terry Webb, defensive end Jimbo Elrod, defensive tackle James White, middle guard Dewey Selmon, and return specialist Joe Washington. Ohio State followed with five first-team honorees: offensive guard Ted Smith, quarterback Cornelius Greene, running back and Heisman Trophy winner Archie Griffin, defensive back Tim Fox, and punter Tom Skladany.

Consensus All-Americans

The following chart identifies the NCAA-recognized consensus All-Americans for the year 1975 and displays which first-team designations they received.

Name Position School Number[10] Official Other
Archie Griffin Running back Ohio State 4/5/9 AFCA, FWAA, AP, UPI FN, NEA, TSN, Time, WC
Steve Niehaus Defensive tackle Notre Dame 4/5/9 AFCA, AP, FWAA, UPI FN, NEA, TSN, Time, WC
Lee Roy Selmon Defensive tackle Oklahoma 4/5/9 AFCA, AP, FWAA, UPI FN, NEA, TSN, Time, WC
Greg Buttle Linebacker Penn State 3/5/8 AP, FWAA, UPI FN, NEA, Time, TSN, WC
Chuck Muncie Running back California 3/5/8 AP, FWAA, UPI FN, NEA, TSN, Time, WC
Ed Simonini Linebacker Texas A&M 4/3/7 AFCA, AP, FWAA, UPI FN, TSN, WC
Tim Fox Defensive back Ohio State 3/4/7 AFCA, FWAA, UPI NEA, TSN, Time, WC
Ricky Bell Running back USC 4/2/6 AFCA, AP, FWAA, UPI FN, WC
Leroy Cook Defensive end Alabama 4/2/6 AFCA, AP, FWAA, UPI FN, WC
Rik Bonness Center Nebraska 4/2/6 AFCA, AP, FWAA, UPI FN, WC
Chet Moeller Defensive back Navy 4/2/6 AFCA, AP, FWAA, UPI FN, WC
Bob Simmons Offensive tackle Texas 3/3/6 AFCA, AP, UPI FN, NEA, WC
Pat Thomas Defensive back Texas A&M 3/3/6 AFCA, AP, UPI FN, NEA, WC
Dennis Lick Offensive tackle Wisconsin 2/4/6 AFCA, UPI NEA, TSN, Time, WC
Steve Rivera Wide receiver California 3/2/5 AFCA, AP, UPI FN, WC
John Sciarra Quarterback UCLA 3/2/5 AFCA, AP, UPI NEA, WC
Dewey Selmon Middle guard Oklahoma 3/2/5 AFCA, AP, UPI FN, WC
Randy Johnson Offensive guard Georgia 3/1/4 AFCA, AP, UPI WC
Ted Smith Offensive guard Ohio State 2/2/4 AP, FWAA FN, NEA
Jimbo Elrod Defensive end Oklahoma 2/1/3 AP, UPI WC
Sammy Green Linebacker Florida 2/1/3 AP, FWAA NEA
Larry Seivers Wide receiver Tennessee 1/1/2 AP FN

Offense

Receivers

Tight ends

Tackles

Guards

Centers

  • Rik Bonness, Nebraska (AFCA, AP-1, FWAA, UPI-1, FN, WC)
  • Pete Brock, Colorado (UPI-2, NEA-1, Time, TSN)
  • James Files, McNeese State (AP-2)
  • Ray Pinney, Washington (NEA-2)
  • Leo Tierney, Georgia Tech (AP-3)

Quarterbacks

Running backs

Defense

Defensive ends

  • Leroy Cook, Alabama (AFCA, AP-1, FWAA, UPI-1, FN, NEA-2, WC)
  • Jimbo Elrod, Oklahoma (AP-1, UPI-1, WC)
  • Troy Archer, Colorado (Time)
  • Bob Martin, Nebraska (AP-2, UPI-2, FN)
  • Jimmy Lisko, Arkansas State (AP-2)
  • Duncan McColl, Stanford (UPI-2)
  • Kim Bokamper, San Jose State (NEA-2)
  • Randy Cozens, Pittsburgh (AP-3)
  • Nate Toran, Rutgers (AP-3)

Defensive tackles

Middle guards

Linebackers

  • Ed Simonini, Texas A&M (AFCA, AP-1, FWAA, UPI-1, FN, NEA-2, TSN, WC)
  • Greg Buttle, Penn State (AP-1, FWAA, UPI-1, FN, NEA-1, Time, TSN, WC)
  • Sammy Green, Florida (AP-1, FWAA, NEA-1)
  • Kevin McLain, Colorado State (UPI-2, NEA-1, TSN, Time)
  • Woody Lowe, Alabama (UPI-1)
  • Larry Gordon, Arizona State (NEA-2, Time)
  • Ray Preston, Syracuse (AFCA, AP-3, UPI-2)
  • Reggie Williams, Dartmouth (AFCA, AP-2, NEA-2)
  • Garth Ten Nappel, Texas A&M (AP-2, NEA-1)
  • Brian Ruff, The Citadel (AP-2)
  • Phil Heck, California (UPI-2)
  • Calvin O'Neal, Michigan (NEA-2)
  • Gary Spani, Kansas State (AP-3)
  • Donnie Thomas, Indiana (AP-3)

Defensive backs

  • Tim Fox, Ohio State (AFCA, AP-3, FWAA, UPI-1, NEA-1, TSN, Time, WC)
  • Pat Thomas, Texas A&M (AFCA, AP-1, UPI-1, FN, NEA-1, WC)
  • Chet Moeller, Navy (AFCA, AP-1, FWAA, UPI-1, FN, NEA-2, WC)
  • Mike Haynes, Arizona State (AFCA, AP-1, UPI-2, FN, NEA-1, TSN, Time)
  • Don Dufek, Michigan (AFCA, FWAA, UPI-2, FN, WC)
  • James Hunter, Grambling (NEA-1, TSN, Time)
  • Kurt Knoff, Kansas (AP-3, NEA-2, TSN, Time)
  • Wonder Monds, Nebraska (FWAA)
  • Jim Bolding, East Carolina (AP-2)
  • Lester Hayes, Texas A&M (AP-2)
  • Shafer, Ball State (AP-2)
  • Danny Reece, USC (UPI-2)
  • Bill Armstrong, Wake Forest (AP-3, NEA-2)
  • Tom Marvaso, Cincinnati (NEA-2)

Special teams

Kickers

  • Chris Bahr, Penn State (UPI-1, TSN, Time, WC)
  • Bob Berg, New Mexico (FWAA)
  • Dave Lawson, Air Force (UPI-2, FN)

Punters

Returner

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Football Award Winners" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). 2016. p. 10. Retrieved October 21, 2017.
  2. ^ a b "UT, Aggies Each Have Two On Coaches' A-A". Valley Morning Star. November 26, 1975. p. 8.
  3. ^ a b "OSU places two on All-America list". The Xenia Daily Gazette. December 2, 1975. p. 7.
  4. ^ a b "Leroy Named For Outland". Panama City News-Herald. Associated Press. December 4, 1975. p. 20. Retrieved May 19, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ a b "Griffin earns All America honors third straight year". The Pocono Record. December 4, 1975. p. 15.
  6. ^ a b "Buckeyes, Sooners Head Football News Team". Kingsport (TN) Times. November 27, 1975. p. 7C.
  7. ^ a b Murray Olderman (December 5, 1975). "Sciarra Heads NEA Team". Kingsport (TN) News. p. 4C.
  8. ^ a b "Griffin Heads Magazine All-Stars". The Logan (OH) Daily News. December 10, 1975. p. 9.
  9. ^ a b "Time All-America". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. December 11, 1975. p. 2B.
  10. ^ This column lists the number of selectors choosing the player as a first-team All-American as follows: official selectors/other selectors/total selectors.
1975 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1975 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1975 NCAA Division I football season. The selectors for the 1975 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1975 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1975 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1975 Big Ten Conference football season.

1975 All-Pacific-8 Conference football team

The 1975 All-Pacific-8 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific-8 Conference teams for the 1975 NCAA Division I football season.

1975 All-SEC football team

The 1975 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1975 NCAA Division I football season. Alabama won the conference.

1975 All-Southwest Conference football team

The 1975 All-Southwest Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Southwest Conference teams for the 1975 NCAA Division I football season. The selectors for the 1975 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1975 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1975 Big Ten Conference football season was the 80th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1975 NCAA Division I football season.

The 1975 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, under head coach Woody Hayes, compiled an 11–0 record in the regular season, won the Big Ten championship, led the conference in scoring offense (32.0 points per game) and scoring defense (8.5 points allowed per game), and lost to UCLA in the 1976 Rose Bowl. Running back Archie Griffin won the 1975 Heisman Trophy, becoming the only two-time Heisman winner. Quarterback Cornelius Greene won the Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the Big Ten's most valuable player, and Pete Johnson led the conference with 156 points scored. Griffin, defensive back Tim Fox, and offensive guard Ted Smith were consensus first-team All-Americans.

The 1975 Michigan Wolverines football team, under head coach Bo Schembechler, compiled an 8–2–2 record, finished in second place in the Big Ten, and lost to Oklahoma in the 1976 Orange Bowl. Gordon Bell gained 1,390 rushing yards and was selected as Michigan's most valuable player and a unanimous first-team All-Big Ten player. Defensive back Don Dufek was selected as a first-team All-American by the American Football Coaches Association, Football Writers Association of America, Football News, and the Walter Camp Football Foundation.

The 1975 Michigan State Spartans football team, under head coach Denny Stolz, compiled a 7–4 record and finished in third place in the Big Ten. Charley Baggett led the team with 1,499 total yards, and Levi Jackson gained 1,063 rushing yards and was selected as the team's most valuable player.

Other conference leaders included Minnesota quarterback Tony Dungy with 1,515 passing yards and 1,759 yards of total offense and Purdue wide receiver Scott Yelvington with 686 receiving yards. Wisconsin offensive tackle Dennis Lick was a consensus first-team All-American.

1975 NCAA Division I football season

The 1975 NCAA Division I football season saw University of Oklahoma repeat as national champion in the Associated Press (AP) writers' poll, and were ranked #1 in the United Press International (UPI) coaches' poll, just ahead of runner up Arizona State, runner-up in both final polls, despite having an undefeated 12–0 season and a win over Nebraska in the Fiesta Bowl.

During the 20th century, the NCAA had no playoff for major college football, teams that would later be described as "Division I-A". The NCAA Football Guide, however, did note an "unofficial national champion" based on the top ranked teams in the "wire service" (AP and UPI) polls. The "writers' poll" by Associated Press (AP) was the most popular, followed by the "coaches' poll" by United Press International) (UPI). The AP poll consisted of the votes of as many as 63 writers, though not all voted in each poll, and the UPI poll was taken of a 25-member board of coaches.

Don Buckey

Donald Charles Buckey (born November 9, 1953) is a former American football wide receiver in the NFL for the New York Jets.

Buckey was the seventh player taken in the twelfth round of the 1976 NFL Draft directly before his twin brother Dave Buckey. Don is the receiving half of NC State's Buckey Twins. Don was a member of the 1975 College Football All-America Team and the NC State Wolfpack football team.

Kenmore High School

Kenmore High School was a public high school in Akron, Ohio. It was 1 of 7 high schools in the Akron Public Schools district. The schools mascot was the Cardinals. They were a member of the Akron City Series athletic conference.

Sammy Green

Samuel Lee Green (born October 12, 1954) is an American former college and professional football player who was a linebacker in the National Football League (NFL) for five seasons during the 1970s and early 1980s. He played college football for the University of Florida, and received All-American honors. A second-round pick in the 1976 NFL Draft, Green played professionally for the Seattle Seahawks and the Houston Oilers of the NFL.

1975 College Football All-America Team consensus selections
Offense
Defense

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