1969 Pro Bowl

The 1969 Pro Bowl was the NFL's nineteenth annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1968 season. The game was played on Sunday, January 19, 1969, at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California. The final score was West 10, East 7. Merlin Olsen of the Los Angeles Rams was selected as lineman for the game. Roman Gabriel of the Rams received the back of the game award.[1]

Attendance at the game was 32,050. The game was noteworthy because of the contributions of Los Angeles Rams players and their coach. George Allen, the coach of the Rams, had been fired after the season. But, after a great outcry from the fans, he was rehired by Rams management after the Pro Bowl. The coach of the East was Tom Landry of the Dallas Cowboys. The game ball was presented to Allen due to his trials in the previous weeks.[2]

1969 East–West Pro Bowl
Eastern Conference Western Conference
7 10
Head coach:
Tom Landry
(Dallas Cowboys)
Head coach:
George Allen
(Los Angeles Rams)
1234 Total
Eastern Conference 0070 7
Western Conference 0307 10
DateJanuary 19, 1969
StadiumMemorial Coliseum, Los Angeles, California
Co-MVPsRoman Gabriel (Los Angeles Rams), Merlin Olsen (Los Angeles Rams)
Attendance32,050
TV in the United States
NetworkCBS
AnnouncersJack Whitaker, Pat Summerall

References

  1. ^ "Gabriel passes West stars to 10–7 Pro Bowl victory". Lodi News-Sentinel. UPI. January 20, 1969. p. 10. Retrieved January 19, 2012.
  2. ^ "The 1969 Pro Bowl". Bolding Sports Research. Archived from the original on January 19, 2012. Retrieved January 19, 2012.

External links

1970 Pro Bowl

The 1970 Pro Bowl was the National Football League's twentieth annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1969 season. The game was played on Sunday, January 18, 1970, at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles. The final score was West 16, East 13. Gale Sayers of the Chicago Bears was named the game's offensive Most Valuable Player (MVP) after rushing for 75 yards on nine carries. George Andrie of the Dallas Cowboys was selected as the defensive MVP.Attendance at the game was 57,786. Norm Van Brocklin of the Atlanta Falcons coached the West squad while the East was led by the New Orleans Saints' Tom Fears. This was the last Pro Bowl to feature the Eastern Conference vs. Western Conference format. After the AFL–NFL merger was completed, future Pro Bowls would pit the AFC against the NFC.

Bob Grim (American football)

Robert Lee Grim (born May 8, 1945) is a former American football player in the National Football League who played from 1967–1977.

Burlington High School (Iowa)

Burlington High School is a four-year public high school located in Burlington, Iowa. The school is part of the Burlington Community School District, and it has an enrollment of 1413 students in grades 9 through 12. It is located at 421 Terrace Street and takes up the entire block on the west side of the street, from Terrace Drive, to Roosevelt Avenue, and north-south, from Division Street, to Johanssen Drive. The current building was completed in 1969, with the first graduating class in 1970, prior to that, the school was located in another two building campus two blocks west of Central Avenue, near the downtown business district. Until 1983, 9th grade students were enrolled in a separate building, the following school year, ninth grade was integrated into the high school.

As the only high school in the district, it serves Burlington and Middletown, as well as residences in the western portion of West Burlington.The school sports teams are called the Grayhounds, and is only one of two high schools in the nation to use a purple and gray color scheme.

Charlie Sanders

Charles Alvin Sanders (August 25, 1946 – July 2, 2015) was an American football player who played tight end for the Detroit Lions of the National Football League from 1968 to 1977. Sanders was chosen for the NFL's 1970s All-Decade Team and voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2007.

Dave Osborn

Dave Osborn (born March 18, 1943 in Everett, Washington) is a former professional American football player who played running back for twelve seasons for the Minnesota Vikings and the Green Bay Packers.

Dave Robinson (American football)

Richard David Robinson (born May 3, 1941) is a former American football player. He played college football at Pennsylvania State University and professionally in the National Football League for the Green Bay Packers and the Washington Redskins. Robinson was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1997 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2013.

George Andrie

George Joseph Andrie (April 20, 1940 – August 21, 2018) was an American professional football defensive end in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys. Prior to his professional career he played college football at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, which dropped its program after his junior season.

Harry Schuh

Harry Frederick Schuh (September 25, 1942 – May 20, 2013) was an American football player. He was an All-American tackle at the University of Memphis in 1963 and 1964. He was the third player drafted overall in the 1965 American Football League draft, after Joe Namath and Larry Elkins. He played for the American Football League's Oakland Raiders from 1965 through 1969 as the starting right tackle, winning the AFL Championship in 1967 and playing in the Second AFL-NFL World Championship Game. Schuh was an AFL Western Division All-Star in 1967, an AFL All-League tackle in 1969, and an AFC selection for the AFC-NFC Pro Bowl in 1970 as a member of the NFL's Raiders. But he was traded before the 1971 season for his replacement at right tackle, Bob Brown, an eventual member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Schuh finished his career with the Green Bay Packers. He was a member of the Raiders' All-Time Team.

Schuh died in Memphis, Tennessee on May 20, 2013.

Jerry Mays (defensive lineman)

Gerald Avery Mays (November 24, 1939 – July 17, 1994) was a football player who starred collegiately for Southern Methodist University before becoming a standout at the professional level for the Kansas City Chiefs.

Joe Kapp

Joseph Robert Kapp (born March 19, 1938) is an American former football player, coach, and executive. He played college football as a quarterback at the University of California, Berkeley. Kapp played professionally in the Canadian Football League (CFL) with the Calgary Stampeders and the BC Lions and then in the National Football League (NFL) with the Minnesota Vikings and the Boston Patriots. Kapp returned to his alma mater to serve as head coach of the California Golden Bears from 1982 to 1986. He was the general manager and president of the BC Lions in 1990.

Kapp is a member of the Canadian Football Hall of Fame, the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame, the BC Lions Wall of Fame, the College Football Hall of Fame, and the University of California Athletic Hall of Fame. Kapp's #22 jersey is one of eight numbers retired by the Lions. In November 2006, Kapp was voted to the Honour Roll of the CFL's top 50 players of the league's modern era by Canadian sports network TSN. Sports Illustrated once called him "The Toughest Chicano." Kapp is the only player to quarterback in the Super Bowl, Rose Bowl, and the Grey Cup.

Jon Morris

Jon Morris (born April 5, 1942) is a former American college and professional football player. His father was John D. Morris, a longtime reporter and editor in the Washington bureau of the New York Times. At Gonzaga College High School in Washington, DC, he was a three-sport athlete in football, basketball and baseball. After Gonzaga he played center and linebacker for three seasons at the College of the Holy Cross. He was the Washington Daily News's Athlete of the Year in 1960 and Holy Cross Varsity Club Athlete of the Year and Lineman of the Year in 1963. He was selected All-East and All-America in his senior year, played in the College All-Star Game and captained the Senior Bowl.

He was inducted into the Holy Cross Hall of Fame in 1973. In 1983 Jon was an inaugural inductee of the Gonzaga College High School Athletic Hall of Fame, joined in 1991 by his brother, Will who quarterbacked at Gonzaga and the University of Maryland as well serving as Gonzaga Head Football Coach from 1975 to 1978.

The Green Bay Packers, coached by Vince Lombardi, picked Morris as their number two draft choice, however Morris chose to go with the Boston Patriots instead and he was signed on as their third pick. Morris was the Patriots' team Rookie of the Year in 1964, and their "Unsung Hero" in 1965. He was an AFL All-Star six times, 1964 through 1969, and was an AFC Pro Bowl Center in 1970; he was the first Patriots player to be selected for the AFC Pro Bowl. Morris was named to the second team, All-Time All-AFL, and to the fan-selected Boston Patriots All-1960s Team. He played 128 games for the Patriots, the eighth best individual record in club history. Morris played three years (1975–1977) with the Detroit Lions, elected by Lions teammates as their "Offensive Player of the Year" in 1975. He played his fifteenth and final professional season with the Chicago Bears in 1978.

Morris recovered several fumbles during his career. The first was a fumble by running back Ron Burton in the Boston Patriots' 24-7 victory over the Kansas City Chiefs at Fenway Park on October 23, 1964. In 1966, he recovered a fumble by running back Larry Garron in the Patriots' 27-27 tie with the Kansas City Chiefs at Municipal Stadium on November 20. He also recovered a fumble by fullback Jim Nance in the Patriots' 16-0 loss to the Houston Oilers at Fenway Park on October 13, 1968.

Morris wore #56 for the Patriots, as did Pro Football Hall of Fame LB Andre Tippett.

After his playing career, Morris worked as the color commentator on Patriots radio broadcasts from 1979 to 1987, followed by color analysis of NFL games for NBC television.

In 2011, Jon Morris was selected by a senior selection committee as a member of the Patriots Hall of Fame.

List of Alabama Crimson Tide players in the NFL draft

The University of Alabama Crimson Tide football team has had 355 players drafted into the National Football League (NFL) since the league began holding drafts in 1936. This includes 61 players taken in the first round and two overall number one picks, Harry Gilmer in the 1948 NFL draft and Joe Namath in the 1965 AFL draft. 29 former Alabama players have been selected to a Pro Bowl, 31 have won a championship with their respective teams and eight have been elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Each NFL franchise seeks to add new players through the annual NFL draft. The draft rules were last updated in 2009. The team with the worst record the previous year picks first, the next-worst team second, and so on. Teams that did not make the playoffs are ordered by their regular-season record with any remaining ties broken by strength of schedule. Playoff participants are sequenced after non-playoff teams, based on their round of elimination (wild card, division, conference, and Super Bowl). Prior to the merger agreements in 1966, the American Football League (AFL) operated in direct competition with the NFL and held a separate draft. This led to a bidding war over top prospects between the two leagues. As part of the merger agreement on June 8, 1966, the two leagues held a multiple-round "common draft". Once the AFL officially merged with the NFL in 1970, the common draft became the NFL draft.

List of Kansas Jayhawks in the NFL Draft

The University of Kansas Jayhawks football team has had 175 players drafted into the National Football League (NFL) since the first draft held in 1936, through the 2018 NFL Draft. KU has seen nine players taken in the first round, including six top-10 picks: Gale Sayers, John Riggins, Ray Evans, Mike Butler, John Hadl, and David Verser. Sayers, a College and Pro Football Hall of Famer, was the highest pick from KU as the fourth overall pick in the 1965 NFL Draft.

Through the annual NFL Draft each NFL franchise gets the chance to add new players to their teams. The current draft rules were established in 2009. The team with the worst record the previous year gets to pick first, then the next-worst team picks second, and so on. Teams that were not in the playoffs receive their draft order by their regular-season record. If 2 or more non-playoff teams have the same record the tie breaker used is their strength of schedule. Playoff teams receive their draft order after all the non-playoff teams, based on their round of elimination (wild card, division, conference, and Super Bowl).In 1944 the All-America Football Conference was established and it began play in 1946 in direct competition with the NFL. From 1946 to 1949 the two leagues fiercely competed for the top college football prospects with each league holding their own drafts, before the AAFC finally merged with the NFL at the end of the 1949 season.

Like the AAFC earlier, the American Football League (AFL) operated in direct competition with the NFL and held a separate draft. This led to a massive bidding war over top prospects between the two leagues. As part of the merger agreement on June 8, 1966, the two leagues would hold a multiple round "Common Draft". Once the AFL officially merged with the NFL in 1970, the "Common Draft" simply became the NFL Draft.Sixteen former Jayhawks who were drafted have been selected to a Pro Bowl or AFL All-Star Game. Twelve former Jayhawks who were drafted have won a championship with their respective teams, one was named MVP, John Riggins in Super Bowl XVII.

List of New England Patriots players

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Milt Sunde

Milton John Sunde (born February 1, 1942) is a former American football player. He played professionally as a guard in the National Football League (NFL) for the Minnesota Vikings from 1964 to 1974. Sunde attended Bloomington High School and the University of Minnesota. He played with the Vikings in two of their losing Super Bowl efforts (IV and IX).

Married to Barbara Sunde. Father to Jennifer Craigan, Katy Sunde, Molly Polding, and Amy Macosko. Grandfather to Clare, Michaela, and Kendall Craigan; Elaina and Drew Polding; Miles, Smith, and Benjamin Macosko.

Ron Jessie

Ron Ray Jessie (February 4, 1948 – January 13, 2006) was an American football wide receiver in the National Football League for the Detroit Lions, Los Angeles Rams and Buffalo Bills. His best season came in 1976 with the Los Angeles Rams, when he was named to the Pro Bowl. He played college football at the University of Kansas.

San Dieguito Academy

San Dieguito High School Academy, originally known as San Dieguito Union High School and San Dieguito High School, is a public high school in the San Dieguito Union High School District in Encinitas, California, San Diego County, which was established in 1936.

Tom Matte

Thomas Roland Matte (born June 14, 1939), is a former American football player who played quarterback in college and primarily running back in the National Football League (NFL) in the 1960s and 1970s and earned a Super Bowl Ring. He attended Shaw High School in East Cleveland and is an Eagle Scout. Matte was an All-American back at Ohio State University.

Vic Washington

Victor Arnold Washington (March 23, 1946 – December 31, 2008) was an American football running back and kick returner. After attending the University of Wyoming, he played nine professional seasons, three in the Canadian Football League (CFL) and six in the National Football League (NFL).

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