1967–68 FA Cup

The 1967–68 FA Cup was the 87th season of the world's oldest football cup competition, the Football Association Challenge Cup, commonly known as the FA Cup. West Bromwich Albion won the competition, beating Everton 1–0 after extra time in the final at Wembley, London.

Matches were played at the stadium of the team named first on the date specified for each round, which was always a Saturday. If the weather was inclement, a match may have been played at a different date to that originally planned. If scores were level after 90 minutes had been played, a replay would take place at the stadium of the second-named team later the same week. If the replayed match was drawn further replays would be held at neutral venues until a winner was determined. If scores were level after 90 minutes had been played in a replay, a 30-minute period of extra time would be played.

1967–68 FA Cup
Country England
 Wales
Defending championsTottenham Hotspur
ChampionsWest Bromwich Albion
(5th title)
Runners-upEverton

Calendar

Round Date
Preliminary Round Saturday 2 September 1967
First Round Qualifying Saturday 16 September 1967
Second Round Qualifying Saturday 30 September 1967
Third Round Qualifying Saturday 14 October 1967
Fourth Round Qualifying Saturday 28 October 1967
First Round Proper Saturday 9 December 1967
Second Round Proper Saturday 6 January 1968
Third Round Proper Saturday 27 January 1968
Fourth Round Proper Saturday 17 February 1968
Fifth Round Proper Saturday 9 March 1968
Sixth Round Proper Saturday 30 March 1968
Semi-Finals Saturday 27 April 1968
Final Saturday 18 May 1968

Results

First Round Proper

At this stage clubs from the Football League Third and Fourth Divisions joined those non-league clubs having come through the qualifying rounds. Matches were due to be played on Saturday, 9 December 1967, but snow and ice forced the postponement of 12 ties and the abandonment of two more, at Tow Law and Brentford.[1]

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date Attendance Notes
1 Chesterfield 2–0 Barnsley 9 December 1967
2 Bournemouth & Boscombe Athletic 2–0 Northampton Town 9 December 1967
3 Barrow 2–0 Oldham Athletic 9 December 1967
4 Grantham 1–3 Altrincham 9 December 1967
5 Weymouth 0–2 Orient 9 December 1967
6 Yeovil Town 1–3 Margate 13 December 1967 6,612 [2]
7 Reading 6–2 Aldershot 13 December 1967 14,750 [2]
8 Grimsby Town 1–1 Bradford Park Avenue 9 December 1967
Replay Bradford Park Avenue 4–1 Grimsby Town 11 December 1967 5,243 [2]
9 Luton Town 2–1 Oxford City 14 December 1967 13,394 [2]
10 Swindon Town 4–0 Salisbury 12 December 1967 12,193 [3]
11 Shrewsbury Town 3–0 Darlington 13 December 1967 7,294 [2]
12 Tranmere Rovers 5–1 Rochdale 9 December 1967
13 Stockport County 1–1 Macclesfield Town 9 December 1967
Replay Macclesfield Town 4–1 Stockport County 13 December 1967 8,944 [2]
14 Leytonstone 0–1 Walsall 9 December 1967
15 Brentford 2–2 Guildford City 14 December 1967 10,150 [1][2]
Replay Guildford City 2–1 Brentford 18 December 1967 7,289 [2]
16 Lowestoft Town 0–1 Watford 9 December 1967
17 Brighton & Hove Albion 1–0 Southend United 13 December 1967 12,296 [2]
18 Bradford City 7–1 Wrexham 9 December 1967
19 Wimbledon 3–0 Romford 9 December 1967
20 Goole Town 0–0 Spennymoor United 9 December 1967
Replay Spennymoor United 3–1 Goole Town 13 December 1967 3,900 [2]
21 Hartlepools United 2–3 Bury 9 December 1967 4,830 [4]
22 Scunthorpe United 2–0 Skelmersdale United 9 December 1967
23 Tow Law Town 5–1 Mansfield Town 13 December 1967 2,500 [1][2]
24 Port Vale 1–2 Chester 9 December 1967
25 Halifax Town 3–2 Crewe Alexandra 13 December 1967 6,816 [2]
26 Newport County 3–0 Gillingham 18 December 1967 2,452 [2]
27 Swansea Town 2–0 Enfield 18 December 1967 6,161 [2]
28 Southport 3–1 Lincoln City 9 December 1967
29 Runcorn 1–0 Notts County 9 December 1967
30 Torquay United 1–1 Colchester United 12 December 1967 6,655 [2]
Replay Colchester United 2–1 Torquay United 18 December 1967 7,079 [2]
31 Walthamstow Avenue 2–1 Kidderminster Harriers 9 December 1967
32 York City 0–1 Doncaster Rovers 9 December 1967
33 Hereford United 3–2 Barnet 13 December 1967 6,392 [2]
34 Peterborough United 5–2 Falmouth Town 11 December 1967 6,484 [5]
35 Chelmsford City 3–3 Oxford United 9 December 1967
Replay Oxford United 3–3 Chelmsford City 13 December 1967 8,902 [2]
2nd replay Chelmsford City 1–0 Oxford United 18 December 1967 4,350 [A][2]
36 Nuneaton Borough 0–0 Exeter City 9 December 1967
Replay Exeter City 0–0 Nuneaton Borough 13 December 1967 6,909 [2]
2nd replay Nuneaton Borough 0–1 Exeter City 18 December 1967 5,070 [B][2]
37 Corby Town 0–4 Boston United 9 December 1967
38 Dagenham 1–0 Tonbridge 9 December 1967
39 Ryhope Colliery Welfare 0–1 Workington 9 December 1967
40 Arnold 0–3 Bristol Rovers 9 December 1967

Second Round Proper

The matches were scheduled for Saturday, 6 January 1968, though the match at Tow Law was postponed due to bad weather. Four matches were drawn, with replays taking place as soon as conditions permitted.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date Attendance Notes
1 Chester 0–1 Chesterfield 6 January 1968
2 Watford 3–0 Hereford United 6 January 1968
3 Reading 1–1 Dagenham 6 January 1968
Replay Dagenham 0–1 Reading 15 January 1968 8,000 [2]
4 Macclesfield Town 2–0 Spennymoor United 6 January 1968
5 Swindon Town 3–2 Luton Town 6 January 1968 18,203 [3]
6 Doncaster Rovers 1–1 Workington 6 January 1968
Replay Workington 1–2 Doncaster Rovers 10 January 1968 4,740 [2]
7 Bradford City 2–3 Bury 6 January 1968
8 Wimbledon 0–4 Bristol Rovers 6 January 1968
9 Altrincham 1–2 Barrow 6 January 1968
10 Bradford Park Avenue 2–3 Tranmere Rovers 6 January 1968
11 Exeter City 1–3 Walsall 6 January 1968
12 Tow Law Town 1–1 Shrewsbury Town 15 January 1968 3,000 [2]
Replay Shrewsbury Town 6–2 Tow Law Town 18 January 1968 12,000 [2]
13 Halifax Town 1–0 Scunthorpe United 6 January 1968
14 Margate 0–4 Peterborough United 6 January 1968 7,366 [5]
15 Swansea Town 2–1 Brighton & Hove Albion 6 January 1968
16 Southport 4–2 Runcorn 6 January 1968
17 Walthamstow Avenue 1–3 Bournemouth & Boscombe Athletic 6 January 1968
18 Guildford City 0–1 Newport County 6 January 1968 8,774 [6]
19 Boston United 1–1 Orient 6 January 1968
Replay Orient 2–1 Boston United 15 January 1968 11,495 [2]
20 Chelmsford City 0–2 Colchester United 6 January 1968

Third Round Proper

The 44 First and Second Division clubs entered the competition at this stage. The matches were played on Saturday, 27 January 1968. Ten matches were drawn, with replays taking place later the same week, and one tie required a second replay.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date Attendance Notes
1 Blackpool 2–1 Chesterfield 27 January 1968
2 Bournemouth & Boscombe Athletic 0–0 Liverpool 27 January 1968 24,388 [7]
Replay Liverpool 4–1 Bournemouth & Boscombe Athletic 30 January 1968 54,075 [7]
3 Barrow 1–2 Leicester City 27 January 1968
4 Bristol City 0–0 Bristol Rovers 27 January 1968
Replay Bristol Rovers 1–2 Bristol City 30 January 1968 30,157 [2]
5 Burnley 1–3 West Ham United 27 January 1968 23,452 [8]
6 Southampton 1–1 Newport County 27 January 1968 23,789 [6]
Replay Newport County 2–3 Southampton 30 January 1968 20,000 [2]
7 Watford 0–1 Sheffield United 27 January 1968
8 Walsall 1–1 Crystal Palace 27 January 1968
Replay Crystal Palace 1–2 Walsall 31 January 1968 27,414 [2]
9 Nottingham Forest 4–2 Bolton Wanderers 27 January 1968
10 Aston Villa 3–0 Millwall 27 January 1968
11 Sheffield Wednesday 3–0 Plymouth Argyle 27 January 1968 29,283 [9]
12 Middlesbrough 1–1 Hull City 27 January 1968
Replay Hull City 2–2 Middlesbrough 31 January 1968 33,196 [2]
2nd replay Middlesbrough 1–0 Hull City 7 February 1968 20,000 [C][2]
13 Swindon Town 1–0 Blackburn Rovers 27 January 1968 20,830 [3]
14 Shrewsbury Town 1–1 Arsenal 27 January 1968
Replay Arsenal 2–0 Shrewsbury Town 30 January 1968 41,963 [2]
15 Doncaster Rovers 0–2 Swansea Town 27 January 1968
16 Tranmere Rovers 2–1 Huddersfield Town 27 January 1968 20,038
17 Newcastle United 0–1 Carlisle United 27 January 1968 56,569 [10]
18 Manchester City 0–0 Reading 27 January 1968 40,343 [11]
Replay Reading 0–7 Manchester City 31 January 1968 25,659 [11]
19 Queens Park Rangers 1–3 Preston North End 27 January 1968
20 Fulham 4–2 Macclesfield Town 27 January 1968
21 Coventry City 3–0 Charlton Athletic 27 January 1968
22 Manchester United 2–2 Tottenham Hotspur 27 January 1968 63,500 [12]
Replay Tottenham Hotspur 1–0 Manchester United 31 January 1968 57,200 [12]
23 Norwich City 1–1 Sunderland 27 January 1968 26,389 [13]
Replay Sunderland 0–1 Norwich City 31 January 1968 32,923 [13]
24 Chelsea 3–0 Ipswich Town 27 January 1968 42,986 [14]
25 Halifax Town 2–4 Birmingham City 27 January 1968 18,119 [15]
26 Southport 0–1 Everton 27 January 1968 18,795 [16]
27 Derby County 0-2 Leeds United 27 January 1968 39,753 [17]
28 Stoke City 4–1 Cardiff City 27 January 1968
29 Rotherham United 1–0 Wolverhampton Wanderers 27 January 1968
30 Peterborough United 0–1 Portsmouth 27 January 1968 16,907 [5]
31 Colchester United 1–1 West Bromwich Albion 27 January 1968 16,981
Replay West Bromwich Albion 4–0 Colchester United 31 January 1968 40,448 [2]
32 Orient 1–0 Bury 27 January 1968

Fourth Round Proper

The matches were played on Saturday, 17 February 1968. Six matches were drawn and replayed later the same week.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date Attendance Notes
1 Walsall 0–0 Liverpool 17 February 1968 21,066 [7]
Replay Liverpool 5–2 Walsall 19 February 1968 39,113 [7]
2 Aston Villa 0–1 Rotherham United 17 February 1968
3 Sheffield Wednesday 2–1 Swindon Town 17 February 1968 37,457 [9]
4 Middlesbrough 1–1 Bristol City 17 February 1968
Replay Bristol City 2–1 Middlesbrough 20 February 1968 21,771 [2]
5 West Bromwich Albion 1–1 Southampton 17 February 1968 32,987
Replay Southampton 2–3 West Bromwich Albion 21 February 1968 26,036 [2]
6 Sheffield United 2–1 Blackpool 17 February 1968
7 Tottenham Hotspur 3–1 Preston North End 17 February 1968 47,088 [12]
8 Manchester City 0–0 Leicester City 17 February 1968 51,009 [11]
Replay Leicester City 4–3 Manchester City 19 February 1968 39,112 [11]
9 Fulham 0–0 Portsmouth 17 February 1968
Replay Portsmouth 1–0 Fulham 21 February 1968 43,967 [2]
10 Coventry City 1–1 Tranmere Rovers 17 February 1968
Replay Tranmere Rovers 2–0 Coventry City 21 February 1968 24,000 [2]
11 Carlisle United 0–2 Everton 17 February 1968 25,000 [16]
12 Chelsea 1–0 Norwich City 17 February 1968
13 Swansea Town 0–1 Arsenal 17 February 1968
14 Leeds United 2–1 Nottingham Forest 17 February 1968 51,739 [17]
15 Stoke City 0–3 West Ham United 17 February 1968 36,704 [8]
16 Birmingham City 3–0 Orient 17 February 1968 29,320 [15]

Fifth Round Proper

The matches were played on Saturday, 9 March 1968. Four matches were drawn and replayed later the same week.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date Attendance Notes
1 Sheffield Wednesday 2–2 Chelsea 9 March 1968 49,186 [9]
Replay Chelsea 2–0 Sheffield Wednesday 12 March 1968 55,013 [9]
2 Everton 2–0 Tranmere Rovers 9 March 1968 61,982 [16]
3 Tottenham Hotspur 1–1 Liverpool 9 March 1968 54,005 [7]
Replay Liverpool 2–1 Tottenham Hotspur 12 March 1968 53,658 [7]
4 Portsmouth 1–2 West Bromwich Albion 9 March 1968 45,642
5 West Ham United 1–2 Sheffield United 9 March 1968 38,440 [8]
6 Arsenal 1–1 Birmingham City 9 March 1968 45,526 [15]
Replay Birmingham City 2–1 Arsenal 12 March 1968 51,586 [15]
7 Leeds United 2–0 Bristol City 9 March 1968 45,227 [17]
8 Rotherham United 1–1 Leicester City 9 March 1968
Replay Leicester City 2–0 Rotherham United 13 March 1968 41,856 [2]

Sixth Round Proper

Leicester City1–3Everton
Nish Husband Goal Goal
Kendall Goal
West Bromwich Albion0–0Liverpool
Leeds United1–0Sheffield United
Madeley Goal
Birmingham City1–0Chelsea
Pickering Goal
Replay
Liverpool1–1West Bromwich Albion
Hateley Goal 24' Astle Goal 70'
Second replay
West Bromwich Albion2–1Liverpool
Astle Goal
Clark Goal
Hateley Goal 59'

Semi-finals

West Bromwich Albion2–0Birmingham City
Astle Goal
Brown Goal
Everton1–0Leeds United
Morrissey Goal (pen)

Final

The final took place on Saturday, 18 May 1968 at Wembley and ended in a victory for West Bromwich Albion over Everton by 1–0 after extra time. The goal was scored by Jeff Astle, who scored in every round in which his team had played.[18] The attendance was 100,000.

West Bromwich Albion1–0Everton
Astle Goal 93' [18]
West Bromwich Albion
Everton

Notes

A. ^ : Match played at Griffin Park, London.
B. ^ : Match played at Ashton Gate, Bristol.
C. ^ : Match played at Bootham Crescent, York.

References

General
Specific
  1. ^ a b c Green, Geoffrey (1967-12-11). "Football review: Runcorn put out oldest club". The Times (Times Digital Archive 1785-1985). p. 11. Today's draw for the second round of the F. A. Cup will have a weather-beaten look. It will be peppered with alternatives since snow and ice caused 12 of Saturday's first round ties to be postponed and two others—at Tow Law and Brentford—to be abandoned after half-time
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al Attendance figure sourced from The Times via Times Digital Archive 1785-1985.
  3. ^ a b c "Season 1967-1968". Swindon-Town-FC.co.uk. Archived from the original on 15 April 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-21.
  4. ^ "1967-68 Season". POOLstats. Retrieved 2012-10-18.
  5. ^ a b c "1967/68". UpThePosh! The Peterborough United Database. Archived from the original on 9 May 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-26.
  6. ^ a b Ambrosen, Tony. Amber in the Blood: A History of Newport County F.C. ISBN 978-1-874427-40-7.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i "All the official games for the 1967-1968 season". lfchistory.net. Retrieved 2008-05-21.
  8. ^ a b c "1st Division 1967-68". westhamstats.info. Retrieved 2008-05-21.
  9. ^ a b c d "Season 1967-1968". The Sheffield Wednesday Archive. Adrian Bullock. Archived from the original on 25 June 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-21.
  10. ^ "Match report: 27/01/68 v Carlisle United". Toon1892. Kenneth H. Scott. Retrieved 2018-08-28.
  11. ^ a b c d "Season 1967-68". MCFC Stats. Archived from the original on 9 May 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-22.
  12. ^ a b c "Season 1967-1968". Topspurs. Jim Duggan. Archived from the original on 2008-05-02. Retrieved 2018-08-28.
  13. ^ a b "Season details 1967-68: Game by game". TheStatCat. Archived from the original on 2008-05-17. Retrieved 2018-08-28.
  14. ^ "Season: 1967-68 Division 2". Pride of Anglia. Retrieved 2008-05-21.
  15. ^ a b c d e f Matthews, Tony (1995). Birmingham City: A Complete Record. Derby: Breedon Books. p. 203. ISBN 978-1-85983-010-9.
  16. ^ a b c d "Everton Season Stats 1967-1968". Everton F.C. Retrieved 2008-05-22.
  17. ^ a b c d e "Leeds United: Season 1967 - 1968: Division One". leeds-fans.org.uk. Retrieved 2008-05-21.
  18. ^ a b "FA Cup Final 1968". fa-cupfinals.co.uk. Archived from the original on 24 May 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-21.
1967–68 Birmingham City F.C. season

The 1967–68 Football League season was Birmingham City Football Club's 65th in the Football League and their 27th in the Second Division. They finished in fourth position in the 22-team division. They entered the 1967–68 FA Cup in the third round proper, and defeated Arsenal (in a replay) and then Chelsea in front of crowds in excess of 50,000 to reach the semi-final, in which they lost 2–0 to local rivals West Bromwich Albion. They entered at the second round of the League Cup and lost in the third to Chelsea.

Twenty-two players made at least one appearance in nationally organised first-team competition, and there were eleven different goalscorers. Forwards Barry Bridges and Fred Pickering played in all 50 first-team matches over the season; midfielder Malcolm Beard missed only one. Bridges finished as leading goalscorer with 28 goals, of which 23 came in league competition.

1967–68 FA Cup qualifying rounds

The FA Cup 1967–68 is the 87th season of the world's oldest football knockout competition; The Football Association Challenge Cup, or FA Cup for short. The large number of clubs entering the tournament from lower down the English football league system meant that the competition started with a number of preliminary and qualifying rounds. The 30 victorious teams from the Fourth Round Qualifying progressed to the First Round Proper.

1968 FA Charity Shield

The 1968 FA Charity Shield was a football match played on 3 August 1968 between Football League champions Manchester City and FA Cup winners West Bromwich Albion. It was the 46th Charity Shield match and was played at City's home ground, Maine Road. Manchester City won 6–1.

The official match programme cost one shilling.

1968 FA Cup Final

The 1968 FA Cup Final was the 87th final of the FA Cup. It took place on 18 May 1968 at Wembley Stadium and was contested between West Bromwich Albion and Everton.

West Brom won 1–0 after extra time. Jeff Astle scored the winning goal, thus achieving the feat of scoring in every round of that season's competition. It was the fifth time that West Brom had won the FA Cup; they have not reached the final since.

This was the first FA Cup Final to be televised live in colour. Both teams wore their away strips, West Brom wearing white shirts and shorts with red socks, and Everton wearing gold shirts and blue shorts. This was also the first FA Cup Final in which a substitute was used, when West Brom's Dennis Clarke came on for an injured John Kaye.

The referee was Leo Callaghan from Merthyr Tydfil in South Wales.

Francis Lee

Francis Henry "Franny" Lee (born 29 April 1944 in Westhoughton, Lancashire, England) is a former professional footballer.

Lee played for Bolton Wanderers, Manchester City, Derby County and England. A fast forward, he won League Championship medals with Manchester City and Derby, and scored more than 200 goals in his career. In 2010, he was inducted into the English Football Hall of Fame.

He holds the English record for the greatest number of penalties scored in a season, a feat which earned him the nickname Lee Won Pen and led to accusations of diving. One such accusation, from Leeds United's Norman Hunter, led to an on-pitch fight.After retiring from football, Lee ran a successful toilet roll business, F.H. Lee Ltd, which made him a millionaire. In 1994, he became the major shareholder and chairman of Manchester City, but stepped down four years later.

History of Birmingham City F.C. (1965–present)

Businessman Clifford Coombs took over as Birmingham chairman in 1965, and appointed Stan Cullis as manager. Cullis's attractive football took them to cup semi-finals, but league football needed a different approach. Successor Freddie Goodwin produced a team playing skilful, aggressive football that won promotion to the First Division as well as reaching an FA Cup semi-final. Two years later, the club raised money by selling Bob Latchford to Everton for a British record fee of £350,000, but without his goals the team struggled. In 1979, with relegation a certainty, the club sold Trevor Francis to Nottingham Forest, making him the first British player transferred for a fee of £1 million; Francis had scored 133 goals in 329 appearances over his nine years at Birmingham. Jim Smith took Birmingham back to the top tier, but a poor start to the 1981–82 season saw him replaced by Ron Saunders of league champions Aston Villa. The team still lacked goals, and were relegated in 1984. The last home game of the 1984–85 promotion season was marred by rioting and the death of a boy when a wall collapsed; the events formed part of the remit of the Popplewell inquiry into safety at sports grounds. Saunders quit after FA Cup defeat to non-League team Altrincham, staff were laid off, the training ground was sold, and by 1989 Birmingham were in the Third Division for the first time in their history.

In April 1989 the Kumar brothers, owners of a clothing chain, bought 84% of the club. A rapid turnover of managers, the absence of promised investment, and a threatened mass refusal of players to renew contracts was relieved only by a victorious trip to Wembley in the Associate Members Cup. Terry Cooper delivered promotion, but a bank collapse put the Kumars' businesses into receivership. David Sullivan bought the club out of administration for £700,000 and installed the 23-year-old Karren Brady as managing director. They avoided relegation in 1992–93, but went down to the third tier in 1994. Barry Fry's first full season brought promotion as champions and victory in the Football League Trophy, beating Carlisle United via Paul Tait's golden goal.

The new owners had converted the stadium to all-seater, were to float the club as a plc, and saw Trevor Francis as the manager to take it forward. Francis introduced players with top-level experience, such as Manchester United captain Steve Bruce. They reached the 2001 League Cup final, losing on penalties to Liverpool, and three successive play-off semi-finals, losing all three, and lack of progress made Francis's position untenable. Bruce took the team from mid-table in November 2001 to the play-off final in which they beat Norwich City on penalties to win promotion to the Premier League. Motivated by World Cup-winner Christophe Dugarry, Birmingham's first top-flight season for 16 years finished in mid-table. Three years later, they were relegated in a season whose lowlight was a 7–0 FA Cup defeat at home to Liverpool. Bruce retained the confidence of the board and delivered automatic promotion in 2006–07.

In 2007, Carson Yeung invested in the club with a view to taking full control in the future. Uncertain as to his future under possible new owners, Bruce left in mid-season. His successor, Scotland national team manager Alex McLeish, was unable to stave off relegation, but achieved promotion back to the Premier League at the first attempt, and a ninth-place finish, their best for 51 years, the following season. Yeung completed a takeover, and the team won a second League Cup, defeating favourites Arsenal 2–1 with goals from Nikola Žigić and Obafemi Martins, but league form collapsed, they were relegated, and McLeish resigned. With the club in financial turmoil after Yeung's arrest on charges of money laundering, Chris Hughton's team narrowly failed to reach the knockout rounds of the Europa League and the playoff final before he too quit. Under Lee Clark, Birmingham twice retained their divisional status, albeit needing Paul Caddis's 93rd-minute goal in the last match of 2013–14 to avoid relegation on goal difference. Continued poor form saw Clark replaced by former Birmingham player Gary Rowett.

Joe Mercer

Joseph Mercer OBE (9 August 1914 – 9 August 1990) was an English football player and manager. Mercer, who played as a defender for Everton and Arsenal in his footballing career, also went on to be at the helm of Aston Villa, Manchester City and England as a manager.

Leytonstone F.C.

Leytonstone F.C. was an English football club based in Leytonstone, Greater London. Founded in 1886, the club ceased to exist in 1979 when it merged with Ilford to form Leytonstone-Ilford, which later became Redbridge Forest after also absorbing Walthamstow Avenue. Redbridge Forest in turn merged with Dagenham to form the modern Dagenham & Redbridge.

Mike Summerbee

Mike Summerbee (born 15 December 1942) is an English former footballer, who played in the successful Manchester City side of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Tommy Booth

Tommy Booth (born 9 November 1949) is an English former footballer who played in the Football League for Manchester City and Preston North End, and was capped four times for England at under-23 level.Booth was born in Middleton, Lancashire. He began his career with Manchester City, signing amateur forms in 1965, turning professional in 1967, and making his Football League debut on 9 October 1968 in a 1–1 draw at home to Arsenal. He played in the centre of defence, winning FA Cup, European Cup Winners' Cup and two League Cup winners' medals. He played 382 times for City in the League between 1968 and 1981, scoring 25 goals. In September 1981 he moved to Preston North End for £30,000. At Deepdale he made 84 appearances between 1981 and 1984, scoring twice, before injury forced him to retire during the 1984–85 season. In February 1985 he was appointed as Preston manager; with the club in difficult financial circumstances, he resigned in January 1986.

Tony Book

Anthony Keith Book is an English retired footballer and manager who was born in Bath, 4 September 1934. Book spent a large part of his career in Non-League football with his home town club Bath City, before entering league football with Plymouth Argyle. At the age of 31, he joined First Division Manchester City, where he became captain. Under Book's captaincy, Manchester City won four trophies, making him the most decorated Manchester City captain of all-time. Book had a five-year tenure as Manchester City manager from 1974 to 1979, and subsequently held various coaching roles at the club until 1996.

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