1967 Wimbledon Championships

The 1967 Wimbledon Championships took place on the outdoor grass courts at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club in Wimbledon, London, United Kingdom. The tournament was held from Monday 26 June until Saturday 8 July 1967.[1] It was the 81st staging of the Wimbledon Championships, and the third Grand Slam tennis event of 1967. John Newcombe and Billie Jean King won the singles titles.

1967 Wimbledon Championships
Date26 June – 8 July
Edition81st
CategoryGrand Slam
SurfaceGrass
LocationChurch Road
SW19, Wimbledon,
London, United Kingdom
VenueAll England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club
Champions
Men's Singles
Australia John Newcombe
Women's Singles
United States Billie Jean King
Men's Doubles
South Africa Bob Hewitt / South Africa Frew McMillan
Women's Doubles
United States Rosie Casals / United States Billie Jean King
Mixed Doubles
Australia Owen Davidson / United States Billie Jean King
Boys' Singles
Spain Manuel Orantes
Girls' Singles
Netherlands Judith Salomé

Launch of colour television

The first colour television broadcast in the UK, as well as in Europe, took place on 1 July 1967, the first Saturday of the Championships, when, starting at 2pm, four hours of live coverage of the Championships was shown on BBC2 presented by David Vine and with commentary from Keith Fordyce.[2][3] The first match broadcast in colour was Cliff Drysdale against Roger Taylor and was played on the Centre Court. Additional colour broadcasts were made during the afternoons of the following week as well as 30 minute highlight programmes shown each evening.[4]

Champions

Seniors

Men's Singles

Australia John Newcombe defeated West Germany Wilhelm Bungert, 6–3, 6–1, 6–1 [5]

Women's Singles

United States Billie Jean King defeated United Kingdom Ann Jones, 6–3, 6–4 [6]

Men's Doubles

South Africa Bob Hewitt / South Africa Frew McMillan defeated Australia Roy Emerson / Australia Ken Fletcher, 6–2, 6–3, 6–4 [7]

Women's Doubles

United States Rosie Casals / United States Billie Jean King defeated Brazil Maria Bueno / United States Nancy Richey, 9–11, 6–4, 6–2 [8]

Mixed Doubles

Australia Owen Davidson / United States Billie Jean King defeated Australia Ken Fletcher / Brazil Maria Bueno, 7–5, 6–2 [9]

Juniors

Boys' Singles

Spain Manuel Orantes defeated United States Mike Estep, 6–2, 6–0 [10]

Girls' Singles

Netherlands Judith Salomé defeated Sweden Maria Strandberg, 6–4, 6–3 [11]j

See also

References

  1. ^ Little, Alan (2013). Wimbledon Compendium 2013 (23 ed.). London: All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club. p. 128. ISBN 978-1899039401.
  2. ^ "From the Observer archive, 25 June 1967: Wimbledon's Watchmen". The Guardian (Observer). 24 June 2012.
  3. ^ "Television: Colour Television in Britain" (pdf). www.nationalmediamuseum.org.uk. National Media Museum.
  4. ^ Little, Alan (2013). Wimbledon Compendium 2013 (23 ed.). London: All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club. pp. 72, 483–484. ISBN 978-1899039401.
  5. ^ "Gentlemen's Singles Finals 1877-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 22 July 2017.
  6. ^ "Ladies' Singles Finals 1884-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 22 July 2017.
  7. ^ "Gentlemen's Doubles Finals 1884-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 22 July 2017.
  8. ^ "Ladies' Doubles Finals 1913-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 22 July 2017.
  9. ^ "Mixed Doubles Finals 1913-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 22 July 2017.
  10. ^ "Boys' Singles Finals 1947-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 13 August 2017.
  11. ^ "Girls' Singles Finals 1947-2017". wimbledon.com. Wimbledon Championships. Retrieved 13 August 2017.

External links

Preceded by
1967 French Championships
Grand Slams Succeeded by
1967 U.S. National Championships
1967 French Championships (tennis)

The 1967 French Championships (now known as the French Open) was a tennis tournament that took place on the outdoor clay courts at the Stade Roland-Garros in Paris, France. The tournament ran from 22 May until 3 June. It was the 71st staging of the French Championships, and the second Grand Slam tennis event of 1967. It was also the last French Championships before the start of the Open Era in tennis. Roy Emerson and Françoise Dürr won the singles titles.

1967 French Championships – Women's Singles

Sixth-seeded Françoise Dürr defeated Lesley Turner 4–6, 6–3, 6–4 in the final to win the Women's Singles tennis title at the 1967 French Championships.

1967 U.S. National Championships (tennis)

The 1967 U.S. National Championships (now known as the US Open) was a tennis tournament that took place on the outdoor grass courts at the West Side Tennis Club, Forest Hills in New York, United States. The tournament ran from 30 August until 10 September. It was the 87th staging of the U.S. National Championships, and the fourth Grand Slam tennis event of 1967.

1967 Wimbledon Championships – Boys' Singles

Manuel Orantes defeated Mike Estep in the final, 6–2, 6–0 to win the Boys' Singles tennis title at the 1967 Wimbledon Championships.

1967 Wimbledon Championships – Girls' Singles

Judith Salomé defeated Maria Strandberg in the final, 6–4, 6–2 to win the Girls' Singles tennis title at the 1967 Wimbledon Championships.

1967 Wimbledon Championships – Men's Doubles

Ken Fletcher and John Newcombe were the defending champions, but decided not to compete together. Newcome partnered with Tony Roche but lost in the quarterfinals to Peter Curtis and Graham Stilwell.

Bob Hewitt and Frew McMillan defeated Fletcher and his partner Roy Emerson in the final, 6–2, 6–3, 6–4 to win the Gentlemen' Doubles tennis title at the 1967 Wimbledon Championship.

1967 Wimbledon Championships – Men's Singles

Manuel Santana was the defending champion, but lost in the first round to Charlie Pasarell.

John Newcombe defeated Wilhelm Bungert in the final, 6–3, 6–1, 6–1 to win the Gentlemen's Singles tennis title at the 1967 Wimbledon Championships.

1967 Wimbledon Championships – Mixed Doubles

Ken Fletcher and Margaret Smith were the defending champions, but Smith did not compete.f

Owen Davidson and Billie Jean King defeated Fletcher and Maria Bueno in the final, 7–5, 6–2 to win the Mixed Doubles tennis title at the 1967 Wimbledon Championships.

1967 Wimbledon Championships – Women's Doubles

Rosie Casals and Billie Jean King defeated the defending champions Maria Bueno and Nancy Richey in the final, 9–11, 6–4, 6–2 to win the Ladies' Doubles tennis title at the 1967 Wimbledon Championships.

1967 Wimbledon Championships – Women's Singles

Billie Jean King successfully defended her title, defeating Ann Jones in the final, 6–3, 6–4 to win the Ladies' Singles tennis title at the 1967 Wimbledon Championships.

1968 Wimbledon Championships

The 1968 Wimbledon Championships was a combined men's and women's tennis tournament that took place on the outdoor grass courts at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club in Wimbledon, London, United Kingdom. The tournament was held from Monday 24 June until Saturday 6 July 1968. It was the 82nd staging of the Wimbledon Championships, and the third Grand Slam tennis event of 1968.

This tournament started the Open Era for Wimbledon, as it became the second Grand Slam tournament to offer prize money and allow professionals to compete after the 1968 French Open. Singles champions Rod Laver and Billie Jean King had already won Wimbledon twice before in the amateur era.

1968 Wimbledon Championships – Boys' Singles

John Alexander defeated Jacques Thamin in the final, 6–1, 6–2 to win the Boys' Singles tennis title at the 1968 Wimbledon Championships.

1968 Wimbledon Championships – Girls' Singles

Kristy Pigeon defeated Lesley Hunt in the final, 6–4, 6–3 to win the Girls' Singles tennis title at the 1968 Wimbledon Championships.

1968 Wimbledon Championships – Women's Doubles

Rosemary Casals and Billie Jean King successfully defended their title, defeating Françoise Dürr and Ann Jones in the final, 3–6, 6–4, 7–5 to win the Ladies' Doubles tennis title at the 1968 Wimbledon Championships.

1968 Wimbledon Championships – Women's Singles

Billie Jean King was the two-time defending champion and successfully defended her title, defeating Judy Tegart in the final, 9–7, 7–5. This was King's second Grand Slam title of the year and her fifth overall.

Giordano Maioli

Giordano Maioli (born 27 September 1943), is an Italian former tennis player.

Hans-Joachim Plötz

Hans-Joachim "Hajo" Plötz (born 26 February 1944) is a former professional tennis player from Germany.

Stephanie DeFina

Stephanie DeFina Johnson (born March 8, 1946) is an American former amateur tennis player who was active in the 1960s and early 1970s.

DeFina was included in the year-end top ten rankings issued by the United States Lawn Tennis Association from 1966 through 1968, reaching a career high ranking of seventh in 1967.Her best singles result at a Grand Slam tournament was reaching the fourth round of the 1967 Wimbledon Championships in which she lost to Ann Jones.In 1966, she reached the final of the U.S. Women's Clay Court Championships before falling to Nancy Richey. In 1969, she was a doubles runner-up at the New England Women's Invitational Indoor Tennis Championships (teaming with Kathy Pigeon) and was the singles runner-up at the U.S. Indoor Championships.

At the tournament in Cincinnati, DeFina won two singles titles: in 1963 (defeating Jane "Peaches" Bartkowicz in the final) and 1965 (defeating Roberta Alison in the final). She also paired with Alison to win the Cincinnati doubles title in 1965.

In 1968 DeFina was a member of the U.S. team that competed for the Wightman Cup, the annual women's team tennis competition between the United States and Great Britain. She played the doubles match partnering Kathy Harter but lost to the sister team of Christine Truman Janes and Nell Truman.DeFina was a member of the 1974 World Team Tennis champion Denver Racquets.

Taghi Akbari

Taghi Akbari is a former tennis player from Iran.

Pre Open Era
Open Era
1967 in tennis
Grand Slam
National teams

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.