1973 Pro Bowl

The 1973 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 23rd annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1972 season. The game was played on Sunday, January 21, 1973, at Texas Stadium in Irving, Texas. It was the first Pro Bowl not to be played at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.The final score was AFC 33, NFC 28. O. J. Simpson of the Buffalo Bills was named the game's Most Valuable Player.[1]

Attendance at the game was 47,879.[2] Chuck Noll of the Pittsburgh Steelers coached the AFC while the NFC was led by the Dallas Cowboys' Tom Landry.[3] The game's referee was Dick Jorgensen.[2]

Players on the winning AFC team received $2,000 apiece while the NFC participants each took home $1,500.[4]

1973 NFL Pro Bowl
AFC NFC
33 28
Head coach:
Chuck Noll
(Pittsburgh Steelers)
Head coach:
Tom Landry
(Dallas Cowboys)
1234 Total
AFC 0101013 33
NFC 140014 28
DateJanuary 21, 1973
StadiumTexas Stadium, Irving, Texas
MVPO. J. Simpson (Buffalo Bills)
RefereeDick Jorgensen
Attendance47,879
TV in the United States
NetworkCBS
AnnouncersFrank Glieber, Alex Hawkins & Bruce Roberts

References

  1. ^ "AFC holds off NFC by 33–28". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. AP. January 22, 1973. p. 16. Retrieved January 18, 2012.
  2. ^ a b "1973 Pro Bowl game book" (PDF). NFL Game Statistics & Information. National Football League. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 30, 2012. Retrieved January 30, 2012.
  3. ^ "The 1973 Pro Bowl". Bolding Sports Research. Archived from the original on January 18, 2012. Retrieved January 18, 2012.
  4. ^ "NFL Pro Bowl history". CBSSports.com. Archived from the original on January 16, 2012. Retrieved January 31, 2012.

External links

1974 Pro Bowl

The 1974 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 24th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1973 season. The game was played on Sunday, January 20, 1974, at Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City, Missouri. The final score was AFC 15, NFC 13. The attendance for the game was 51,484 though nearly 70,000 tickets were sold.John Madden of the Oakland Raiders coached the AFC while the NFC was led by the Dallas Cowboys' Tom Landry.Kicker Garo Yepremian of the Miami Dolphins was the game's MVP. Yepremian set a Pro Bowl record which still stands as of 2018, kicking five field goals in the game. This was the last American football game to have the goal posts on the goal line, before being moved back to the endline the next year to make field goals harder for teams to make. The referee for the game was Jack Reader, who retired from on-field work after the Pro Bowl to accept a position as the NFL's Assistant Supervisor of Officials.Players on the winning AFC team each received $2,000 while the NFC participants took home $1,500.

Efren Herrera

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Garo Yepremian

Garabed Sarkis "Garo" Yepremian (June 2, 1944 – May 15, 2015) was an American football placekicker in the National Football League for the Detroit Lions, Miami Dolphins, New Orleans Saints, and Tampa Bay Buccaneers, during a career that spanned from 1966 to 1981.

John Zook

John Eldon Zook (born September 24, 1947 in Garden City, Kansas) is a former NFL player. He attended and played high school football at Larned, Kansas. He was a defensive end who played 12 seasons in the National Football League for the St. Louis Cardinals and the Atlanta Falcons. Zook played college football for the University of Kansas.

Zook was a three-year letterman, was picked twice for all-conference honors, anchoring one of the top defensive units ever taking the field at KU. He was an honorable mention All-American in 1967 and was a consensus All-America honors as the Jayhawks' defensive standout on the 1968 Orange Bowl-bound team, the year KU was named No. 6 by the Associated Press. Zook had 202 total tackles during his career, putting him at No. 4 on KU's all-time defensive line list. KU Coach Pepper Rodgers said Zook "never played but full speed from snap one to snap hundred. He was the most full-speed player on every snap that you could imagine." He was also chosen the KU All-Time team by the Lawrence Journal-World.Zook was drafted by the Los Angeles Rams in the 4th round (99th overall) of the 1969 NFL Draft. He was traded to the Philadelphia Eagles and then by the Eagles to the Atlanta Falcons, where began his NFL career in 1969. Zook played 144 games in the NFL and was a Second-team All-Pro selection in 1973. He had been a Second-team All-NFC selection in 1972 and 1973 and was voted to the 1973 Pro Bowl. Zook was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1976 and finished his career there.

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The list of University of Houston people includes notable alumni, former students, and faculty of the University of Houston. Class years usually indicate the year of a graduation unless an entry is denoted by an asterisk (*). In this case, the student did not graduate from the university, and the class year indicates the last known year a former student attended. In the case of alumni with multiple graduation years, the earliest graduation year is shown.

List of University of Kansas people

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Texas Stadium

Texas Stadium was an American football stadium located in Irving, Texas, a suburb west of Dallas. Opened in October 1971, it was known for its distinctive "hole in the roof", after plans to construct a retractable roof were abandoned.

The stadium was the home field of the NFL's Dallas Cowboys for 38 seasons, through 2008, and had a seating capacity of 65,675. In 2009, the Cowboys moved to the $1.15 billion AT&T Stadium in Arlington.Texas Stadium was demolished on April 11, 2010 by a controlled implosion.

Utah Utes football

The Utah Utes football program is a college football team that competes in the Pac-12 Conference (Pac-12) of the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of NCAA Division I and represents the University of Utah. The Utah college football program began in 1892 and has played home games at the current site of Rice-Eccles Stadium since 1927. They have won twenty-four conference championships in five conferences during their history, and, as of the end of the 2017 season, they have a cumulative record of 668 wins, 459 losses, and 31 ties.The Utes have a record of 17–5 (.770) in bowl games. Among Utah's bowl appearances are two games from the Bowl Championship Series (BCS): the Fiesta Bowl and the Sugar Bowl. In the 2005 Fiesta Bowl, Utah defeated the Pittsburgh Panthers 35–7, and in the 2009 Sugar Bowl, they defeated the Alabama Crimson Tide 31–17. During those seasons, Utah was a member of the Mountain West Conference, whose champion does not receive an automatic invitation to a BCS bowl. The Utes were the first team from a conference without an automatic bid to play in a BCS bowl game—colloquially known as being a BCS Buster—and the first BCS Buster to play in a second BCS Bowl.

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