1974–75 FA Cup

The 1974–75 FA Cup was the 94th season of the world's oldest football cup competition, the Football Association Challenge Cup, commonly known as the FA Cup. West Ham United won the competition, beating Second Division side Fulham 2–0 in the final at Wembley, London.

Matches were scheduled to be played at the stadium of the team named first on the date specified for each round, which was always a Saturday. If scores were level after 90 minutes had been played, a replay would take place at the stadium of the second-named team later the same week. If the replayed match was drawn further replays would be held until a winner was determined. If scores were level after 90 minutes had been played in a replay, a 30-minute period of extra time would be played.

1974–75 FA Cup
Country England
 Wales
Defending championsLiverpool
ChampionsWest Ham United
(2nd title)
Runners-upFulham

Calendar

Round Date
Preliminary round Saturday, 31 August 1974
First qualifying round Saturday, 14 September 1974
Second qualifying round Saturday, 5 October 1974
Third qualifying round Saturday, 19 October 1974
Fourth qualifying round Saturday, 2 November 1974
First round proper Saturday, 23 November 1974
Second round proper Saturday, 14 December 1974
Third round proper Saturday, 4 January 1975
Fourth round proper Saturday, 25 January 1975
Fifth round proper Saturday, 15 February 1975
Sixth round proper Saturday, 8 March 1975
Semi-finals Saturday, 5 April 1975
Final Saturday, 3 May 1975

Results

First round proper

At this stage clubs from the Football League Third and Fourth Divisions joined those non-league clubs having come through the qualifying rounds. Matches were scheduled to be played on Saturday, 23 November 1974. Twelve matches were drawn, of which one required a second replay.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date Attendance Notes
1 Ashford Town (Kent) 1–3 Walsall 27 November 1974 2,700 [1]
2 Chesterfield 3–1 Boston United 23 November 1974 6,314 [2]
3 Darlington 1–0 Workington 23 November 1974
4 Dartford 2–3 Plymouth Argyle 23 November 1974 4,384 [3]
5 Hartlepool 1–0 Bradford City 23 November 1974 3,677 [4]
6 A.F.C. Bournemouth 5–0 Southwick 23 November 1974
7 Bury 4–2 Southport 23 November 1974
8 Farsley Celtic 0–2 Tranmere Rovers 23 November 1974 [F]
9 Rochdale 0–0 Marine 23 November 1974
Replay Marine 1–2 Rochdale 27 November 1974 2,540 [1]
10 Watford 0–1 Colchester United 23 November 1974
11 Grimsby Town 1–0 Huddersfield Town 23 November 1974
12 Crewe Alexandra 2–2 Gateshead United 23 November 1974
Replay Gateshead United 1–0 Crewe Alexandra 25 November 1974 6,000 [1]
13 Swindon Town 4–0 Reading 23 November 1974 13,365 [5]
14 Shrewsbury Town 1–1 Wigan Athletic 23 November 1974
Replay Wigan Athletic 2–1 Shrewsbury Town 25 November 1974 11,860 [1]
15 Bishop Auckland 5–0 Morecambe 23 November 1974
16 Stockport County 0–0 Stafford Rangers 23 November 1974
Replay Stafford Rangers 1–0 Stockport County 26 November 1974 5,630 [1]
17 Wycombe Wanderers 3–1 Cheltenham Town 23 November 1974
18 Barnsley 1–2 Halifax Town 23 November 1974
19 Brighton & Hove Albion 3–1 Aldershot 23 November 1974
20 Hitchin Town 0–0 Cambridge United 23 November 1974
Replay Cambridge United 3–0 Hitchin Town 26 November 1974 2,827 [1]
21 Wimbledon 1–0 Bath City 23 November 1974
22 Exeter City 1–2 Newport County 23 November 1974
23 Scunthorpe United 1–1 Altrincham 23 November 1974
Replay Altrincham 3–1 Scunthorpe United 25 November 1974
24 Blyth Spartans 1–1 Preston North End 23 November 1974 8,500 [1]
Replay Preston North End 5–1 Blyth Spartans 26 November 1974 10,101 [1]
25 Mansfield Town 3–1 Wrexham 23 November 1974
26 Port Vale 2–2 Lincoln City 23 November 1974
Replay Lincoln City 2–0 Port Vale 27 November 1974 6,824 [1]
27 Matlock Town 1–4 Blackburn Rovers 23 November 1974
28 Oswestry Town 1–3 Doncaster Rovers 23 November 1974
29 Torquay United 0–1 Northampton Town 23 November 1974
30 Hereford United 1–0 Gillingham 26 November 1974 7,362 [1]
31 Bishop's Stortford 0–0 Leatherhead 23 November 1974
Replay Leatherhead 2–0 Bishop's Stortford 26 November 1974 1,775 [1]
32 Rotherham United 1–0 Chester 23 November 1974
33 Romford 0–2 Ilford 23 November 1974
34 Tooting & Mitcham United 1–2 Crystal Palace 27 November 1974 10,000 [1]
35 Peterborough United 0–0 Weymouth 23 November 1974 8,984 [6]
Replay Weymouth 3–3 Peterborough United 4 December 1974 4,009 [6]
2nd replay Peterborough United 3–0 Weymouth 9 December 1974 9,077 [G][6]
36 Chelmsford City 0–1 Charlton Athletic 23 November 1974
37 Nuneaton Borough 2–2 Maidstone United 23 November 1974
Replay Maidstone United 2–0 Nuneaton Borough 26 November 1974 4,101 [1]
38 Slough Town 1–4 Brentford 23 November 1974
39 Swansea City 1–1 Kettering Town 26 November 1974 3,175 [1]
Replay Kettering Town 3–1 Swansea City 2 December 1974 5,973 [1]
40 AP Leamington 1–2 Southend United 23 November 1974 3,000 [7]

Second round proper

The matches were scheduled for Saturday, 14 December 1974. Five matches were drawn, with replays taking place later the same week.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date Attendance Notes
1 Chesterfield 1–0 Doncaster Rovers 14 December 1974 5,267 [2]
2 Hartlepool 0–0 Lincoln City 14 December 1974 2,838 [4]
Replay Lincoln City 1–0 Hartlepool 17 December 1974 4,985 [4]
3 Rochdale 1–1 Tranmere Rovers 14 December 1974
Replay Tranmere Rovers 1–0 Rochdale 16 December 1974 3,244 [1]
4 Blackburn Rovers 1–0 Darlington 14 December 1974
5 Grimsby Town 1–1 Bury 14 December 1974
Replay Bury 2–1 Grimsby Town 17 December 1974
6 Stafford Rangers 2–1 Halifax Town 14 December 1974
7 Swindon Town 3–1 Maidstone United 14 December 1974 10,016 [5]
8 Bishop Auckland 0–2 Preston North End 14 December 1974
9 Ilford 0–2 Southend United 14 December 1974 3,486 [7]
10 Wycombe Wanderers 0–0 A.F.C. Bournemouth 14 December 1974
Replay A.F.C. Bournemouth 1–2 Wycombe Wanderers 18 December 1974 5,407 [1]
11 Brighton & Hove Albion 1–0 Brentford 14 December 1974
12 Plymouth Argyle 2–1 Crystal Palace 14 December 1974 17,473 [3]
13 Wimbledon 2–0 Kettering Town 14 December 1974
14 Altrincham 3–0 Gateshead United 14 December 1974
15 Newport County 1–3 Walsall 14 December 1974
16 Rotherham United 2–1 Northampton Town 14 December 1974
17 Wigan Athletic 1–1 Mansfield Town 14 December 1974
Replay Mansfield Town 3–1 Wigan Athletic 16 December 1974 11,249 [1]
18 Peterborough United 3–0 Charlton Athletic 14 December 1974 9,642 [6]
19 Leatherhead 1–0 Colchester United 14 December 1974
20 Cambridge United 2–0 Hereford United 14 December 1974

Third round proper

The 44 First and Second Division clubs entered the competition at this stage. The matches were scheduled Saturday, 4 January 1975. Eleven matches were drawn, of which two required second replays.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date Attendance Notes
1 Burnley 0–1 Wimbledon 4 January 1975
2 Bury 2–2 Millwall 4 January 1975
Replay Millwall 1–1 Bury 7 January 1975 10,274 [1]
2nd replay Bury 2–0 Millwall 13 January 1975 4,000 [D][1]
3 Liverpool 2–0 Stoke City 4 January 1975 48,723 [8]
4 Preston North End 0–1 Carlisle United 4 January 1975
5 Southampton 1–2 West Ham United 4 January 1975 24,615 [9]
6 Leicester City 3–1 Oxford United 4 January 1975
7 Notts County 3–1 Portsmouth 3 January 1975 14,723 [10]
8 Nottingham Forest 1–1 Tottenham Hotspur 4 January 1975 23,355
Replay Tottenham Hotspur 0–1 Nottingham Forest 8 January 1975 27,996 [11]
9 Blackburn Rovers 1–2 Bristol Rovers 4 January 1975
10 Bolton Wanderers 0–0 West Bromwich Albion 4 January 1975
Replay West Bromwich Albion 4–0 Bolton Wanderers 8 January 1975 21,210 [1]
11 Wolverhampton Wanderers 1–2 Ipswich Town 4 January 1975 28,542 [12]
12 Sunderland 2–0 Chesterfield 4 January 1975 34,268 [13]
13 Stafford Rangers 0–0 Rotherham United 4 January 1975 8,000 [1]
Replay Rotherham United 0–2 Stafford Rangers 7 January 1975 11,262 [1]
14 Luton Town 0–1 Birmingham City 4 January 1975 17,543 [14]
15 Everton 1–1 Altrincham 4 January 1975 34,519 [15]
Replay Altrincham 0–2 Everton 7 January 1975 35,530 [E][15]
16 Swindon Town 2–0 Lincoln City 4 January 1975 11,971 [5]
17 Sheffield United 2–0 Bristol City 4 January 1975
18 Wycombe Wanderers 0–0 Middlesbrough 4 January 1975 12,000
Replay Middlesbrough 1–0 Wycombe Wanderers 7 January 1975 30,128 [1]
19 Manchester City 0–2 Newcastle United 4 January 1975 37,625 [16]
20 Fulham 1–1 Hull City 4 January 1975 8,897
Replay Hull City 2–2 Fulham 7 January 1975 11,850 [1]
2nd replay Fulham 1–0 Hull City 13 January 1975 4,929 [B][1]
21 Coventry City 2–0 Norwich City 4 January 1975
22 Brighton & Hove Albion 0–1 Leatherhead 4 January 1975
23 Manchester United 0–0 Walsall 4 January 1975 43,353 [17]
Replay Walsall 3–2 Manchester United 7 January 1975 18,105 [17]
24 Plymouth Argyle 2–0 Blackpool 4 January 1975 23,143 [3]
25 Oldham Athletic 0–3 Aston Villa 4 January 1975
26 Chelsea 3–2 Sheffield Wednesday 4 January 1975 24,679 [18]
27 Southend United 2–2 Queens Park Rangers 4 January 1975 18,100 [1]
Replay Queens Park Rangers 2–0 Southend United 7 January 1975 21,484 [1]
28 Mansfield Town 1–0 Cambridge United 4 January 1975
29 Arsenal 1–1 York City 4 January 1975
Replay York City 1–3 Arsenal 7 January 1975 15,362 [1]
30 Leeds United 4–1 Cardiff City 4 January 1975 31,572 [19]
31 Peterborough United 1–0 Tranmere Rovers 4 January 1975 9,942 [6]
32 Orient 2–2 Derby County 4 January 1975 12,490 [20]
Replay Derby County 2–1 Orient 8 January 1975 26,501 [21]

Fourth round proper

The matches were scheduled for Saturday, 25 January 1975. Four matches were drawn, of which one, the tie between Fulham and Nottingham Forest, required three replays.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date Attendance Notes
1 Bury 1–2 Mansfield Town 25 January 1975
2 Walsall 1–0 Newcastle United 25 January 1975 19,998 [16]
3 Leatherhead 2–3 Leicester City 25 January 1975 32,000 [B][1]
4 Aston Villa 4–1 Sheffield United 25 January 1975
5 Middlesbrough 3–1 Sunderland 25 January 1975 39,400 [13]
6 Derby County 2–0 Bristol Rovers 27 January 1975 27,980 [22]
7 Stafford Rangers 1–2 Peterborough United 25 January 1975 31,160 [A][6]
8 Ipswich Town 1–0 Liverpool 25 January 1975 34,709 [12]
9 Queens Park Rangers 3–0 Notts County 24 January 1975 23,428 [10]
10 Fulham 0–0 Nottingham Forest 28 January 1975 14,846 [1]
Replay Nottingham Forest 1–1 Fulham 3 February 1975 25,361 [1]
2nd replay Fulham 1–1 Nottingham Forest 5 February 1975 11,920 [1]
3rd replay Nottingham Forest 1–2 Fulham 10 February 1975 23,240 [1]
11 Coventry City 1–1 Arsenal 25 January 1975
Replay Arsenal 3–0 Coventry City 29 January 1975 30,867 [1]
12 West Ham United 1–1 Swindon Town 25 January 1975 35,679 [9]
Replay Swindon Town 1–2 West Ham United 28 January 1975 27,749 [9]
13 Plymouth Argyle 1–3 Everton 25 January 1975 38,000 [15]
14 Carlisle United 3–2 West Bromwich Albion 25 January 1975
15 Chelsea 0–1 Birmingham City 25 January 1975 36,650 [14]
16 Leeds United 0–0 Wimbledon 25 January 1975 46,230 [19]
Replay Wimbledon 0–1 Leeds United 10 February 1975 45,071 [C][19]

Fifth round proper

The matches were scheduled for Saturday, 15 February 1975. Two matches were drawn, of which one required a second replay.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date Attendance Notes
1 Derby County 0–1 Leeds United 18 February 1975 35,298 [23]
2 Everton 1–2 Fulham 15 February 1975 45,233 [15]
3 Ipswich Town 3–2 Aston Villa 15 February 1975 31,297 [12]
4 West Ham United 2–1 Queens Park Rangers 15 February 1975 39,193 [9]
5 Mansfield Town 0–1 Carlisle United 15 February 1975
6 Arsenal 0–0 Leicester City 15 February 1975
Replay Leicester City 1–1 Arsenal 19 February 1975 35,000 [1]
2nd replay Leicester City 0–1 Arsenal 24 February 1975 39,025 [1]
7 Peterborough United 1–1 Middlesbrough 15 February 1975 25,750 [6]
Replay Middlesbrough 2–0 Peterborough United 18 February 1975 34,303 [6]
8 Birmingham City 2–1 Walsall 15 February 1975 45,881 [14]

Sixth round proper

Ipswich Town0–0Leeds United
Carlisle United0–1Fulham
Barrett Goal
Arsenal0–2West Ham United
Taylor Goal Goal
Birmingham City1–0Middlesbrough
Hatton Goal
Replay
Leeds United1–1Ipswich Town
McKenzie Goal 90' Johnson Goal 17'
Second replay
Ipswich Town0–0Leeds United
Third replay
Leeds United2–3Ipswich Town
Clarke Goal
Giles Goal
Hamilton Goal
Whymark Goal
Woods Goal

Semi-finals

Fulham1–1Birmingham City
Mitchell Goal 50' Gallagher Goal
West Ham United0–0Ipswich Town
Replays
Birmingham City0 – 1
a.e.t
Fulham
Mitchell Goal 120'
Ipswich Town1–2West Ham United
Jennings Goal 1' (o.g.) Taylor Goal Goal

Final

The final took place on Saturday, 3 May 1975 at Wembley and ended in a victory for West Ham United over Fulham by 2–0. Both goals were scored by Alan Taylor. The attendance was 100,000.

West Ham United2–0Fulham
A. Taylor Goal 60' Goal 64' [24]
West Ham
Fulham

TV coverage

The right to show FA Cup games were, as with Football League matches, shared between the BBC and ITV network. All games were shown in a highlights format, except the Final, which was shown live both on BBC1 & ITV. The BBC football highlights programme Match Of The Day would show up to three games and the various ITV regional network stations would cover up to one game and show highlights from other games covered elsewhere on the ITV network. No games from rounds 1 or 2 were shown. Highlights of replays would be shown on either the BBC or ITV. Third round BBC Orient v Derby County, Liverpool v Stoke City, Southampton v West Ham United ITV Wycombe Wanderers v Middlesbrough (LWT), Manchester City v Newcastle United (Granada & Tyne-Tees), Wolverhampton Wanderers v Ipswich Town (ATV), Southend United v Queens Park Rangers (Anglia), Leeds United v Cardiff City (Yorkshire), Brighton & Hove Albion v Leatherhead (Southern), Derby County v Orient (Midweek replay All Regions). Fourth round BBC Leatherhead v Leicester City, Plymouth Argyle v Everton, Middlesbrough v Sunderland, Arsenal v Coventry (Midweek replay), Wimbledon v Leeds United (Monday night replay) ITV Ipswich Town v Liverpool (Anglia & Granada), West Ham United v Swindon Town (LWT & HTV), Coventry City v Arsenal (ATV), Leeds United v Wimbledon (Yorkshire). Fifth round BBC Peterborough United v Middlesbrough, Arsenal v Leicester City, Mansfield Town v Carlisle United ITV West Ham United v Queens Park Rangers (LWT), Everton v Fulham (Granada),Ipswich Town v Aston Villa (Anglia), Birmingham City v Walsall (ATV), Derby County v Leeds United (Midweek All regions), Leicester City v Arsenal (Midweek 2nd replay All regions), Sixth round BBC Arsenal v West Ham United, Birmingham City v Middlesbrough ITV Carlisle United (Granada, LWT & Tyne-Tees), Ipswich Town v Leeds United (Anglia & Yorkshire), Leeds United v Ipswich Town (Midweek 2nd replay All regions) Semi-Finals BBC Ipswich Town v West Ham United ITV Birmingham City v Fulham (All regions). Note neither BBC or ITV covered the replay's, the goals were only shown as clips for TV news reports, with commentary over dubbed later. Final Fulham v West Ham United Shown live on both BBC & ITV

Notes

A. ^ : Match played at Victoria Ground, Stoke-on-Trent.
B. a b : Match played at Filbert Street, Leicester.
C. ^ : Match played at Selhurst Park, London.
D. ^ : Match played at The Hawthorns, West Bromwich.
E. ^ : Match played at Old Trafford, Manchester.
F. ^ : Match played at Elland Road, Leeds.
G. ^ : Match played at London Road, Peterborough.

References

General
Specific
  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak Attendance figure from The Times, via The Times Digital Archive 1785–1985.
  2. ^ a b end of season official match programme
  3. ^ a b c "FA Cup Results 1974–75". Greens on Screen. Archived from the original on 2 October 2011. Retrieved 23 May 2008.
  4. ^ a b c "1974/75 First Team Results". In The Mad Crowd. John Phillips. Archived from the original on 1 October 2011. Retrieved 23 May 2008.
  5. ^ a b c "Season 1974–1975". Swindon-Town-FC.co.uk. Archived from the original on 15 April 2008. Retrieved 23 May 2008.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h "1974/75". UpThePosh! The Peterborough United Database. Chris Wilkinson. Retrieved 23 May 2008.
  7. ^ a b "Season 1974–75". Southend United database. Retrieved 26 May 2008.
  8. ^ "All the official games for the 1974–1975 season". lfchistory.net. Retrieved 23 May 2008.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g "1st Division 1974–75". westhamstats.info. Archived from the original on 14 May 2008. Retrieved 23 May 2008.
  10. ^ a b "1974/75". Up The Maggies. Archived from the original on 25 July 2008. Retrieved 23 May 2008.
  11. ^ "Season 1974–1975". Topspurs. Jim Duggan. Retrieved 23 May 2008.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Season: 1974–75 Division 1". Pride of Anglia. Retrieved 23 May 2008.
  13. ^ a b "Season details 1974–75". TheStatCat. Archived from the original on 27 May 2008. Retrieved 23 May 2008.
  14. ^ a b c d e f Matthews, Tony (1995). Birmingham City: A Complete Record. Derby: Breedon Books. p. 210. ISBN 978-1-85983-010-9.
  15. ^ a b c d "Everton Season Stats 1974–1975". Everton F.C. Retrieved 23 May 2008.
  16. ^ a b "Match by Match in FA Cup". Newcastle United a statistical journey... K. H. Scott. Archived from the original on 7 April 2014. Retrieved 23 May 2008.
  17. ^ a b "Season 1974–1975". stretfordend.co.uk. Retrieved 23 May 2008.
  18. ^ "Season 1974–1975". The Sheffield Wednesday Archive. Adrian Bullock. Retrieved 23 May 2008.
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  20. ^ Mortimer, Gerald. "Orient 2 v 2 Derby County FA Cup". Derby Evening Telegraph. Northcliffe Media. Retrieved 31 December 2008.
  21. ^ Mortimer, Gerald. "Derby County 2 v 1 Orient FA Cup". Derby Evening Telegraph. Northcliffe Media. Retrieved 31 December 2008.
  22. ^ Mortimer, Gerald. "Derby County 2 v 0 Bristol Rovers FA Cup". Derby Evening Telegraph. Northcliffe Media. Retrieved 31 December 2008.
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  24. ^ "FA Cup Final 1975". fa-cupfinals.co.uk. Archived from the original on 8 June 2008. Retrieved 23 May 2008.
1974 FA Charity Shield

The 1974 FA Charity Shield was the 52nd FA Charity Shield, an annual English association football match played between the winners of the previous season's Football League First Division and FA Cup. The match was contested by Leeds United, the champions of the 1973–74 Football League First Division, and Liverpool, the 1973–74 FA Cup winners. It was held at Wembley Stadium on 10 August 1974. Watched by a crowd of 67,000 and televised (although not live as has often been claimed), the match ended in a 1–1 draw and was decided by a penalty shoot-out which was won 6–5 by Liverpool.The game was the first in which Bob Paisley and Brian Clough managed Liverpool and Leeds respectively. In recognition of his services to the club, Liverpool asked their retired manager Bill Shankly to lead the team out onto the field.

The match is mostly remembered for Billy Bremner and Kevin Keegan being jointly dismissed from the field by referee Bob Matthewson in the 60th minute after they had a fight. Keegan, who claimed provocation, was furious about being sent off and threw his shirt away. Bremner copied him and the two players were afterwards charged with bringing football into disrepute. The FA Disciplinary Committee imposed tough punishments but were themselves heavily criticised by people in football who doubted their competence.

1974–75 Birmingham City F.C. season

The 1974–75 Football League season was Birmingham City Football Club's 72nd in the Football League and their 41st in the First Division. They finished in 17th position in the 22-team division, four points above the relegation positions. They entered the 1974–75 FA Cup at the third round proper and lost to Fulham in the last minute of the semi-final replay, lost to Crewe Alexandra in their opening match of the League Cup in the second round, and reached the semi-final of the Texaco Cup.

Twenty-eight players made at least one appearance in nationally organised first-team competition, and there were thirteen different goalscorers. Goalkeeper Dave Latchford and forward Bob Hatton played in 53 of the 56 first-team matches over the season, and the leading goalscorer was Hatton with 18 goals, of which 14 came in league competition.

1974–75 FA Cup qualifying rounds

The FA Cup 1974–75 is the 94th season of the world's oldest football knockout competition; The Football Association Challenge Cup, or FA Cup for short. The large number of clubs entering the tournament from lower down the English football league system meant that the competition started with a number of preliminary and qualifying rounds. The 30 victorious teams from the Fourth Round Qualifying progressed to the First Round Proper.

1974–75 York City F.C. season

The 1974–75 season was the 53rd season of competitive association football and 46th season in the Football League played by York City Football Club, a professional football club based in York, North Yorkshire, England. They finished in fifteenth position in the 22-team 1974–75 Football League Second Division. They entered the 1974–75 FA Cup in the third round and lost to Arsenal, and entered the 1974–75 League Cup in the first round and lost to Huddersfield Town.

22 players made at least one appearance in nationally organised first-team competition, and there were 11 different goalscorers. Goalkeeper Graeme Crawford, defender Chris Topping and midfielder Ian Holmes played in all 45 first-team matches over the season. Jimmy Seal finished as leading goalscorer with 18 goals, of which 17 came in league competition and one came in the FA Cup.

1975 FA Charity Shield

The 1975 FA Charity Shield was the 53rd FA Charity Shield, an annual football match played between the winners of the previous season's First Division and FA Cup competitions. The match was played on 9 August 1975 at Wembley Stadium and contested by Derby County, who had won the 1974–75 First Division, and West Ham United, who had won the 1974–75 FA Cup. Derby County won the match by 2–0.

1975 FA Cup Final

The 1975 FA Cup Final was the 94th final of the FA Cup. It took place on 3 May 1975 at Wembley Stadium and was contested by London clubs West Ham United and Fulham. The Fulham team contained two former England captains in former West Ham captain Bobby Moore, making his last appearance at Wembley, and Alan Mullery.

West Ham won 2–0, with both goals scored by Alan Taylor. The first came in the 60th minute when Fulham goalkeeper Peter Mellor parried Billy Jennings' shot into Taylor's path; the second came four minutes later when Taylor capitalised after Mellor failed to hold on to Graham Paddon's shot.The 1975 West Ham team remains the last all-English team to win the FA Cup. It also remains the only occasion that Fulham have appeared in an FA Cup final, and it was their last major final for 35 years, until the 2010 UEFA Europa League Final.

Alan Taylor (footballer, born 1953)

Alan David Taylor (born 14 November 1953) is an English former professional footballer best known for his goalscoring exploits with West Ham United in their FA Cup success of 1975, culminating in two goals in that season's final.

Arthur Albiston

Arthur Richard Albiston (born 14 July 1957 in Edinburgh) is a Scottish former football player. Albiston played for Manchester United for most of his career, making almost 500 appearances for the club. He also made 14 international appearances for Scotland and was selected for their 1986 FIFA World Cup squad.

Dietmar Bruck

Dietmar Bruck (born 19 April 1944) is a former professional footballer who played in the Football League as a full back for Coventry City, where he spent the majority of his career, Charlton Athletic and Northampton Town.

Graham Paddon

Graham Charles Paddon (24 August 1950 – 19 November 2007) was an English footballer who played as a midfielder for Coventry City, Millwall, Norwich City and West Ham United.

John Wark

John Wark (born 4 August 1957) is a Scottish former footballer who spent most of his playing time with Ipswich Town. He won a record four Player of the Year awards before becoming one of the four inaugural members of the club's Hall of Fame. Wark had long spells at the club, which bookended his career, and a third, brief interlude dividing his briefer periods at Liverpool and Middlesbrough. A versatile player, Wark played most of his professional games as a midfielder, although he sometimes played as a central defender and on occasion as a striker.

Born in Glasgow, Wark represented Scotland in international football, winning 29 caps and scoring seven goals. This included selection for Scotland in the 1982 FIFA World Cup in which he made three appearances and scored twice.

During his playing career, Wark appeared in the film Escape to Victory. Since retiring as a professional player in 1996, he has continued to work for Ipswich Town—since September 2008 in the corporate hospitality department. His autobiography, Wark On, was published in 2009.

Kevin Beattie

Thomas Kevin Beattie (18 December 1953 – 16 September 2018) was an English footballer. Born into poverty, he played at both professional and international levels, mostly as a centre-half. He spent the majority of his playing career at Ipswich Town, with whom he won both the FA Cup and the UEFA Cup. He was also named the inaugural Professional Footballers' Association Young Player of the Year at the end of the 1972–73 season and featured in the film Escape to Victory alongside many of his Ipswich teammates.

Beattie's playing career took him from rags to riches, but according to The Daily Telegraph he was "cursed by being both injury and accident prone". His playing career included some controversy, notably when he went missing when selected for England's under-23 team. After retiring from playing, he descended into unemployment, alcohol abuse and contemplated suicide before finding purpose once more and a new career in later life, as a football commentator on television and radio.

Beattie has been called Ipswich Town's best ever player by many pundits and polls. Former Ipswich (and later England) manager Bobby Robson called him the best England player he had seen.

Lou Macari

Luigi "Lou" Macari (born 7 June 1949) is a Scottish former footballer and manager. He began his playing career at Celtic where he was one of the Quality Street Gang, the outstanding reserve team that emerged in the late 1960s that also included Kenny Dalglish and Danny McGrain. He is best known for his time at Manchester United, where he played over 400 games. He helped them win promotion back to the First Division and then played in their FA Cup win of 1977. He then finished his playing career at Swindon Town.

He was the manager of Swindon, West Ham United, Birmingham City, Stoke City (two spells), Celtic and Huddersfield Town.

Manchester United F.C.

Manchester United Football Club is a professional football club based in Old Trafford, Greater Manchester, England, that competes in the Premier League, the top flight of English football. Nicknamed "the Red Devils", the club was founded as Newton Heath LYR Football Club in 1878, changed its name to Manchester United in 1902 and moved to its current stadium, Old Trafford, in 1910.

Manchester United have won more trophies than any other club in English football, with a record 20 League titles, 12 FA Cups, 5 League Cups and a record 21 FA Community Shields. United have also won 3 UEFA Champions Leagues, 1 UEFA Europa League, 1 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup, 1 UEFA Super Cup, 1 Intercontinental Cup and 1 FIFA Club World Cup. In 1998–99, the club became the first in the history of English football to achieve the continental European treble. By winning the UEFA Europa League in 2016–17, they became one of five clubs to have won all three main UEFA club competitions.

The 1958 Munich air disaster claimed the lives of eight players. In 1968, under the management of Matt Busby, Manchester United became the first English football club to win the European Cup. Alex Ferguson won 38 trophies as manager, including 13 Premier League titles, 5 FA Cups and 2 UEFA Champions Leagues, between 1986 and 2013, when he announced his retirement.

Manchester United was the highest-earning football club in the world for 2016–17, with an annual revenue of €676.3 million, and the world's most valuable football club in 2018, valued at £3.1 billion. As of June 2015, it is the world's most valuable football brand, estimated to be worth $1.2 billion. After being floated on the London Stock Exchange in 1991, the club was purchased by Malcolm Glazer in May 2005 in a deal valuing the club at almost £800 million, after which the company was taken private again, before going public once more in August 2012, when they made an initial public offering on the New York Stock Exchange. Manchester United is one of the most widely supported football clubs in the world, and has rivalries with Liverpool, Manchester City, Arsenal and Leeds United.

Rotherham United F.C.

Rotherham United Football Club, nicknamed The Millers, is a professional association football club based in Rotherham, South Yorkshire, England. It competes in League One, the third tier of the English football league system, following its relegation from the Championship in the 2018–19 season.

Founded in 1925 as a merger between Rotherham Town (1899) and Rotherham County (1870), the club's colours were initially yellow and black, but later evolved into the more traditional red and white. Rotherham United play their home games at New York Stadium, a 12,021 capacity all-seater stadium, having previously played since its foundation at Millmoor for 101 years. Joining the Football League back in 1925, Rotherham spent the first 25 years of their time in Division Three North, the lowest level of the Football League, finally gaining promotion to Division Two at the end of the 1950–51 season.The Millers featured in the inaugural League Cup final in 1961, and won the 1996 Football League Trophy and 1946 Football League North Cup. They also achieved two separate back to back promotions in 1999–2001 under Ronnie Moore and 2012–2014 under Steve Evans.

Sammy McIlroy

Samuel Baxter McIlroy (born 2 August 1954) is a former Northern Ireland international footballer who played for Manchester United, Stoke City, Manchester City, Örgryte (Sweden), Bury, VfB Mödling (Austria), Preston North End.After playing, he managed several English football teams and the Northern Ireland national team, gaining most success with Macclesfield Town. He was most recently the manager of Football League Two side Morecambe.

Skegness Town A.F.C.

Skegness Town Association Football Club is an English association football club based in the town of Skegness, Lincolnshire. The club currently competes in the Northern Counties East League Division One, after being promoted from the Lincolnshire League at the end of the 2017-18 season.

Skegness Town play at the Vertigo Stadium, Skegness after moving there from Burgh Road in 2017. The club's home kit is a white shirt, red shorts and white socks and the away kit is a yellow shirt, green shorts and yellow socks. At the end of the 2017-18 season, the club finished second in the Lincolnshire League

Skegness Town have won the Lincolnshire League seven times, as well as the Lincolnshire Junior County Cup in the 2016/17 season. On top of this, the club has also won the Lincolnshire Football League Cup twice, the Central Alliance South Division three times, the Lincolnshire FA Senior 'B' Cup four times and the Lincolnshire FA Senior 'A' Cup winners six times.

Stafford Rangers F.C.

Not to be confused with the Volunteer Regiment The Staffordshire Rangers or Stratford RangersStafford Rangers Football Club is a semi-professional English football team from Stafford which plays in the Northern Premier League Premier Division.

The team wear black and white stripes with black shorts. Stafford Rangers' rivals include Tamworth, Hednesford Town, Burton Albion, and Telford United.

Worthing United F.C.

Worthing United Football Club is a football club based in Worthing, England. They are currently members of the Southern Combination Division One and play at the Robert Albon Memorial Ground.

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