1964 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1964 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 35th midseason exhibition between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was played on July 7, 1964, at Shea Stadium in New York City, New York, home of the New York Mets of the National League. The game was a 7–4 victory for the NL. Johnny Callison hit a walk-off home run, the most recent MLB All-Star game to end in such a fashion.

1964 Major League Baseball All-Star Game
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
American League 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0  0 4 9 1
National League 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 4x 7 8 0
DateJuly 7, 1964
VenueShea Stadium
CityQueens, New York
Managers
MVPJohnny Callison (PHI)
Attendance50,850
TelevisionNBC
TV announcersLindsey Nelson and Buddy Blattner
RadioNBC
Radio announcersBlaine Walsh and Dan Daniels

Game summary

National League starter Don Drysdale gave up a leadoff single to Jim Fregosi, who scored on a passed ball and single by Harmon Killebrew.

The NL took the lead in the fourth on a pair of home runs by Billy Williams and Ken Boyer off AL reliever John Wyatt, then made it 3–1 in the fifth on a Roberto Clemente single and Dick Groat double off Camilo Pascual.

The score was tied in the sixth when Mickey Mantle and Killebrew singled and scored on a Brooks Robinson triple to right-center. The AL regained the lead 4–3 in the seventh. Elston Howard was hit by a pitch by Turk Farrell, took third on a Rocky Colavito double and scored on Fregosi's sacrifice fly.

It remained 4–3 until the bottom of the ninth. Dick Radatz issued a leadoff walk to Willie Mays, who stole second. Orlando Cepeda singled him home with the tying run and took second on an error. With Curt Flood pinch-running for Cepeda and Johnny Edwards on first with an intentional walk, Johnny Callison's three-run homer to deep right field ended the game.

Roster

Players in italics have since been inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

American League

Starters
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Dean Chance Angels 1
C Elston Howard Yankees 11
1B Bob Allison Twins 3
2B Bobby Richardson Yankees 6
3B Brooks Robinson Orioles 8
SS Jim Fregosi Angels 1
OF Harmon Killebrew Twins 6
OF Mickey Mantle Yankees 17
OF Tony Oliva Twins 1
Pitchers
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Whitey Ford Yankees 10
P Jack Kralick Indians 1
P Camilo Pascual Twins 7
P Gary Peters White Sox 1
P Juan Pizarro White Sox 2
P Dick Radatz Red Sox 2
P John Wyatt Athletics 1
Reserves
Position Player Team All-Star Games
C Bill Freehan Tigers 1
1B Joe Pepitone Yankees 2
1B Norm Siebern Athletics 4
2B Jerry Lumpe Tigers 1
3B Frank Malzone Red Sox 8
SS Luis Aparicio-x Orioles 10
SS Eddie Bressoud-y Red Sox 1
OF Rocky Colavito-y Tigers 7
OF Jimmie Hall Twins 1
OF Chuck Hinton Senators 1
OF Al Kaline-x Tigers 13

National League

Starters
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Don Drysdale Dodgers 6
C Joe Torre Braves 2
1B Orlando Cepeda Giants 10
2B Ron Hunt Mets 1
3B Ken Boyer Cardinals 11
SS Dick Groat Cardinals 8
OF Roberto Clemente Pirates 8
OF Willie Mays Giants 15
OF Billy Williams Cubs 2
Pitchers
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Jim Bunning Phillies 8
P Dick Ellsworth Cubs 2
P Turk Farrell Colt .45s 4
P Sandy Koufax Dodgers 5
P Juan Marichal Giants 4
P Chris Short Phillies 1
Reserves
Position Player Team All-Star Games
C Smoky Burgess Pirates 9
C Johnny Edwards Reds 2
1B Bill White Cardinals 8
2B Bill Mazeroski Pirates 9
3B Ron Santo Cubs 2
SS Leo Cárdenas Reds 1
OF Hank Aaron Braves 14
OF Johnny Callison Phillies 3
OF Curt Flood Cardinals 1
OF Willie Stargell Pirates 1

x – replaced due to injury

y – replacement for injured player

Game

Starting lineups

American League National League
Order Player Team Position Order Player Team Position
1 Jim Fregosi Angels SS 1 Roberto Clemente Pirates RF
2 Tony Oliva Twins RF 2 Dick Groat Cardinals SS
3 Mickey Mantle Yankees CF 3 Billy Williams Cubs LF
4 Harmon Killebrew Twins LF 4 Willie Mays Giants CF
5 Bob Allison Twins 1B 5 Orlando Cepeda Giants 1B
6 Brooks Robinson Orioles 3B 6 Ken Boyer Cardinals 3B
7 Bobby Richardson Yankees 2B 7 Joe Torre Braves C
8 Elston Howard Yankees C 8 Ron Hunt Mets 2B
9 Dean Chance Angels P 9 Don Drysdale Dodgers P

Umpires

Position Umpire
Home Plate Ed Sudol (NL)
First Base Joe Paparella (AL)
Second Base Frank Secory (NL)
Third Base Nestor Chylak (AL)
Left Field Doug Harvey (NL)
Right Field Al Salerno (AL)

Line score

Tuesday, July 7, 1964 1:00 pm (ET) at Shea Stadium in Queens, New York
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
American League 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 4 9 1
National League 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 4x 7 8 0
WP: Juan Marichal (1–0)   LP: Dick Radatz (0–1)
Home runs:
AL: None
NL: Billy Williams (1), Ken Boyer (1), Johnny Callison (1)

External links

1964 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1964 Los Angeles Dodgers finished with a record of 80–82, 13 games behind the National League and World Series Champion St. Louis Cardinals, tied for sixth place with the Pittsburgh Pirates.

1964 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1964 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 82nd season for the franchise in Philadelphia. The Phillies finished in a second-place tie with the Cincinnati Reds. Both posted a record of 92–70, finishing one game behind the National League (NL) and World Series champion St. Louis Cardinals, and just two games ahead of fourth-place San Francisco. Gene Mauch managed the Phillies, who played their home games at Connie Mack Stadium.

The team is notable for being in first place in the National League since the opening day, and then suffering a drastic collapse during the final two weeks of the season. The "Phold of '64", as it became known, is one of the most infamous collapses in baseball history.

1965 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1965 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 36th midseason exhibition between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was played on July 13, 1965, at Metropolitan Stadium in Bloomington, Minnesota. The game resulted in a 6–5 victory for the NL.

2007 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 2007 throughout the world.

Al Salerno

Alexander Joseph Salerno (March 19, 1931 – August 5, 2007) was a professional baseball umpire who worked in the American League from 1961 to 1968. Salerno worked as the right field umpire in the 1964 Major League Baseball All-Star Game. In his career, he umpired 1,110 Major League games.

Dick Radatz

Richard Raymond Radatz (April 2, 1937 – March 16, 2005) was an American relief pitcher in Major League Baseball. Nicknamed "The Monster", the 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m), 230 lb (100 kg) right-hander had a scorching but short-lived period of dominance for the Boston Red Sox in the early sixties. He got his nickname by striking out several New York Yankees in a row at a game in Fenway Park in 1963. Mickey Mantle, who was struck out by Radatz 12 times in his 16 career at bats against the pitcher, was heard calling him "that monster", and the name stuck.

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