1964 Pro Bowl

The 1964 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 14th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1963 season. The game was played on January 12, 1964, at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California in front of a crowd of 67,242. The final score was West 31, East 17.[1]

The game featured Chicago Bears coach George Halas' first appearance as an all-star coach since the 1942 All-Star game which featured Halas' Bears against an all-league squad; it was also to be his final Pro Bowl appearance. Allie Sherman of the New York Giants was the coach of the East. Two Baltimore Colts swept the player of the game awards: Johnny Unitas was named "back of the game" (his third Pro Bowl MVP) and Gino Marchetti won "lineman of the game" honors. Marchetti presented the game ball to Halas.

1964 East–West Pro Bowl
Eastern Conference Western Conference
17 31
Head coach:
Allie Sherman
(New York Giants)
Head coach:
George Halas
(Chicago Bears)
1234 Total
Eastern Conference 30014 17
Western Conference 77143 31
DateJanuary 12, 1964
StadiumMemorial Coliseum, Los Angeles, California
Co-MVPsJohnny Unitas (Baltimore Colts), Gino Marchetti (Baltimore Colts)
Attendance67,242
TV in the United States
NetworkNBC
AnnouncersChris Schenkel, George Connor

References

  1. ^ "West hands East 37–17 loss in Pro Bowl". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. AP. January 13, 1964. pp. 22, 24. Retrieved January 20, 2012.

External links

1965 Pro Bowl

The 1965 Pro Bowl was the NFL's fifteenth annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1964 season. The game was played on January 10, 1965, at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California in front of 60,698. The coaches for the game were Don Shula of Baltimore Colts for the West and Blanton Collier of Cleveland Browns for the East. The West team won by a final score was 34–14.The West dominated the East, 411 to 187 in total yards. West quarterback Fran Tarkenton of the Minnesota Vikings was named "Back of the Game" after he completed 8 of 13 passes for 172 yards. At one point during the game, the West backfield was all-Vikings: Tarkenton (No. 10), Tommy Mason (No. 20), and Bill Brown (No. 30).

"Lineman of the Game" honors went to the West’s Terry Barr of the Detroit Lions; Barr had 106 yards receiving on three receptions.Frank Ryan, the quarterback of the Cleveland Browns' who had defeated the Baltimore Colts in the 1964 NFL Championship Game, was knocked out of the Pro Bowl when he was sacked in the third quarter by a group of defenders including the Colts' Gino Marchetti. Some thought that Marchetti, who was playing in his tenth Pro Bowl, was trying to teach Ryan a lesson for considering running up the score against the Colts in the championship game. Marchetti denied this, and he and Ryan remained on good terms.

Bob Kelley

Robert J. "Bob" Kelley was born May 17, 1917, in Kalamazoo, Michigan, and died September 9, 1966, in Los Angeles. He was an American sportscaster, best known as the radio play-by-play announcer for the Rams pro football team from that NFL franchise's inception in 1937 in Cleveland, after its move to Los Angeles in 1946, and through 1965.After graduation from high school, Kelley got a job announcing the football games of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish. He became director of sports for radio station WGAR in Cleveland and began calling Ram games. In 1942 he joined radio station WJR in Detroit where he broadcast the games of the Michigan Wolverines, while commuting back to Cleveland on Sundays to do the Rams' games.In addition to broadcasting Rams games, Kelley was the regular baseball announcer for the Los Angeles Angels of the Pacific Coast League from 1948 to 1957 and the Los Angeles Angels of the American League in 1961, and had an evening sports show on radio station KMPC.

Kelley, who was known as "The Voice of the Rams", attended high school in Elkhart, Indiana, and was a 1942 graduate of Western Reserve University. He had several minor film roles, playing a sports announcer. His son Patrick, who was known as Paraquat Kelley, pursued a broadcasting career and is best known as a newscaster at KMET-FM in Los Angeles during the 1970s and '80s.Kelley was always controversial, especially due to his nightly radio show. According to Jim Murray, the show "made as many people gnash their teeth as cheer. But they listened. His mail was sulphuric. But they wrote... Even when I didn't agree with a bloody word he said I was entertained by the way Bob Kelley said it."Kelley suffered a heart attack at the Coliseum January 12, 1964, during the 1964 Pro Bowl game. He was released from the hospital within ten days, but suffered another heart attack on August 10, 1966. He never regained consciousness, and died on September 9, two days before the Rams' first regular-season game of the year. Dick Enberg, who'd been named as Kelley's partner on Rams broadcasts that season, succeeded him as the team's lead announcer.Bob Kelley is buried in San Fernando Mission Cemetery.

Dick Modzelewski

Richard Blair Modzelewski (February 16, 1931 – October 19, 2018) was an American football defensive tackle in the National Football League for the Washington Redskins, Pittsburgh Steelers, New York Giants, and the Cleveland Browns. He also served as interim head coach of the Browns in the final game of the 1977 season. Modzelewski was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1993.

Ernie Kellerman

Ernie James Kellerman (also Kellermann) (born December 17, 1943) is a former American football safety in the National Football League (NFL) for the Cleveland Browns, Cincinnati Bengals and the Buffalo Bills. He played college football at Miami University.

Jake Kupp

Jacob Ralph Kupp (born March 12, 1941) is a former American football guard in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys, Washington Redskins, Atlanta Falcons and New Orleans Saints. He played college football at the University of Washington.

List of Arkansas Razorbacks in the NFL draft

The National Football League (NFL) have drafted 269 players who had played for the University of Arkansas Razorbacks since the league began holding drafts in 1936. The Razorbacks' highest draft position was second overall in 1954, when Lamar McHan was selected by the Chicago Cardinals. Arkansas' first drafted player in the NFL was Jack Robbins, who was the fifth overall pick by the Chicago Cardinals in 1938. Five former players were selected from the latest NFL draft: Trey Flowers, Martrell Spaight, Tevin Mitchel, Darius Philon, and A.J. Derby.

Each NFL franchise seeks to add new players through the annual NFL draft. The team with the worst record the previous year picks first, the next-worst team second, and so on. Teams that did not make the playoffs are ordered by their regular-season record, with any remaining ties broken by strength of schedule. Playoff participants are sequenced after non-playoff teams, based on their round of elimination (wild card, division, conference, and Super Bowl).Before the AFL–NFL merger agreements in 1966, the American Football League (AFL) operated in direct competition with the NFL and held a separate draft. This led to a massive bidding war over top prospects between the two leagues. As part of the merger agreement on June 8, 1966, the two leagues would hold a multiple round "Common Draft". Once the AFL officially merged with the NFL in 1970, the "common draft" simply became the NFL draft.

List of Kansas Jayhawks in the NFL Draft

The University of Kansas Jayhawks football team has had 175 players drafted into the National Football League (NFL) since the first draft held in 1936, through the 2018 NFL Draft. KU has seen nine players taken in the first round, including six top-10 picks: Gale Sayers, John Riggins, Ray Evans, Mike Butler, John Hadl, and David Verser. Sayers, a College and Pro Football Hall of Famer, was the highest pick from KU as the fourth overall pick in the 1965 NFL Draft.

Through the annual NFL Draft each NFL franchise gets the chance to add new players to their teams. The current draft rules were established in 2009. The team with the worst record the previous year gets to pick first, then the next-worst team picks second, and so on. Teams that were not in the playoffs receive their draft order by their regular-season record. If 2 or more non-playoff teams have the same record the tie breaker used is their strength of schedule. Playoff teams receive their draft order after all the non-playoff teams, based on their round of elimination (wild card, division, conference, and Super Bowl).In 1944 the All-America Football Conference was established and it began play in 1946 in direct competition with the NFL. From 1946 to 1949 the two leagues fiercely competed for the top college football prospects with each league holding their own drafts, before the AAFC finally merged with the NFL at the end of the 1949 season.

Like the AAFC earlier, the American Football League (AFL) operated in direct competition with the NFL and held a separate draft. This led to a massive bidding war over top prospects between the two leagues. As part of the merger agreement on June 8, 1966, the two leagues would hold a multiple round "Common Draft". Once the AFL officially merged with the NFL in 1970, the "Common Draft" simply became the NFL Draft.Sixteen former Jayhawks who were drafted have been selected to a Pro Bowl or AFL All-Star Game. Twelve former Jayhawks who were drafted have won a championship with their respective teams, one was named MVP, John Riggins in Super Bowl XVII.

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