1969 Minnesota Twins season

Led by new manager Billy Martin, the 1969 Minnesota Twins won the newly formed American League West with a 97–65 record, nine games over the second-place Oakland Athletics. The Twins were swept by the Baltimore Orioles in the first American League Championship Series.

1969 Minnesota Twins
American League West Champions
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s)Calvin Griffith (majority owner, with Thelma Griffith Haynes)
General manager(s)Calvin Griffith
Manager(s)Billy Martin
Local televisionWTCN-TV
Local radio830 WCCO AM
(Herb Carneal, Halsey Hall, Merle Harmon)
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Regular season

In the first year of divisional play, the Twins won the American League West, led by Rod Carew (.332, his first AL batting title), Tony Oliva (.309, 24 HR, 101 RBI) and league MVP Harmon Killebrew (49 HR, 140 RBI – both league-leading totals). Carew stole home 7 times. Leadoff batter César Tovar was third in the AL with 45 stolen bases. Jim Perry and Dave Boswell each won 20 games, the first and only time a Minnesota club has held two 20-game winners. Reliever Ron Perranoski became the first Twin to lead the AL in saves with 31. Pitcher Jim Kaat won his 8th Gold Glove Award.

In the May 18 loss to Detroit, Twins stole five bases during the third inning to tie a major league record. Four bases were stolen during Harmon Killebrew's at-bat: César Tovar stole home, and Rod Carew stole second, third and then home.[1]

On June 21 in Oakland, the Twins were tied 3–3 with the A's going into the tenth inning. In the top of the inning, Minnesota scored eleven times, tying a 1928 New York Yankees record. The Twins won the game 14–4.[2]

Four Twins made the All-Star Game: first baseman Killebrew, second baseman Carew, outfielder Oliva, and catcher Johnny Roseboro. Harmon Killebrew became the second Twin to be named American League Most Valuable Player.

1,349,328 fans attended Twins games, the third highest total in the American League.

Season standings

AL West W L Pct. GB Home Road
Minnesota Twins 97 65 0.599 57–24 40–41
Oakland Athletics 88 74 0.543 9 49–32 39–42
California Angels 71 91 0.438 26 43–38 28–53
Kansas City Royals 69 93 0.426 28 36–45 33–48
Chicago White Sox 68 94 0.420 29 41–40 27–54
Seattle Pilots 64 98 0.395 33 34–47 30–51

Record vs. opponents

1969 American League Records

Sources: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12]
Team BAL BOS CAL CWS CLE DET KC MIN NYY OAK SEA WSH
Baltimore 10–8 6–6 9–3 13–5 11–7 11–1 8–4 11–7 8–4 9–3 13–5
Boston 8–10 8–4 5–7 12–6 10–8 10–2 7–5 11–7 4–8 6–6 6–12
California 6–6 4–8 9–9 8–4 5–7 9–9 7–11 3–9 6–12 9–9–1 5–7
Chicago 3–9 7–5 9–9 8–4 3–9 8–10 5–13 3–9 8–10 10–8 4–8
Cleveland 5–13 6–12 4–8 4–8 7–11 7–5 5–7 9–8 5–7 7–5 3–15
Detroit 7–11 8–10 7–5 9–3 11–7 8–4 6–6 10–8 7–5 10–2 7–11
Kansas City 1–11 2–10 9–9 10–8 5–7 4–8 8–10 5–7–1 8–10 10–8 7–5
Minnesota 4–8 5–7 11–7 13–5 7–5 6–6 10–8 10–2 13–5 12–6 6–6
New York 7–11 7–11 9–3 9–3 8–9 8–10 7–5–1 2–10 6–6 7–5 10–8
Oakland 4–8 8–4 12–6 10–8 7–5 5–7 10–8 5–13 6–6 13–5 8–4
Seattle 3–9 6–6 9–9–1 8–10 5–7 2–10 8–10 6–12 5–7 5–13 7–5
Washington 5–13 12–6 7–5 8–4 15–3 11–7 5–7 6–6 8–10 4–8 5–7

Notable transactions

Roster

1969 Minnesota Twins
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders

Other batters

Manager

Coaches

Player stats

= Indicates team leader

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
C Johnny Roseboro 115 361 95 .263 3 32
1B Rich Reese 132 419 135 .322 16 69
2B Rod Carew 123 458 152 .332 8 56
3B Harmon Killebrew 162 555 153 .276 49 140
SS Leo Cárdenas 160 578 162 .280 10 70
LF Bob Allison 81 554 151 .273 8 62
RF Tony Oliva 153 637 197 .309 24 101

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
César Tovar 158 535 154 .288 11 52
Graig Nettles 96 225 50 .222 7 26
George Mitterwald 69 187 48 .257 5 13
Charlie Manuel 83 164 34 .207 2 24
Frank Quilici 118 144 25 .174 2 12
Rick Renick 71 139 34 .254 5 17
Tom Tischinski 37 47 9 .191 0 2
Jim Holt 12 14 5 .357 1 2
Cotton Nash 6 9 2 .222 0 0
Ron Clark 5 8 1 .125 0 0
Rick Dempsey 5 6 3 .500 0 0
Frank Kostro 2 2 0 .000 0 0
Herman Hill 16 2 0 .000 0 0

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Jim Perry 46 261.2 20 6 2.82 153
Dave Boswell 39 256.1 20 12 3.23 190
Jim Kaat 40 242.1 14 13 3.49 139
Tom Hall 20 140.2 8 7 3.33 92
Dean Chance 20 88.1 5 4 2.95 50

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Bob Miller 48 119.1 5 5 3.02 57
Dick Woodson 44 110.1 7 5 3.67 66
Danny Morris 3 5.1 0 1 5.06 1

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO
Ron Perranoski 75 9 10 31 2.11 62
Al Worthington 46 9 10 3 4.57 51
Joe Grzenda 38 4 1 3 3.88 24
Jerry Crider 21 1 0 1 4.71 16
Charley Walters 6 0 0 0 5.40 2
Bill Zepp 4 0 0 0 6.75 2
Bucky Brandon 3 0 0 0 2.70 1

Postseason

The Twins were swept 3–0 by the Baltimore Orioles in the 1969 American League Championship Series.

Awards and honors

Farm system

Level Team League Manager
AAA Denver Bears American Association Don Heffner
AA Charlotte Hornets Southern League Ralph Rowe
A Red Springs Twins Carolina League Tom Umphlett
A Orlando Twins Florida State League Harry Warner
A Wisconsin Rapids Twins Midwest League Tom Videtich
A-Short Season Auburn Twins New York–Penn League Steve Thornton
A-Short Season St. Cloud Rox Northern League Jim Merrick
Rookie GCL Twins Gulf Coast League Fred Waters

LEAGUE CHAMPIONS: Charlotte

Notes

  1. ^ "May 18, 1969 Detroit Tigers at Minnesota Twins Box Score and Play by Play". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 25, 2016.
  2. ^ "June 21, 1969 Minnesota Twins at Oakland Athletics Box Score and Play by Play". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 25, 2016.
  3. ^ Bert Blyleven at Baseball Reference
  4. ^ Jim Hughes at Baseball Reference

References

Dave Boswell (baseball)

David Wilson Boswell (January 20, 1945 – June 11, 2012) was an American right-handed pitcher who spent eight seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB), all in the American League (AL), with the Minnesota Twins (1964–1970), Detroit Tigers, and Baltimore Orioles (both in 1971). He won twenty games as a starting pitcher during the 1969 Minnesota Twins season, the only time he achieved the feat during his major league career.

Boswell graduated from Calvert Hall College High School in 1963. He drew the interest of several major league teams. One was the hometown Orioles who had ranked him and Wally Bunker as the two best pitching prospects in the country. Not able to afford giving each of them huge signing bonuses, the ballclub only signed Bunker after being disappointed by Boswell's performance during his senior year. Boswell eventually signed with the Twins for US $15,000. Even though the New York Yankees had offered the same amount of money, he decided that his chances to make the majors were better with Minnesota.After debuting with the Twins in 1965, Boswell pitched for the Twins in the team's World Series loss to the Los Angeles Dodgers. In 1966, Boswell's .706 winning percentage (based on a 12–5 record) led the American League. Following a 1969 game against the Detroit Tigers, Boswell got into a fight with teammate Bob Allison and Manager Billy Martin outside the Lindell AC bar near Tiger Stadium. After knocking out Allison with one punch, Boswell was in turn knocked out by Martin, resulting in a cut that required 20 stitches. Despite the off-field injury, Boswell would win 20 games in 1969, helping the Twins win the American League West.

During the American League Championship Series, Boswell lost 1–0 in 11 innings to Baltimore Orioles pitcher Dave McNally. He later revealed that he had suffered a career-ending arm injury during the game on a slider thrown to strike out slugger Frank Robinson in the bottom of the 10th. "It felt like my shoulder went right into my jawbone," Boswell would tell the Fort Myers News-Press years later. "The arm would actually turn black and run all the way down to the elbow."

After being released by the Twins following the 1970 season, Boswell briefly played for the Detroit Tigers and the Baltimore Orioles during the 1971 season.

Boswell was the losing pitcher in Catfish Hunter's perfect game on May 8, 1968.Boswell died of a heart attack at his Joppatowne, Maryland, home on June 11, 2012.

Jerry Crider

Jerry Stephen Crider (September 2, 1941 – April 4, 2008) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Minnesota Twins (1969) and Chicago White Sox (1970). Listed at 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m), 180 lb., Crider batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

In a two-season career, Crider posted a 5–7 record with a 4.51 ERA in 53 appearances, including nine starts, giving up 64 runs (four unearned) on 132 hits and 49 walks while striking out 56 in 119 ⅔ innings of work.

Following his baseball career, Crider moved to Mexico and opened a hunting business. He died in Phoenix, Arizona, at the age of 66 and was buried in Mexico.

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