1968 Pro Bowl

The 1968 Pro Bowl was the National Football League's eighteenth annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1967 season. The game was played on January 21, 1968, at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California. The final score was West 38, East 20. Gale Sayers of the Chicago Bears was named the back of the game for the second year in a row and Dave Robinson of the Green Bay Packers received the lineman of the game honors.[1]

LA Coliseum gate
The front of L.A. Memorial Coliseum

Attendance at the game was 53,289. The game had controversy because East coach Otto Graham of the Washington Redskins benched quarterback Fran Tarkenton in the fourth quarter. Some players questioned the benching of a player of Tarkenton’s stature in a charity game. The coach of the West squad was Don Shula of the Baltimore Colts, who won his second Pro Bowl in four years.[2]

1968 East–West Pro Bowl
Eastern Conference Western Conference
20 38
Head coach:
Otto Graham
(Washington Redskins)
Head coach:
Don Shula
(Baltimore Colts)
1234 Total
Eastern Conference 01370 20
Western Conference 107021 38
DateJanuary 21, 1968
StadiumMemorial Coliseum, Los Angeles, California
Co-MVPsGale Sayers (Chicago Bears), Dave Robinson (Green Bay Packers)
Attendance53,289
TV in the United States
NetworkCBS
AnnouncersJack Buck, Tom Brookshier

References

  1. ^ "Defensive plays turn tide for West in Pro Bowl win". The Pittsburgh Press. UPI. January 22, 1968. p. 24. Retrieved January 19, 2012.
  2. ^ "The 1968 Pro Bowl". Bolding Sports Research. Archived from the original on January 19, 2012. Retrieved January 19, 2012.

External links

1969 Pro Bowl

The 1969 Pro Bowl was the NFL's nineteenth annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1968 season. The game was played on Sunday, January 19, 1969, at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California. The final score was West 10, East 7. Merlin Olsen of the Los Angeles Rams was selected as lineman for the game. Roman Gabriel of the Rams received the back of the game award.Attendance at the game was 32,050. The game was noteworthy because of the contributions of Los Angeles Rams players and their coach. George Allen, the coach of the Rams, had been fired after the season. But, after a great outcry from the fans, he was rehired by Rams management after the Pro Bowl. The coach of the East was Tom Landry of the Dallas Cowboys. The game ball was presented to Allen due to his trials in the previous weeks.

John Elliott (defensive lineman)

John Elliott (October 26, 1944 – November 11, 2010) was an American college and Professional Football defensive tackle. He played collegiately for the University of Texas, and in 1967 was drafted by the American Football League's New York Jets. As a rookie, he started for the Jets in their defeat of the Oakland Raiders in the 1968 AFL Championship Game, and then in the third AFL-NFL World Championship Game, helping them defeat the heavily favored Baltimore Colts in one of the AFL's greatest games. He played for the AFL's Jets through 1969, and then for the National Football League Jets from 1970 through 1973. Elliott played for the New York Stars of the World Football League in 1974. John Elliott died of cancer at MD Anderson Hospital in Houston on November 11, 2010.

Lem Barney

Lemuel Joseph Barney (born September 8, 1945) is a former American football player. A native of Gulfport, Mississippi, he played college football at Jackson State from 1964 to 1966. He was drafted by the Detroit Lions of the National Football League (NFL) and played for the Lions as a cornerback, return specialist, and punter from 1967 to 1977. He was selected as the NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year in 1967, played in seven Pro Bowls, and was selected as a first-team All-NFL player in 1968 and 1969. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1992. He has also been inducted into the Detroit Lions Hall of Fame, the Jackson State Sports Hall of Fame, the Michigan Sports Hall of Fame, and the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame.

Lenny Lyles

Lenny Lyles (January 26, 1936 – November 20, 2011) was a professional American football defensive back who played 12 seasons in the National Football League (NFL). He started in Super Bowl III for the Baltimore Colts. The 6-2, 202-pound Lyles was recruited by the University of Louisville in 1954, when he broke the school's color barrier for scholarship athletes. Lyles remains Louisville's all-time scoring leader for a non-kicker with 300 points. After a successful collegiate career, where Lyles was known for his return skills, he was drafted by the Baltimore Colts in the first round of the 1958 NFL Draft. He spent one year with the Colts before joining the 49ers in 1959. After two seasons in San Francisco, Lyles returned to the Colts where he remained until the end of his career in 1969. Lyles finished his professional career with 2,161 return yards and averaged 26.7 yards per return. Lyles spent 27 years as an executive with Brown & Williamson in Louisville.

List of University of Houston people

The list of University of Houston people includes notable alumni, former students, and faculty of the University of Houston. Class years usually indicate the year of a graduation unless an entry is denoted by an asterisk (*). In this case, the student did not graduate from the university, and the class year indicates the last known year a former student attended. In the case of alumni with multiple graduation years, the earliest graduation year is shown.

List of first overall National Football League draft picks

This is a list of first overall National Football League draft picks. The National Football League draft is an annual sports draft in which NFL teams select newly eligible players for their rosters. To be eligible, a player must be out of high school at least three years. Each NFL franchise seeks to add new players through the annual NFL draft. The draft rules were last updated in 2009. The team with the worst record the previous year picks first, the next-worst team second, and so on. Teams also have the option to trade with another team to move up to a better draft position. Teams that did not make the playoffs are ordered by their regular-season record, with any remaining ties broken by strength of schedule. Playoff participants are sequenced after non-playoff teams, based on their round of elimination (wild card, division, conference, and Super Bowl).From 1947 through 1958 the first selection was awarded by a random draw. The team which received this "bonus" pick forfeited its selection in the final round of the draft. The winner of the "bonus pick" was eliminated from the draw in future years. By 1958 all twelve clubs in the league at the time had received a bonus choice and the system was abolished.Before the merger agreements in 1966, the American Football League (AFL) operated in direct competition with the NFL and held a separate draft. This led to a massive bidding war over top prospects between the two leagues, along with the subsequent drafting of the same player in each draft. As part of the merger agreement on June 8, 1966, the two leagues held a multiple round "Common Draft". Once the AFL officially merged with the NFL in 1970, the "Common Draft" simply became the NFL Draft.Through the 2018 NFL draft, 83 players have been selected first overall, with the most recent being Baker Mayfield. The Indianapolis Colts – formerly the Baltimore Colts – have made the most first overall selections in history with seven. Of the first overall draft picks, 43 have been selected to a Pro Bowl and of those 43, twelve have been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. While the Heisman Trophy is awarded annually to the most outstanding player in U.S. college football, only 21 of those Heisman winners have been selected first overall in the NFL draft. Only five first overall draft pick players have been selected the NFL Rookie of the Year: Earl Campbell (1978); Billy Sims (1980); George Rogers (1981); Sam Bradford (2010); and Cam Newton (2011).

Warren Wells

Warren Wells (November 14, 1942 – December 27, 2018) was an American college and professional football player, who played wide receiver for five seasons, with the Detroit Lions and Oakland Raiders. He had success with the Raiders with one 1,000-yard season and a Pro Bowl nomination, but saw his career end because of legal troubles.

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