1968 NBA draft

The 1968 NBA draft was the 22nd annual draft of the National Basketball Association (NBA). The draft was held on April 3, 1968, and May 8 and 10, 1968 before the 1968–69 season.[1] In this draft, 14 NBA teams took turns selecting amateur U.S. college basketball players. A player who had finished his four-year college eligibility was eligible for selection. If a player left college early, he would not be eligible for selection until his college class graduated. The first two picks in the draft belonged to the teams that finished last in each division, with the order determined by a coin flip.[2] The San Diego Rockets won the coin flip and were awarded the first overall pick, while the Baltimore Bullets were awarded the second pick. The remaining first-round picks and the subsequent rounds were assigned to teams in reverse order of their win–loss record in the previous season. Six teams that had the best records in previous season were not awarded second round draft picks. Two expansion franchises, the Milwaukee Bucks and the Phoenix Suns, took part in the NBA Draft for the first time and were assigned the seventh and eighth pick in the first round, along with the last two picks of each subsequent round. The St. Louis Hawks relocated to Atlanta and became the Atlanta Hawks prior to the start of the season.[3] The draft consisted of 21 rounds comprising 214 players selected.

1968 NBA draft
General information
SportBasketball
Date(s)April 3, 1968 (First round)
May 8 and 10, 1968 (Other rounds)
LocationNew York City, New York
Overview
214 total selections in 21 rounds
LeagueNBA
First selectionElvin Hayes, San Diego Rockets

Draft selections and draftee career notes

Elvin Hayes from the University of Houston was selected first overall by the San Diego Rockets. Wes Unseld from the University of Louisville was selected second by the Baltimore Bullets. He went on to win the Rookie of the Year Award and the Most Valuable Player Award in his first season,[4][5] becoming only the second player to win both awards in the same season, after Wilt Chamberlain in 1960. Hayes and Unseld have been inducted to the Basketball Hall of Fame.[6] They were also named in the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History list announced at the league's 50th anniversary in 1996.[7] Hayes and Unseld both won the NBA championship with the Washington Bullets in 1978. In the Finals, Unseld was named as the Finals Most Valuable Player. Unseld, who spent all of his 13-year playing career with the Bullets, was also selected to one All-NBA Team and five All-Star Games, while Hayes was selected to six All-NBA Teams and twelve All-Star Games.[8][9] Bob Kauffman, the third pick, is the only other player from this draft who has been selected to an All-Star Game; he was selected to three All-Star Games during his career.[10]

Unseld became a head coach after ending his playing career. He coached the Washington Bullets for seven seasons.[11] Three other players drafted also went on to have a coaching career: 12th pick Don Chaney and 79th pick Rick Adelman. Chaney coached four NBA teams and won the Coach of the Year Award in 1991 with the Houston Rockets.[12][13] Adelman coached four NBA teams, most recently with the Houston Rockets. He lost the NBA Finals twice with the Portland Trail Blazers in 1990 and 1992.[14]

In the fourteenth round, the Seattle SuperSonics selected Mike Warren of UCLA. However, Warren never played professional basketball; he opted for an acting career in films and television instead.[15]

Key

Pos. G F C
Position Guard Forward Center
^ Denotes player who has been inducted to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame
+ Denotes player who has been selected for at least one All-Star Game
# Denotes player who never appeared in an NBA regular season or playoff game

Draft

Elvin Hayes
Elvin Hayes was selected first overall by the San Diego Rockets.
Wes Unseld 1975.jpeg
Wes Unseld was selected second overall by the Baltimore Bullets.
Bob Kauffman 1969
Bob Kauffman was selected third overall by the Chicago Bulls.
Round Pick Player Pos. Nationality Team School/club team
1 1 Elvin Hayes^ F/C  United States San Diego Rockets Houston
1 2 Wes Unseld^ F/C  United States Baltimore Bullets Louisville
1 3 Bob Kauffman+ F/C  United States Seattle SuperSonics Guilford
1 4 Tom Boerwinkle C  United States Chicago Bulls Tennessee
1 5 Don Smith
(now Zaid Abdul-Aziz)1[›]
F/C  United States Cincinnati Royals Iowa State
1 6 Otto Moore F/C  United States Detroit Pistons Pan American
1 7 Charlie Paulk F/C  United States Milwaukee Bucks Northeastern State
1 8 Gary Gregor F/C  United States Phoenix Suns South Carolina
1 9 Ron Williams G  United States San Francisco Warriors West Virginia
1 10 Bill Hosket F/C  United States New York Knicks Ohio State
1 11 Bill Hewitt F  United States Los Angeles Lakers USC
1 12 Don Chaney G  United States Boston Celtics Houston
1 13 Skip Harlicka G  United States Atlanta Hawks South Carolina
1 14 Shaler Halimon G/F  United States Philadelphia 76ers Utah State
2 15 John Trapp F  United States San Diego Rockets Nevada Southern
2 16 Art Harris G  United States Seattle SuperSonics Stanford
2 17 Loy Petersen G  United States Chicago Bulls Oregon State
2 18 Bob Quick G/F  United States Baltimore Bullets Xavier (OH)
2 19 Ron Dunlap# C  United States Chicago Bulls (from Cincinnati)[a] Illinois
2 20 Manny Leaks F/C  United States Detroit Pistons Niagara
2 21 Dick Cunningham C  United States Phoenix Suns Murray State
2 22 Gene Moore# F/C  United States Milwaukee Bucks Saint Louis

Other picks

The following list includes other draft picks who have appeared in at least one NBA game.[16][17]

Round Pick Player Pos. Nationality Team School/club team
3 23 Stu Lantz G  United States San Diego Rockets Nebraska
3 27 Pat Frink G  United States Cincinnati Royals Colorado
3 28 Fred Foster F  United States Cincinnati Royals (from Detroit)[b] Miami (OH)
3 30 Don May F  United States New York Knicks Dayton
3 31 Dave Newmark C  United States Chicago Bulls (from Los Angeles)[c] Columbia
3 32 Garfield Smith F/C  United States Boston Celtics Eastern Kentucky
3 35 Sam Williams G  United States Milwaukee Bucks Iowa
4 37 Harry Barnes F  United States San Diego Rockets Northeastern
4 39 Mike Lynn F  United States Chicago Bulls UCLA
4 42 Rich Niemann C  United States Detroit Pistons Saint Louis
4 45 Ed Biedenbach G  United States Los Angeles Lakers North Carolina State
4 46 Rich Johnson C  United States Boston Celtics Grambling
4 49 Rich Jones F/C  United States Phoenix Suns Memphis State
4 50 Greg Smith F  United States Milwaukee Bucks Western Kentucky
5 52 Al Hairston G  United States Seattle SuperSonics Bowling Green
5 57 Jim Eakins C  United States San Francisco Warriors Brigham Young
6 70 Wally Anderzunas F/C  United States Detroit Pistons Creighton
6 71 Bob Allen F  United States San Francisco Warriors Marshall
6 76 Chuck Williams G  United States Philadelphia 76ers Colorado
6 77 Rod Knowles F/C  United States Phoenix Suns Davidson
7 79 Rick Adelman G  United States San Diego Rockets Loyola (CA)
8 96 Barry Orms G  United States Baltimore Bullets Saint Louis
10 122 Joe Kennedy F  United States Seattle SuperSonics Duke
10 131 Dwight Waller F  United States Atlanta Hawks Tennessee State
11 136 Jim Marsh F  United States Seattle SuperSonics USC
11 147 Ron Boone G/F  United States Phoenix Suns Idaho State
13 162 Bud Ogden F  United States Seattle SuperSonics Santa Clara
13 163 Herm Gilliam G/F  United States Chicago Bulls Purdue
15 187 Johnny Baum F  United States Los Angeles Lakers Temple
17 202 Milt Williams G  United States New York Knicks Lincoln (MO)

Trades

Notes

^ 1: Don Smith changed his name to Zaid Abdul-Aziz in 1976.[23]

References

General
  • "Complete First Round Results 1960–69". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on 21 March 2010. Retrieved March 15, 2010.
  • "1968 NBA Draft". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved March 15, 2010.
  • "1967–1971 NBA Drafts". The Association for Professional Basketball Research. Retrieved March 15, 2010.
  • "1968 NBA Draft". The Draft Review. Retrieved March 15, 2010.
Specific
  1. ^ "Atlanta Gets Cage Hawks". Ocala Star-Banner. May 5, 1968. Retrieved March 16, 2010.
  2. ^ "Evolution of the Draft and Lottery". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on 21 March 2010. Retrieved March 16, 2010.
  3. ^ "Hawks: Franchise History". NBA.com/Hawks. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on 19 March 2010. Retrieved March 16, 2010.
  4. ^ "Rookie of the Year". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on 7 March 2009. Retrieved March 16, 2009.
  5. ^ "Most Valuable Player". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on 18 March 2009. Retrieved March 16, 2009.
  6. ^ "Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame Inductees". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved March 16, 2010.
  7. ^ "The NBA's 50 Greatest Players". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on 5 April 2010. Retrieved March 16, 2010.
  8. ^ "Wes Unseld Bio". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on 6 March 2009. Retrieved March 17, 2009.
  9. ^ "Elvin Hayes Bio". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on 9 March 2009. Retrieved March 17, 2009.
  10. ^ "Bob Kauffman Statistics". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved March 17, 2010.
  11. ^ "Wes Unseld Coaching Record". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved April 11, 2010.
  12. ^ "Don Chaney Coaching Record". basketball-reference.com. Archived from the original on 23 May 2010. Retrieved April 11, 2010.
  13. ^ "Coach of the Year". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on 29 April 2009. Retrieved April 11, 2009.
  14. ^ "Rick Adelman Coaching Record". basketball-reference.com. Archived from the original on 7 April 2010. Retrieved April 11, 2010.
  15. ^ Michael Warren (actor)
  16. ^ https://www.basketball-reference.com/draft/NBA_1968.html
  17. ^ http://basketball.realgm.com/nba/draft/past_drafts/1968
  18. ^ "Guy Rodgers Statistics". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved March 16, 2010.
  19. ^ a b "Chicago Bulls All-Time Transactions". NBA.com/Bulls. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on 17 March 2010. Retrieved March 16, 2010.
  20. ^ "Len Chappell Statistics". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved March 16, 2010.
  21. ^ "Pistons: All-Time Transactions". NBA.com/Pistons. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on 20 March 2010. Retrieved March 16, 2010.
  22. ^ "Jim Barnes Statistics". basketball-reference.com. Archived from the original on 4 March 2010. Retrieved March 16, 2010.
  23. ^ Abdul-Aziz, Zaid (2006). Darkness to Sunlight. Sunlight Publishing Inc. ISBN 978-0-9778861-0-4. Archived from the original on 6 April 2010. Retrieved 16 March 2010.

External links

1967–68 Iowa Hawkeyes men's basketball team

The 1967–68 Iowa Hawkeyes men's basketball team represented the University of Iowa in intercollegiate basketball during the 1967–68 season. The team was led by Ralph Miller and played their home games at the Iowa Field House. The Hawkeyes finished the season 16–9 and were Big Ten co-Champions with a 10-4 conference record.

Senior guard Sam Williams was named Big Ten Player of the Year after averaging 25.3 points per game and 10.9 rebounds per game. To date, he is the last winner of the award for the Iowa men's basketball team.

Bob Allen (basketball)

Robert J. Allen (born July 17, 1946) is a retired American basketball player.

Allen played collegiately for Marshall University. He was selected by the San Francisco Warriors in the 6th round (71st pick overall) of the 1968 NBA draft. He played in 27 games in the NBA for the Warriors (1968/69 season).

Edgar Lacy

Edgar Eddie Lacy (August 2, 1944 – March 22, 2011) was an American basketball player who won two NCAA championships at UCLA, then played one season in the American Basketball Association with the Los Angeles Stars. In public printed media, his last name was generally rendered as Lacey. However, at the time he signed his professional contract, he indicated the correct spelling had always been Lacy.Lacy was a highly decorated player at Jefferson High School in Los Angeles. He was twice named a high school All-American by Parade Magazine and was Los Angeles city player of the year as a senior in 1963. Lacy chose to attend hometown UCLA and play for future Hall of Fame coach John Wooden. In his sophomore season, he was a starter on the Bruins' 1964–65 championship team. After a strong junior season, Lacy redshirted what would have been his senior year with a broken leg in 1966–67 as the Bruins won their third championship.

In 1967–68, Lacy opted to return and was again a starter for the Bruins. However, in a highly anticipated match-up between the Bruins and the Houston Cougars—a contest dubbed the "Game of the Century" by the media—Wooden benched Lacy after 11 minutes and he never re-entered the game. Upset with Wooden's public comments implying that he did not want back into the game, Lacy quit the team, missing what would be another UCLA championship run. "I've never enjoyed playing for that man," Lacy said of Wooden after quitting. In 2008, Wooden stated, "I'm sorry I said that. It hurt him, and that's why he quit. I was very disappointed. Edgar was a fine boy."Lacy was drafted by the San Francisco Warriors in the fourth round of the 1968 NBA Draft (he had also been drafted by the Boston Celtics the previous year). However, he instead played in the ABA for the Los Angeles Stars. Lacy played one season for the Stars, averaging 5.1 points and 3.9 rebounds in 46 games. Prior to the next season, he retired from professional basketball, stating his intention to return to college to pursue a law degree. Lacy ended up playing his entire basketball career -- high school, college and pro -- for teams based in Los Angeles.

Edgar Lacy lived in West Sacramento, California where he died on March 22, 2011. He was survived by his daughter, Celeste Lacy.

Gene Moore (basketball)

Eugene Wilbert Moore (born July 29, 1945) is an American former professional basketball player from St. Louis, Missouri.

A 6'9" center from Saint Louis University, Moore was selected in the second round of the 1968 NBA Draft by the Milwaukee Bucks and by the Kentucky Colonels in the American Basketball Association draft.Moore played in the American Basketball Association from 1968 through 1970 for the Kentucky Colonels, and spent the 1970-71 season with the Texas Chaparrals. After playing for the New York Nets during the 1971-72 season, Moore was selected by the expansion San Diego Conquistadors in the 1972 expansion draft and played two seasons with that team before finishing his ABA career with the Spirits of St. Louis during the 1974-75 season. Moore averaged 12.0 points per game and 9.4 rebounds per game in his ABA career and appeared in the 1970 ABA All-Star Game.

Moore holds the ABA records for the most personal fouls in a season (382 in 1969-70), the most personal fouls in an ABA career (1,348), and the most disqualifications in an ABA career (43).

George Stone (basketball)

George E. Stone (February 9, 1946 – December 30, 1993) was an American professional basketball player who spent several seasons in the American Basketball Association (ABA). He was drafted in the ninth round of the 1968 NBA draft (115th pick overall) by the Los Angeles Lakers, but never played for them or any other NBA team.

A 6'7" forward from Marshall University, Stone played four seasons (1968–1972) in the ABA as a member of the Los Angeles Stars, Utah Stars, and Carolina Cougars. He averaged 13.6 points per game over the course of his career and ranked tenth in ABA history in three point field goal percentage (.323). He also won a league championship with the Utah Stars in 1971.Stone died of a heart attack on December 30, 1993.

Glynn Saulters

Grady Glynn Saulters Jr. (born February 10, 1945) is an American former professional basketball player born in Minden, Louisiana.

A 6'2" guard from Northeast Louisiana University (now the University of Louisiana at Monroe), Saulters competed at the 1968 Summer Olympics, where he won a gold medal with the United States national basketball team. Despite being drafted in the 12th round (152nd overall pick) of the 1968 NBA draft by the National Basketball Association's Cincinnati Royals, he played one season (1968–69) in the American Basketball Association as a member of the New Orleans Buccaneers, scoring 59 points in 22 games.

Greg Smith (basketball, born 1947)

Gregory Darnell Smith (born January 28, 1947) is an American retired basketball player.

Smith was born in Princeton, Kentucky and played college basketball at Western Kentucky University and was drafted by the Kentucky Colonels in the 1968 American Basketball Association draft and by the Milwaukee Bucks in the fourth round of the 1968 NBA draft.Smith played forward for the Milwaukee Bucks (1968–72), Houston Rockets (1972) and Portland Trail Blazers (1972–76).

He helped the Bucks win the 1970–71 NBA Championship and the 1971–72 NBA Midwest Division.

In 8 seasons Smith played in 524 games and had 12,269 minutes played. He had a .482 field goal percentage (1,737 for 3,607), and a .646 free throw percentage (623 for 965). He recorded 3,249 total rebounds, 969 assists, 1,553 personal fouls and 4,097 points.

Harry Barnes (basketball)

Harry J. Barnes (born July 25, 1945) is a retired American basketball player.

He played collegiately for Northeastern University and Thornhill School.

He was selected by the San Diego Rockets in the 4th round (37th pick overall) of the 1968 NBA draft.

He played for the Rockets (1968–69) in the NBA for 22 games.

Jim Eakins

James Scott Eakins (born May 24, 1946) is a retired American professional basketball player.

A 6'11" center from Brigham Young University, Eakins was selected in the fifth round of the 1968 NBA draft by the San Francisco Warriors and in the 1968 ABA Draft by the Oakland Oaks.

Eakins played eight seasons (1968–1976) in the American Basketball Association as a member of the Oakland Oaks, Washington Caps, Virginia Squires, Utah Stars, and New York Nets. He won ABA championships in 1969 with the Oakland Oaks and in 1976 with the New York Nets. Eakins also represented Virginia in the 1974 ABA All-Star Game.

After the ABA–NBA merger in 1976, Eakins played in the NBA until 1978 as a member of the Kansas City Kings, San Antonio Spurs, and Milwaukee Bucks. In his ABA/NBA career, he scored 8,255 points and grabbed 5,578 rebounds.

Johnny Baum

John "Jumpin' Johnny" Baum (born June 17, 1946) is a retired American basketball player. Born in Philadelphia, he played collegiately for Temple University.A 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m) and 200 lb (91 kg) forward, he was selected by the Los Angeles Lakers in the 15th round (187th pick overall) of the 1968 NBA draft and by the Chicago Bulls in the second round (23rd pick overall) of the 1969 NBA draft.

He played for the Chicago Bulls (1969–71) in the NBA and for the New York Nets (1971–73), Memphis Tams and Indiana Pacers (1973–74) in the American Basketball Association (ABA) for 244 games.

Loy Petersen

Loy M. Petersen (born July 26, 1945) is a retired American professional basketball player who played in the National Basketball Association from 1968–1970. A guard, he played in college for Oregon State University, and was drafted in the second round (17th overall) of the 1968 NBA draft by the Chicago Bulls; previously, he was also drafted in the 17th round of the 1967 NBA draft by the Baltimore Bullets (now the Washington Wizards). He played in 69 career games over two seasons for the Bulls.

Loy now lives in Madras, Oregon, with his wife, Carol.

Manny Leaks

Emanuel Leaks, Jr. (born November 27, 1945) is an American former professional basketball player.

Born in Cleveland, Ohio, Leaks was a 6'8" forward/center who played at Niagara University from 1965 to 1968. He averaged 17.3 points and 15.1 rebounds per game over his collegiate career, and pulled down 30 rebounds in a 1966 game against Syracuse University.Leaks was selected by the Detroit Pistons with the 20th pick of the 1968 NBA draft, but he began his professional career in the American Basketball Association, where he played four seasons as a member of the Kentucky Colonels, New York Nets, Dallas Chaparrals, Texas Chaparrals, Utah Stars, and Floridians. He averaged 13.5 points and 9.9 rebounds per game during his stint in the ABA, which ended in 1972 in the wake of salary disputes with the Floridians. From 1972 to 1974, Leaks played in the NBA as a member of the Philadelphia 76ers and Capital Bullets, averaging 8.3 points and 6.8 rebounds per game.

Mike Butler (basketball)

Michael Edward Butler (born October 22, 1946 died November 18, 2018) is an American former professional basketball player born in Memphis, Tennessee.

He was selected in the 1968 NBA draft by the San Diego Rockets, and in the 1972 American Basketball Association (ABA) Draft by the San Diego Conquistadors. He played four seasons in the ABA with the New Orleans Buccaneers and the Utah Stars.

Since retiring from professional basketball, Butler has been working in the transportation and distribution business. He lives in Lakeland, Tennessee.Butler lived in St. Louis, Missouri for a short period of time (from 1959–1961) and attended Lindbergh High School. From 1962–1964 Mike played for Coach Bill Todd at Memphis Kingsbury High School. In 102 games he set the then Shelby Metro Area Record by scoring 1,976 points.

Mike Lynn (basketball)

Michael Edward Lynn (born November 25, 1945) is a retired American basketball player. He won two NCAA championships at UCLA, then played two seasons in the National Basketball Association.

Lynn, a 6'7 forward from Covina High School in Covina, California, played for UCLA from 1964 to 1968. He won a championship as a sophomore (1965) and again as a senior starter in 1968. Lynn was suspended for the 1966–67 championship year due to legal trouble concerning a credit card reported lost. He was a first-team All-AAWU pick as a junior in 1966.After his collegiate career ended, Lynn was drafted twice by the NBA – first in the 1967 NBA draft by the San Francisco Warriors (fifth round, #51 overall) and again in the 1968 NBA draft by the Chicago Bulls (fourth round, #39 overall). He played two NBA seasons from 1969 to 1971, his first for the Los Angeles Lakers and his second for the Buffalo Braves. For his career, Lynn averaged 2.6 points and 1.4 rebounds in 49 games.

Ron Williams (basketball)

Ronald Robert Williams (September 24, 1944 – April 4, 2004) was an American basketball player.

A 6'3" guard from Weirton, West Virginia, Williams starred at West Virginia University in the mid-1960s, where he was one of the school's first African American basketball players. He was selected by the San Francisco Warriors with the ninth pick of the 1968 NBA draft, and was also drafted as a defensive back by the Dallas Cowboys in the 14th round of the 1968 NFL Draft. He played eight seasons in the NBA as a member of the Warriors, the Milwaukee Bucks, and the Los Angeles Lakers. Williams averaged 9.3 points and 3.5 assists per game in his professional career and ranked third in the league in free throw percentage during the 1970–71 NBA season.After his playing career ended, Williams held several basketball coaching positions, including stints as an assistant coach at the University of California, Berkeley and Iona College. He died of a heart attack in 2004.

Shaler Halimon

Shaler Halimon, Jr. (born March 30, 1945) is a former American basketball player. He played five seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and American Basketball Association (ABA).

Halimon, a 6'5" swingman from Tampa, Florida, played college basketball at Imperial Valley Community College and Utah State University. Halimon averaged 25.1 points and 10.2 rebounds per game in his two seasons at Utah State.At the conclusion of his college career, Halimon was drafted by the Philadelphia 76ers in the first round of the 1968 NBA Draft (14th overall pick). He played in the NBA for the 76ers, Chicago Bulls, Portland Trail Blazers and Atlanta Hawks and for the Dallas Chaparrals of the ABA. He averaged 6.7 points and 3.4 rebounds per game in the NBA and 6.2 points and 3.1 rebounds in the ABA.In 1973, Halimon retired from the game. He worked first as a social worker in San Antonio, Texas, then as a bus driver in Tigard, Oregon, a suburb of Portland.

Skip Harlicka

Jules Peter "Skip" Harlicka (born October 14, 1946) is an American former NBA basketball player for the Atlanta Hawks.

Harlicka attended the University of South Carolina on a basketball scholarship, but also played baseball his freshmen year. During his college basketball career, Skip averaged 17.5 points per game on 47.5% shooting from the field. Skip was drafted with the 13th pick in the 1968 NBA Draft by the Atlanta Hawks. He played one season for the Hawks, appearing in 26 games while averaging 4.1 points per game and 1.4 assists per game.

Stu Lantz

Stuart Burrell Lantz (born July 13, 1946) is an American former basketball player who is a television commentator for the Los Angeles Lakers of the National Basketball Association (NBA) on Spectrum SportsNet. He has been the Lakers' color commentator since 1987, sharing the microphone with Chick Hearn, Paul Sunderland, Joel Meyers and now Bill Macdonald. Lantz has won numerous awards for his work along the way. The Southern California Sports Broadcasters Association has named Lantz best radio commentator in six of the last seven years.

Lantz played in the National Basketball Association from 1968 until 1976. He was drafted by the San Diego Rockets in the third round (1st Pick, 23rd Overall) of the 1968 NBA draft and by the Oakland Oaks in the 1968 ABA Draft after attending the University of Nebraska.

Wally Anderzunas

Walter Charles "Wally" Anderzunas (January 11, 1946 – May 28, 1989) was an American basketball player.

He attended high school in Omaha, Nebraska and collegiately for the Creighton University.

He was selected by the Detroit Pistons in the 6th round (70th pick overall) of the 1968 NBA draft and by the Atlanta Hawks in the 2nd round (25th pick overall) of the 1969 NBA draft.

He played for the Cincinnati Royals (1969–70) in the NBA for 44 games.

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