1968 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1968 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 39th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball.

The game was held on July 9, 1968, at the Astrodome in Houston, Texas the home of the Houston Astros of the National League, making this the first All-Star Game to be played indoors. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 1–0. It is the only All-Star Game ever played without a run batted in (RBI).

This was the first night All-Star Game since 1944. Apart from the 1969 game (which was originally scheduled to be played at night but was postponed to the following afternoon due to rain), all subsequent All-Star Games have been played at night.

1968 Major League Baseball All-Star Game
1968MLBAllStarGameLogo
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
American League 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1
National League 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 x 1 5 0
DateJuly 9, 1968
VenueHouston Astrodome
CityHouston, Texas
Managers
MVPWillie Mays (San Francisco Giants)
Attendance48,321
TelevisionNBC
TV announcersCurt Gowdy, Pee Wee Reese and Sandy Koufax
RadioNBC
Radio announcersJim Simpson, Tony Kubek and Gene Elston

Game summary

The American League was limited to three hits, unable to get a rally going against Don Drysdale, Juan Marichal, Steve Carlton and Tom Seaver, all future Hall of Famers.

A first-inning run scored by Willie Mays on a single, an errant pickoff attempt, a wild pitch by Luis Tiant and a double-play ball gave the winning National league the only run they would need.

Don Wert's eighth-inning double momentarily gave the AL a threat to tie the game, but Seaver struck out the side. In the ninth, with two out, Jerry Koosman was brought in from the bullpen to face Carl Yastrzemski, whose strikeout ended the game.

Line score

Line score

Tuesday, July 9, 1968 7:15 pm (CT) at Houston Astrodome in Houston, Texas
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
American League 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1
National League 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 X 1 5 0
WP: Don Drysdale (1-0)   LP: Luis Tiant (0-1)   Sv: Jerry Koosman

External links

1968 Detroit Tigers season

The 1968 Detroit Tigers won the 1968 World Series, defeating the St. Louis Cardinals four games to three. The 1968 baseball season, known as the "Year of the Pitcher", was the Detroit Tigers' 68th since they entered the American League in 1901, their eighth pennant, and third World Series championship. Detroit pitcher Denny McLain won the Cy Young Award and was named the American League's Most Valuable Player after winning 31 games. Mickey Lolich pitched three complete games in the World Series – and won all three – to win World Series MVP honors.

1968 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1968 Los Angeles Dodgers had a 76–86 record and finished in seventh place in the National League standings, 21 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals. After the season, the Dodgers underwent some changes among the team management when long time general manager Buzzie Bavasi resigned to take over the expansion San Diego Padres. He was replaced by team vice-president Fresco Thompson. However, Thompson was diagnosed with cancer weeks after taking the job and died in November. Al Campanis became the new general manager for the following season.

1968 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1968 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished eighth in the National League with a record of 76 wins and 86 losses, 21 games behind the NL pennant-winning Cardinals.

1969 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1969 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 40th midseason exhibition between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was played in the afternoon on Wednesday, July 23, at Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium in Washington, D.C. and resulted in a 9–3 victory for the National League. Steve Carlton was the winning pitcher while Mel Stottlemyre was the losing pitcher.The game was originally scheduled for the evening of Tuesday, July 22, but heavy rains forced its postponement to the following afternoon. The 1969 contest remains the last All-Star Game to date to be played earlier than prime time in the Eastern United States.

President Richard Nixon originally planned to attend the Tuesday night game and throw out the first ball, and then depart for the splashdown of Apollo 11 in the Pacific Ocean. But with the game's postponement until Wednesday afternoon, Nixon missed the game altogether and Vice President Spiro Agnew attended instead.

Cal Ermer

Calvin Coolidge Ermer (November 10, 1923 – August 8, 2009) was an American second baseman, manager, coach and scout in Major League Baseball. He was born in Baltimore, Maryland, the youngest of seven children, and served in the United States Marine Corps during World War II. As a player, Ermer, an infielder, threw and batted right-handed, stood 6 feet (1.8 m) tall and weighed 175 pounds (79 kg).

Jim Odom

James Cecil Odom (July 16, 1921 – January 18, 1989) was a professional baseball umpire who worked in the American League from 1965 to 1974. Odom umpired 1,597 major league games in his 10-year career. He umpired in the 1971 World Series, two League Championship Series (1970 and 1973) and the 1968 Major League Baseball All-Star Game.

Ron Reed

Ronald Lee Reed (born November 2, 1942) is a former two sport star who spent two seasons as a forward in the National Basketball Association before spending nearly two decades as a Major League Baseball pitcher.

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