1974 College Football All-America Team

The 1974 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1974. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recognizes five selectors as "official" for the 1974 season. They are:[1] (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA);[2] (2) the Associated Press (AP) selected based on the votes of sports writers at AP newspapers;[3] (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) selected by the nation's football writers;[4] (4) the United Press International (UPI) selected based on the votes of sports writers at UPI newspapers;[5] and (5) the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WC). Other selectors included Football News (FN),[6] the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA),[7] The Sporting News (TSN),[8] and Time magazine.[9]

Six players were selected unanimously by all five of the official selectors. The six unanimous All-Americans included running backs Archie Griffin of Ohio State (the 1974 Heisman Trophy winner), Joe Washington of Oklahoma, and Anthony Davis of USC. On defense, the unanimous All-Americans were defensive back Dave Brown of Michigan, linebacker Rod Shoate of Oklahoma, and defensive end Randy White of Maryland.

The Ohio State and Oklahoma teams each had eight players who received first-team honors. The Ohio State honorees were Archie Griffin, tight end Doug France, tackle Kurt Schumacher, center Steve Myers, defensive end Van DeCree, defensive tackle Pete Cusick, defensive back Neal Colzie, and punter Tom Skladany. The Oklahoma honorees were Joe Washington, Rod Shoate, receiver Tinker Owens, guard John Roush, center Kyle Davis, defensive tackle Lee Roy Selmon, middle guard Dewey Selmon, and defensive back Randy Hughes.

Consensus All-Americans

The following chart identifies the NCAA-recognized consensus All-Americans for the year 1974 and displays which first-team designations they received.

Name Position School Number[10] Official Other
Dave Brown Defensive back Michigan 5/4/9 AFCA, AP, FWAA, UPI, WC FN, NEA, Time, TSN
Rod Shoate Linebacker Oklahoma 5/4/9 AFCA, AP, FWAA, UPI, WC FN, NEA, Time, TSN
Randy White Defensive end Maryland 5/4/9 AFCA, AP, FWAA, UPI, WC FN, NEA, Time, TSN
Archie Griffin Running back Ohio State 5/3/8 AFCA, AP, FWAA, UPI, WC FN, NEA, TSN
Joe Washington Running back Oklahoma 5/3/8 AFCA, AP, FWAA, UPI, WC FN, NEA, TSN
Anthony Davis Running back USC 5/2/7 AFCA, AP, FWAA, UPI, WC FN, TSN
Ken Huff Offensive guard North Carolina 4/3/7 AFCA, AP, UPI, WC NEA, Time, TSN
Kurt Schumacher Offensive tackle Ohio State 4/3/7 AFCA, FWAA, UPI, WC NEA, Time, TSN
Peter Demmerle Wide receiver Notre Dame 4/1/5 AFCA, AP, UPI, WC NEA
Mike Hartenstine Defensive tackle Penn State 4/0/4 AFCA, AP, FWAA, UPI --
Marvin Crenshaw Offensive tackle Nebraska 3/1/4 AFCA, FWAA, UPI FN
Ken Bernich Linebacker Auburn 3/0/3 AFCA, AP, WC --
Bennie Cunningham Tight end Clemson 3/0/3 AFCA, AP, UPI --
Pat Donovan Defensive end Stanford 3/0/3 AFCA, FWAA, UPI --
Steve Bartkowski Quarterback California 2/2/4 AP, UPI NEA, Time
Richard Wood Linebacker USC 2/2/4 AP, UPI FN, NEA
Gerry DiNardo Offensive guard Notre Dame 2/1/3 AFCA, UPI FN
Louie Kelcher Defensive tackle SMU 2/1/3 AP, FWAA FN
Woody Lowe Linebacker Alabama 2/1/3 UPI, WC FN
Steve Myers Center Ohio State 2/1/3 AP, UPI FN
John Roush Offensive guard Oklahoma 2/1/3 FWAA, UPI FN
Pat Thomas Defensive back Texas A&M 2/1/3 AP, FWAA NEA
Rubin Carter Middle guard Miami (FL) 2/0/2 AFCA, UPI --
Leroy Cook Defensive end Mississippi State 2/0/2 AP, FWAA --
John Provost Defensive back Holy Cross 2/0/2 AP, WC --
Jimmy Webb Defensive end Mississippi State 2/0/2 AFCA, WC --

Offense

Receivers

Tight ends

  • Bennie Cunningham, Clemson (AFCA, AP-1, UPI-1)
  • Jim O'Bradovich, USC (NEA-1)
  • Charles Waddell, North Carolina (TSN)
  • Elmore Stephens, Kentucky (Time-t)
  • Oscar Roan, Southern Methodist (Time-t)
  • Dan Natale, Penn State (UPI-2)
  • Doug France, Ohio State (NEA-2, Time [t])
  • Dick Pawlewicz, William & Mary (AP-3)

Tackles

Guards

  • Ken Huff, North Carolina (AFCA, AP-1, UPI-2, WC, NEA-1, Time, TSN)
  • Gerry DiNardo, Notre Dame (AFCA, UPI-1, FN)
  • John Roush, Oklahoma (AP-2, FWAA, UPI-1, FN)
  • Bill Bain, USC (TSN, Time)
  • Burton Lawless, Florida (NEA-1)
  • John Nessel, Penn State (WC)
  • Andy Dearman, VMI (AP-2)
  • Revie Sorey, Illinois (NEA-2)
  • Carl Dean, New Mexico State (AP-3)
  • Steve Ostermann, Washington State (AP-3, UP-2)

Centers

  • Steve Myers, Ohio State (AP-1 [g], UPI-1, FN, NEA-2 [g])
  • Rik Bonness, Nebraska (AP-1)
  • Geoff Reece, Washington State (WC, NEA-2, Time)
  • Sylvester Croom, Alabama (AFCA, UP-2)
  • Aubrey Schulz, Baylor (AP-2, FWAA)
  • Rick Nuzum, Kentucky (NEA-1)
  • Kyle Davis, Oklahoma (TSN)
  • Jack Balorunos, Penn State (AP-3)

Quarterbacks

Running backs

Defense

Defensive ends

Defensive tackles

Middle guards

Linebackers

Defensive backs

Special teams

Kickers

  • Steve Mike-Meyer, Maryland (TSN, Time)
  • Dave Lawson, Air Force (FWAA)

Punters

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Football Award Winners" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). 2016. p. 10. Retrieved October 21, 2017.
  2. ^ a b "Griffin, Davis Head Coaches' All-America". Valley Morning Star (TX). November 29, 1974. p. B5.
  3. ^ a b "USC Star All-America 3rd Time; 3 SWC Players Named On Defense". The Corpus Christi Times. December 6, 1974. p. 10B.
  4. ^ a b Ted Gangi (ed.). "FWAA All-America Since 1944: The All-Time Team" (PDF). Retrieved February 8, 2015.
  5. ^ a b "UPI All-America Football Team". The Indianapolis Star. December 5, 1974. p. 80.
  6. ^ a b "4 Sooners Make Football News All-American". The Indianapolis Star. December 2, 1974. p. 26.
  7. ^ a b "1974 NEA All-America". Delaware County Daily Times. December 6, 1974. p. 22.
  8. ^ a b "Sporting News Tabs Humm All-American". The Lincoln Star (Nebraska). December 11, 1974. p. 57.
  9. ^ a b "Time Magazine Picks All-America Players". The Naples Daily News. December 9, 1974. p. 4C.
  10. ^ This column lists the number of selectors choosing the player as a first-team All-American as follows: official selectors/other selectors/total selectors.
1974 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1974 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1974 NCAA Division I football season. The selectors for the 1974 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1974 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1974 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1974 Big Ten Conference football season. The teams selected by the Big Ten coaches for the United Press International (UPI) were led by Ohio State with nine first-team selections. Michigan placed five players on the coaches' All-Big Ten first team. Running back Archie Griffin, who won his first Heisman Trophy in 1974, was the only player unanimously selected by the coaches as a first-team All-Big Ten player.

1974 All-Pacific-8 Conference football team

The 1974 All-Pacific-8 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific-8 Conference teams for the 1974 NCAA Division I football season.

1974 All-SEC football team

The 1974 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1974 NCAA Division I football season. Alabama won the conference.

1974 Army Cadets football team

The 1974 Army Cadets football team represented the United States Military Academy in the 1974 NCAA Division I football season. In their first year under head coach Homer Smith, the Cadets compiled a 3–8 record and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 306 to 156. In the annual Army–Navy Game, the Cadets lost to the Midshipmen by a 19 to 0 score.No Army players were selected as first-team players on the 1974 College Football All-America Team.

1974 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1974 Big Ten Conference football season was the 79th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1974 NCAA Division I football season.

The 1974 Michigan Wolverines football team, under head coach Bo Schembechler, compiled a 10–1 record, tied for the Big Ten championship, led the conference in scoring defense (6.8 points allowed per game), and was ranked No. 3 in final AP Poll. Cornerback Dave Brown was selected a consensus first-team All-American for the second straight year. Gordon Bell led the team with 1,048 rushing yards and 11 touchdowns. Quarterback Dennis Franklin finished sixth in the voting for the Heisman Trophy.

The 1974 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, under head coach Woody Hayes, compiled a 10–2 record, tied with Michigan for the Big Ten championship, led the conference in scoring offense (36.4 points per game), and was ranked No. 4 in the final AP Poll. The Buckeyes lost to USC, 18–17, in the 1975 Rose Bowl. Running back Archie Griffin totaled 1,695 rushing yards and won the 1974 Heisman Trophy as the best player in college football. Three Buckeyes, Griffin, Kurt Schumacher, and Steve Myers, were selected as consensus first-team All-Americans.

The 1974 Michigan State Spartans football team, under head coach Denny Stolz, compiled a 7–3–1 record, finished in third place in the Big Ten, and was ranked No. 12 in the final AP Poll. Quarterback Charley Baggett was selected as the team's most valuable player.

1974 NCAA Division I football season

The 1974 NCAA Division I football season finished with two national champions. The Associated Press (AP) writers' poll ranked the University of Oklahoma, which was on probation and barred by the NCAA from postseason play, #1 at season's end. The United Press International (UPI) coaches' poll did not rank teams on probation, by unanimous agreement of the 25 member coaches' board. The UPI trophy went to the University of Southern California (USC).

During the 20th century, the NCAA had no playoff for the major college football teams, later known as "Division I-A". The NCAA Football Guide, however, did note an "unofficial national champion" based on the top ranked teams in the "wire service" (AP and UPI) polls. The "writers' poll" by Associated Press (AP) was the most popular, followed by the "coaches' poll" by United Press International) (UPI). Starting in 1974, the UPI joined AP in issuing its final poll after the bowl games were completed. Both polls operated under a point system of 20 points for first place, 19 for second, etc., whereby the overall ranking was determined. The AP poll consisted of the votes of 60 writers, though not all voted in each poll, and the UPI poll was taken of a 25-member board.

Burton Lawless

Richard Burton Lawless (born November 1, 1953) is an American former football offensive guard in the National Football League (NFL) for the Dallas Cowboys and Detroit Lions. He played college football at the University of Florida, and earned All-American honors. He was drafted in the second round of the 1975 NFL Draft.

Dave Brown (cornerback)

David Steven "Dave" Brown (January 16, 1953 – January 10, 2006) was an American football player and coach.

Brown played 15 seasons in the National Football League (NFL) at the cornerback position for the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1975, the Seattle Seahawks from 1976 to 1986 and the Green Bay Packers from 1987 to 1989. He was selected as a second-team All-NFL player in 1984 and a second-team All-AFC player in 1985. His 62 career interceptions ranks ninth in NFL history, and his 50 interceptions with the Seahawks remains a club record.

Brown also played college football as a safety and punt returner for the University of Michigan from 1972 to 1974. While playing for Michigan, compiled 526 punt return yards (11.7 yards per return), three punt returns for touchdowns, 174 tackles, nine interceptions, 202 interception return yards, and 15 pass breakups. He was selected as a consensus first-team defensive back on the 1973 College Football All-America Team and a unanimous first-team pick on the 1974 College Football All-America Team. He was posthumously inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2007.

In his later years, Brown pursued a career in coaching. He was the defensive backs coach for the Seattle Seahawks from 1992 to 1998 and for the Texas Tech Red Raiders football team from 2001 until his death in January 2006.

John Provost

John S. Provost (born February 9, 1953) is a former American football player. He played college football at the defensive back position for College of the Holy Cross and was a consensus first-team selection to the 1974 College Football All-America Team. That same year, he was also selected by the United Press as the New England Major College Player of the Year and by the New England College Coaches as the most outstanding football player in New England. He totaled 10 interceptions in 1974 and 27 in his career and set a career NCAA record with 470 interception return yards. In 1974, he had punt returns of 85 and 59 yards and intercepted four passes in Holy Cross's game against Brown. Provost was inducted into the Holy Cross Crusader Football Legends Ring of Fame in 2010.

John Roush (American football)

John Roush (born January 7, 1953) is a former American football player. He attended the University of Oklahoma and played at the offensive guard position for the Oklahoma Sooners football team and was a member of the 1974 team coached by Barry Switzer that compiled an 11–0 record and won the national championship. He was also a consensus first-team selection to the 1974 College Football All-America Team. He was also an Academic All-America selection in 1974.

Ralph Ortega

Ralph Ortega (born July 6, 1953) is an American former college and professional football player who was a linebacker in the National Football League (NFL) for six seasons during the 1970s and early 1980s. Ortega played college football for the University of Florida, and received All-American honors. A second-round pick in the 1975 NFL Draft, he played professionally for the Atlanta Falcons and Miami Dolphins of the NFL.

1974 College Football All-America Team consensus selections
Offense
Defense

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