1974 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1974 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 45th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 23, 1974, at Three Rivers Stadium in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania the home of the Pittsburgh Pirates of the National League. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 7–2.

This marked the third time the Pirates had been host for the All-Star Game (the first two having been in 1944 and the first game in 1959). This would be the first of two times that the game would be played at Three Rivers Stadium, with the stadium hosting again in 1994.

1974 Major League Baseball All-Star Game
1974MLBAllStarGameLogo
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
American League 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 1[1]
National League 0 1 0 2 1 0 1 2 x 7 10 1[1]
DateJuly 23, 1974[1][2]
VenueThree Rivers Stadium[1][2]
CityPittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Managers
MVPSteve Garvey (LA)
Attendance50,706[1]
Ceremonial first pitchJohn W. Galbreath
TelevisionNBC
TV announcersCurt Gowdy, Joe Garagiola and Tony Kubek
RadioNBC
Radio announcersJim Simpson and Maury Wills

American League roster

The American League roster included 10 future Hall of Fame players, denoted in italics.[2][3]

Elected starters

Position Player Team Notes
C Carlton Fisk Boston Red Sox injured
1B Dick Allen Chicago White Sox
2B Rod Carew Minnesota Twins
3B Brooks Robinson Baltimore Orioles
SS Bert Campaneris Oakland Athletics
OF Reggie Jackson Oakland Athletics
OF Bobby Murcer New York Yankees
OF Jeff Burroughs Texas Rangers

Pitchers

Throws Pitcher Team Notes
RH Steve Busby Kansas City Royals did not pitch
RH Mike Cuellar Baltimore Orioles did not pitch
RH Rollie Fingers Oakland Athletics
LH John Hiller Detroit Tigers did not pitch
RH Catfish Hunter Oakland Athletics
RH Gaylord Perry Cleveland Indians starting pitcher
RH Luis Tiant Boston Red Sox
LH Wilbur Wood Chicago White Sox did not pitch

Reserve position players

Position Player Team Notes
C Ed Herrmann Chicago White Sox did not play
C Thurman Munson New York Yankees replaced Fisk in starting lineup
C Darrell Porter Milwaukee Brewers did not play
C Jim Sundberg Texas Rangers
1B John Mayberry Kansas City Royals
1B Carl Yastrzemski Boston Red Sox
2B Bobby Grich Baltimore Orioles
2B Cookie Rojas Kansas City Royals
3B Sal Bando Oakland Athletics injured
3B Dave Chalk California Angels
3B Don Money Milwaukee Brewers
OF George Hendrick Cleveland Indians
OF Al Kaline Detroit Tigers
OF Frank Robinson California Angels
OF Joe Rudi Oakland Athletics

Coaching staff

Position Manager Team
Manager Dick Williams California Angels
Coach Whitey Herzog California Angels
Coach Jack McKeon Kansas City Royals
Coach Earl Weaver Baltimore Orioles

National League roster

The National League roster included 7 future Hall of Fame players, denoted in italics.[2][3]

Elected starters

Position Player Team Notes
C Johnny Bench Cincinnati Reds
1B Steve Garvey Los Angeles Dodgers
2B Joe Morgan Cincinnati Reds
3B Ron Cey Los Angeles Dodgers
SS Larry Bowa Philadelphia Phillies
OF Hank Aaron Atlanta Braves
OF Pete Rose Cincinnati Reds
OF Jimmy Wynn Los Angeles Dodgers

Pitchers

Throws Pitcher Team Notes
LH Ken Brett Pittsburgh Pirates
RH Buzz Capra Atlanta Braves did not pitch
LH Steve Carlton Philadelphia Phillies did not pitch
RH Mike Marshall Los Angeles Dodgers
LH Jon Matlack New York Mets
RH Lynn McGlothen St. Louis Cardinals
RH Andy Messersmith Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher
RH Steve Rogers Montréal Expos did not pitch

Reserve position players

Position Player Team Notes
C Jerry Grote New York Mets
C Ted Simmons St. Louis Cardinals did not play
1B Tony Pérez Cincinnati Reds
2B Dave Cash Philadelphia Phillies
3B Mike Schmidt Philadelphia Phillies
SS Don Kessinger Chicago Cubs
SS Chris Speier San Francisco Giants
OF Lou Brock St. Louis Cardinals
OF César Cedeño Houston Astros
OF Ralph Garr Atlanta Braves
OF Johnny Grubb San Diego Padres
OF Reggie Smith St. Louis Cardinals

Coaching staff

Position Manager Team
Manager Yogi Berra New York Mets
Coach Sparky Anderson Cincinnati Reds
Coach Red Schoendienst St. Louis Cardinals

Starting lineups

While the starters were elected by the fans, the batting orders and starting pitchers were selected by the managers.[2][4]

American League National League
Order Player Team Position Order Player Team Position
1 Rod Carew Minnesota Twins 2B 1 Pete Rose Cincinnati Reds LF
2 Bert Campaneris Oakland Athletics SS 2 Joe Morgan Cincinnati Reds 2B
3 Reggie Jackson Oakland Athletics RF 3 Hank Aaron Atlanta Braves RF
4 Dick Allen Chicago White Sox 1B 4 Johnny Bench Cincinnati Reds C
5 Bobby Murcer New York Yankees CF 5 Jimmy Wynn Los Angeles Dodgers CF
6 Jeff Burroughs Texas Rangers LF 6 Steve Garvey Los Angeles Dodgers 1B
7 Brooks Robinson Baltimore Orioles 3B 7 Ron Cey Los Angeles Dodgers 3B
8 Thurman Munson New York Yankees C 8 Larry Bowa Philadelphia Phillies SS
9 Gaylord Perry Cleveland Indians P 9 Andy Messersmith Los Angeles Dodgers P

Umpires

Position Umpire[4]
Home Plate Ed Sudol (NL)
First Base Art Frantz(AL)
Second Base Ed Vargo(NL)
Third Base Merle Anthony(AL)
Left Field John Kibler(NL)
Right Field George Maloney(AL)

Scoring summary

The National League took a 1–0 lead in the bottom of the second off of AL starter Gaylord Perry. With two outs, Steve Garvey singled, and then scored on Ron Cey's double.[1][5]

The American League responded immediately, scoring twice off of NL starter Andy Messersmith in the top of the third inning. Thurman Munson led off with a double to open the inning, and advanced to third base on a successful sacrifice bunt by Gaylord Perry. Rod Carew walked. The next batter, Bert Campaneris, struck out as Carew stole second base. Carew immediately advanced to third base on the throwing error by NL catcher Johnny Bench, which also allowed Munson to score. Reggie Jackson walked. Dick Allen singled sending Jackson to second base, and scoring Carew. This ended the scoring for the American League.[5]

The NL retook the lead with a two-run bottom of the fourth inning off of AL relief pitcher, Luis Tiant. Johnny Bench led off with a single, and advanced to third base when Jimmy Wynn singled in the next at-bat. Steve Garvey doubled, scoring Bench, and sending Wynn to third base. Ron Cey grounded out, permitting Garvey to advance to third base and scoring Wynn.[5]

In the bottom of the fifth inning, the NL added an unearned run. Pinch hitter Lou Brock singled. With Joe Morgan batting, Brock stole second base, and advanced to third base on a throwing error by AL catcher Thurman Munson. Morgan hit a sacrifice fly to the outfield, permitting Brock to tag up and score from third base, and extend the NL lead to 4–2.[5]

In the bottom of the seventh inning, with Catfish Hunter in his second inning of relief pitching for the AL, Reggie Smith led off with a home run to push the NL lead to 5–2.[5]

The NL closed out the game's scoring in the bottom of the eighth inning facing the new AL relief pitcher, Rollie Fingers. With one out, Mike Schmidt walked, and then scored on Don Kessinger's triple. With Mike Marshall batting, Kessinger scored when Fingers threw a wild pitch. The final two runs brought the final score to 7–2.[5]

Line score

Tuesday, July 23, 1974 8:15 pm (ET) at Three Rivers Stadium in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
American League 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 1
National League 0 1 0 2 1 0 1 2 X 7 10 1
WP: Ken Brett (1-0)   LP: Luis Tiant (0-1)
Home runs:
AL: None
NL: Reggie Smith (1)

Game notes and records

Ken Brett was credited with the win. Luis Tiant was credited with the loss.[4]

Dick Williams was manager of the American League squad by virtue of having been manager of the 1973 American League Champion Oakland Athletics. Williams left the team after the season, and was signed to manage the California Angels.

Steve Garvey's name was omitted from the ballots given to fans. He was elected to the NL squad by virtue of a successful write-in campaign.[1][2]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Total Baseball, 5th ed., 1997, Viking Press, Thorn, John et al. ed, p. 254
  2. ^ a b c d e f 1974 All-Star Game, baseball-almanac.com; accessed 1 November 2008
  3. ^ a b All-Star Results – 1974, @mlb.com; accessed 1 November 2008
  4. ^ a b c All-Star Game Box Score – 1974, @mlb.com; accessed 2 November 2008
  5. ^ a b c d e f 1974 All-Star Game Play-by-Play, @baseball-almanac.com; accessed 2 November 2008

External links

1974 Atlanta Braves season

The 1974 Atlanta Braves season was the ninth season in Atlanta along with the 104th season as a franchise overall. The team finished third in the National League West with a record of 88–74, 14 games behind the Los Angeles Dodgers. During the season, Braves outfielder Hank Aaron became the all-time career leader in home runs, surpassing Babe Ruth.

1974 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1974 Los Angeles Dodgers won the National League West by four games over the Cincinnati Reds, then beat the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 1974 National League Championship Series before losing to the Oakland Athletics in the 1974 World Series.

1974 Montreal Expos season

The 1974 Montreal Expos season was the sixth season in the history of the franchise. The Expos finished in fourth place in the National League East with a record of 79–82, 8½ games behind the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1974 Oakland Athletics season

The 1974 Oakland Athletics season involved the A's winning their fourth consecutive American League West title with a record of 90 wins and 72 losses. In the playoffs, the A's defeated the Baltimore Orioles in the ALCS for their third straight AL pennant, and in the World Series, the first ever played entirely on the West Coast, defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers in five games to take their third consecutive World Series championship. Paid attendance for the season was 845,693.In early 1974, owner Charlie Finley tried to sell the team with an asking price of $15 million.

1974 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1974 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 92nd season in franchise history. The Phillies finished in third place in the National League East with a record of 80 wins and 82 losses. They would not finish below .500 again until going 75–87 in 1985.

1974 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1974 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 93rd season of the Pittsburgh Pirates franchise; the 88th in the National League. The Pirates finished first in the National League East with a record of 88–74. The Pirates were defeated three games to one by the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 1974 National League Championship Series.

1974 San Diego Padres season

The 1974 San Diego Padres season was the sixth in franchise history. The team finished last in the National League West with a record of 60–102, 42 games behind the Los Angeles Dodgers.

1974 Texas Rangers season

The 1974 Texas Rangers season involved the Rangers finishing second in the American League West with a record of 84 wins and 76 losses (two rained-out games were never completed). It would be only the second time in franchise history (to that point) that the club finished over .500 and the first since the club relocated to Arlington, Texas. The club became the first (and, to date, only) team to finish over .500 after two consecutive 100-loss seasons.

1975 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1975 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 46th midseason exhibition between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was played on July 15, 1975, at Milwaukee County Stadium in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, home of the Milwaukee Brewers of the American League. The game resulted in a 6–3 victory for the NL.

While this was the first time that the Brewers were acting as hosts of the All-Star Game, this was not the first time the game had been played at Milwaukee County Stadium. The 1955 game had been played there when the Braves had called Milwaukee home. Thus, Milwaukee County Stadium joined Sportsman's Park in St. Louis and Shibe Park in Philadelphia as the only stadiums to host All-Star Games with two different franchises as host.

This would also be the last time Milwaukee County Stadium would host the game. When the game returned to Milwaukee in 2002, the Brewers had moved into their new home at Miller Park.

The 1975 All-Star Game saw the start of the tradition of naming honorary captains to the All-Star teams. The first honorary captains were Mickey Mantle (for the AL) and Stan Musial (for the NL).It would also mark the final All-Star Game in which only "The Star-Spangled Banner", sung this year by Glen Campbell, was performed prior to the game. Beginning the following year, "O Canada" would also be performed as part of the All-Star pregame ceremonies.

Andy Messersmith

John Alexander "Andy" Messersmith (born August 6, 1945 in Toms River, New Jersey) is a former Major League Baseball right-handed pitcher. During a 12-year baseball career, he pitched for the California Angels (1968–72), Los Angeles Dodgers (1973–75 and 1979), Atlanta Braves (1976–77) and the New York Yankees (1978). As a member of the Dodgers, he appeared in the 1974 World Series.

Buzz Capra

Lee William Capra (born October 1, 1947), is an American former professional baseball pitcher, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Mets and Atlanta Braves, from 1971 to 1977. Nicknamed "Buzz", by a neighbor as a child, Capra was a National League (NL) All-Star and the NL earned run average (ERA) leader, in 1974.

Meadowbrook High School (Chesterfield County, Virginia)

Meadowbrook High School is a high school located in Chesterfield County, Virginia. The school is home to the International Baccalaureate Program and Meadowbrook's Academy of Digital Entrepreneurship (M.A.D.E.) Specialty Centers. The school has one of the most diverse student bodies in the state and region with students representing over 60 nations.

Merle Anthony

George Merlyn Anthony (April 26, 1926 – February 2, 1993) was a professional baseball umpire who worked in the American League from 1969 to 1975. Anthony umpired the 1974 Major League Baseball All-Star Game and the 1973 American League Championship Series. In his career, he umpired 965 Major League games. Before his umpiring career, he was a Minor League Baseball player in 1946 and 1948. During the 1950s Merle played second base for his hometown Marysville Giants and the Yuba-Sutter Rebels where he gave younger players tips on how to improve their skills. His nickname was "Rabbit."

Ralph Garr

Ralph Allen Garr (born December 12, 1945) is a former Major League Baseball outfielder. Garr was a free swinger who could confound defenses by hitting to all parts of the outfield. Garr batted .300 or better five times during his career.

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