1963 World Series

The 1963 World Series matched the two-time defending champion New York Yankees against the Los Angeles Dodgers, with the Dodgers sweeping the Series in four games to capture their second title in five years, and their third in franchise history. Starting pitchers Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale, and Johnny Podres, and ace reliever Ron Perranoski combined to give up only four runs in four games. The dominance of the Dodgers pitchers was so complete that at no point in any of the four games did the Yankees have the lead. New York was held to a .171 team batting average, the lowest ever for the Yankees in the post-season.

This was the first time that the Yankees were swept in a World Series in four staight (the 1922 World Series had one tie).

Of the Los Angeles Dodgers four World Series championships since the opening of Dodger Stadium, this was the only one won at Dodger Stadium. Also, of the six championships from the Dodgers franchise, it remains the only one won at home.

This series was also the first meeting between teams from New York City and Los Angeles for a major professional sports championship.[1][2] Seven more such meetings have followed with three more times each in the World Series and the NBA Finals, and the 2014 Stanley Cup Final.[2]

1963 World Series
Team (Wins) Manager(s) Season
Los Angeles Dodgers (4) Walter Alston 99–63, .611, GA: 6
New York Yankees (0) Ralph Houk 104–57, .646, GA: 10½
DatesOctober 2–6
MVPSandy Koufax (Los Angeles)
UmpiresJoe Paparella (AL), Tom Gorman (NL), Larry Napp (AL), Shag Crawford (NL), Johnny Rice (AL: outfield only), Tony Venzon (NL: outfield only)
Hall of FamersDodgers: Walt Alston (mgr.), Leo Durocher (Coach), Don Drysdale, Sandy Koufax.
Yankees: Yogi Berra, Whitey Ford, Mickey Mantle.
Broadcast
TelevisionNBC
TV announcersMel Allen and Vin Scully
RadioNBC
Radio announcersErnie Harwell and Joe Garagiola
World Series

Background

Yankees

Despite injuries that limited Mickey Mantle to just 65 games, the Yankees went 104–57 to win their fourth straight American League pennant—this one by ​10 12 games. Catcher Elston Howard (.287 BA, 28 HRs, 85 RBI) won the MVP Award, while Joe Pepitone, Roger Maris, and Tom Tresh also topped the 20 home run mark. Their pitching was anchored by Whitey Ford (24 wins, 2.74 ERA) and Jim Bouton (21 wins, 2.53 ERA).

Dodgers

The Dodgers' road to the World Series was much more challenging. After blowing a four-game lead with seven to play in 1962, the Dodgers again built a lead in 1963. On August 21, the Dodgers beat the Cardinals 2–1 in 16 innings to take a ​7 12 game lead. When they went to St. Louis for a three-game series on September 16, their lead was one game over the Cardinals, who had won 19 of 20 games. Sports fans around the country were saying how the Dodgers were going to blow it again. But the Dodgers swept the three games from the Cardinals to move four games ahead with nine to play; a 4–1 win over the Mets clinched the pennant in the season's 158th game.

Summary

NL Los Angeles Dodgers (4) vs. AL New York Yankees (0)

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance 
1 October 2 Los Angeles Dodgers – 5, New York Yankees – 2 Yankee Stadium 2:09 69,000[3] 
2 October 3 Los Angeles Dodgers – 4, New York Yankees – 1 Yankee Stadium 2:13 66,455[4] 
3 October 5 New York Yankees – 0, Los Angeles Dodgers – 1 Dodger Stadium 2:05 55,912[5] 
4 October 6 New York Yankees – 1, Los Angeles Dodgers – 2 Dodger Stadium 1:50 55,912[6]

Matchups

Game 1

Wednesday, October 2, 1963 1:00 pm (ET) at Yankee Stadium in Bronx, New York
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Los Angeles 0 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 9 0
New York 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 6 0
WP: Sandy Koufax (1–0)   LP: Whitey Ford (0–1)
Home runs:
LAD: Johnny Roseboro (1)
NYY: Tom Tresh (1)
Sandy Koufax
Hall of Famer Sandy Koufax

Sandy Koufax started it off with a then record fifteen-strikeout performance in Game 1. It bested fellow Dodgers pitcher Carl Erskine's mark in 1953 by one, and would be surpassed by Bob Gibson in 1968. Koufax also tied a World Series record when he fanned the first five Yankee batters he faced in that game. Since "K" is the time-honored scoring symbol for "strikeout" (Vin Scully once remarked that "Koufax's name will always remind you of strikeouts"), some newspapers' headlines for the game coverage consisted simply of Koufax's surname prefixed by fifteen K's.

Clete Boyer was the only Yankee regular not to be struck out against Koufax. Mickey Mantle, Tom Tresh and Tony Kubek were struck out twice each, and Bobby Richardson was struck out three times—his only three-strikeout game in 1448 regular season/World Series games. (Just that regular season, Richardson had been struck out only 22 times in 630 at-bats, without even being struck out twice in one game.) Koufax also struck out three pinch-hitters, including Harry Bright to end the game. The only offense the Yankees managed was a two-run shot by Tom Tresh in the eighth.

The Dodger 4-run outburst in the second inning was started by a monster double by Frank Howard into the Death Valley section of left center field in old Yankee Stadium. Bill Skowron singled him in and after Dick Tracewski singled to put two men on, catcher John Roseboro launched a three-run home run off Whitey Ford. Skowron would single in Willie Davis in the third and all five runs were charged to the ineffective Ford, who went just five innings.[7]

Game 2

Thursday, October 3, 1963 1:00 pm (ET) at Yankee Stadium in Bronx, New York
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Los Angeles 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 4 10 1
New York 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 7 0
WP: Johnny Podres (1–0)   LP: Al Downing (0–1)   Sv: Ron Perranoski (1)
Home runs:
LAD: Bill Skowron (1)
NYY: None

Willie Davis doubled in two runs in the first inning, former Yankee Bill Skowron homered in the fourth, and Tommy Davis had two triples, including an RBI triple in the eighth to lead the Dodger offense. Yankee starter Al Downing, who would take the loss, went only five innings and charged with three runs. Ralph Terry, in relief, allowed Davis's RBI triple. Dodger manager Walt Alston went with #3 starter Johnny Podres over #2 starter Don Drysdale because he was left-handed and Yankee Stadium was favorable to left-handed pitchers. Podres delivered a six-hitter through ​8 13 innings; ace reliever Ron Perranoski, also a left-hander, got the last two outs and the save, and the Dodgers headed home with 2–0 Series lead.

Game 3

Saturday, October 5, 1963 1:00 pm (PT) at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
Los Angeles 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 X 1 4 1
WP: Don Drysdale (1–0)   LP: Jim Bouton (0–1)

Don Drysdale pitched a masterful three-hitter at Dodger Stadium in his complete-game win. Manager Walter Alston called Drysdale's performance "one of the greatest pitched games I ever saw." Jim Bouton, making his first World Series start, dueled Drysdale throughout, permitting only four hits in seven innings for a losing cause. The lone Dodger run came in the bottom of the first on a Jim Gilliam walk, a wild pitch and a single by Tommy Davis. Gilliam almost scored again in the eighth off Hal Reniff, but was caught in an attempt to steal third. The final out came on Joe Pepitone's drive that backed Dodger right fielder Ron Fairly up against the bullpen gate to make the catch of a ball that would have been a home run in Yankee Stadium. Tony Kubek had two of the Yankees' three hits, but none of the hits were extra-base hits.

Game 4

Sunday, October 6, 1963 1:00 pm (PT) at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 6 1
Los Angeles 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 X 2 2 1
WP: Sandy Koufax (2–0)   LP: Whitey Ford (0–2)
Home runs:
NYY: Mickey Mantle (1)
LAD: Frank Howard (1)

Aces were on the mound again in a game 1 rematch between Whitey Ford and Sandy Koufax. This time, it was a pitcher's duel. The Dodgers scored first in the bottom of the fifth on a monumental Frank Howard home run into the upper deck at Dodger Stadium. The Yankees tied it on a Mickey Mantle home run in the top of the seventh. But in the bottom of the inning, Gilliam hit a high hopper to Yankee third baseman Clete Boyer; Boyer leaped to make the grab, and fired an accurate throw to first base. But first baseman Joe Pepitone lost Boyer's peg in the white-shirted crowd background; the ball struck Pepitone in the arm and rolled down the right field line, allowing Gilliam to scamper all the way to third base. He then scored a moment later on Willie Davis' sacrifice fly. Sandy Koufax went on to hold the Yankees for the final two innings for a 2–1 victory and the Dodgers' third world championship.

The World Series Most Valuable Player Award went to Sandy Koufax, who started two of the four games and had two complete game victories. To date, Game 4 is the only time the Dodgers have won the deciding game of a World Series at home.

Composite box

1963 World Series (4–0): Los Angeles Dodgers (N.L.) over New York Yankees (A.L.)

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Los Angeles Dodgers 3 4 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 12 25 3
New York Yankees 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 4 22 1
Total attendance: 247,279   Average attendance: 61,820
Winning player's share: $12,794   Losing player's share: $7,874[8]

Low scoring

World Series Teams With Fewer Than Ten (10) Runs Scored (Through 1963):

Year Team League Runs
1954 Cleveland Indians A.L. 9
1943 St. Louis Cardinals N.L. 9
1938 Chicago Cubs N.L. 9
1918 Boston Red Sox A.L. 9
1939 Cincinnati Reds N.L. 8
1920 Brooklyn Dodgers N.L. 8
1914 Philadelphia Athletics A.L. 6
1907 Detroit Tigers A.L. 6
1950 Philadelphia Phillies N.L. 5
1963 New York Yankees A.L. 4
1905 Philadelphia Athletics A.L. 3

Trivia

  • This was longtime Yankees announcer Mel Allen's 22nd and final World Series broadcast. Allen was suffering from an attack of severe laryngitis at the time of the Series, and while doing play-by-play for NBC television during Game 4 his voice gave out completely in the bottom of the eighth inning, requiring Vin Scully to take over for the remainder of the game. (The following year—Allen's last with the Yankees—he would be passed over for the Series assignment in favor of boothmate Phil Rizzuto.)
  • Yankee pinch hitter Harry Bright was Koufax's record setting 15th strikeout for the final out in Game 1.
  • The MVP award was given to Koufax at a luncheon in New York City. He was presented with a new car. While the luncheon was taking place, a New York City police officer put a parking violation ticket on the car's windshield.[9]

In popular culture

  • In the 1986 novel Replay by Ken Grimwood, the protagonist bets his life savings on a Dodgers sweep, knowing they will win. His winnings total more than 12 million dollars, at the apparent odds of 100–1, with Grimwood referring to it as "one of the great upsets in baseball history".
  • This is the World Series that Jack Nicholson's character R.P. McMurphy lobbies unsuccessfully to watch on television (and subsequently "announces" by imagining the action) in Miloš Forman's 1975 film One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. He imagines quite a different scene than what occurred, however, as he describes Richardson, Tresh, and Mantle knocking Koufax out of the box. In reality, the Yankees never led at any time in the Series, and only once in the entire Series (and that only for a half-inning) were the Yankees and Dodgers tied at a score other than 0–0. A brief clip of Ernie Harwell's NBC Radio broadcast of Game 2 can be heard in the film.

Notes

  1. ^ Branch, John (June 5, 2014). "New York vs. Los Angeles: Rivalry Revived". The New York Times. p. B11.
  2. ^ a b Barnes, Mike (June 1, 2014). "Stanley Cup Final: Kings vs. Rangers in L.A.-New York Championship Duel". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved May 15, 2015.
  3. ^ "1963 World Series Game 1 – Los Angeles Dodgers vs. New York Yankees". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  4. ^ "1963 World Series Game 2 – Los Angeles Dodgers vs. New York Yankees". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  5. ^ "1963 World Series Game 3 – New York Yankees vs. Los Angeles Dodgers". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  6. ^ "1963 World Series Game 4 – New York Yankees vs. Los Angeles Dodgers". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  7. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/NYA/NYA196310020.shtml
  8. ^ "World Series Gate Receipts and Player Shares". Baseball Almanac. Archived from the original on May 2, 2009. Retrieved June 14, 2009.
  9. ^ New York cop seeks revenge

See also

References

  • Cohen, Richard M.; Neft, David S. (1990). The World Series: Complete Play-By-Play of Every Game, 1903–1989. New York: St. Martin's Press. pp. 298–301. ISBN 0-312-03960-3.
  • Reichler, Joseph (1982). The Baseball Encyclopedia (5th ed.). Macmillan Publishing. p. 2171. ISBN 0-02-579010-2.
  • Forman, Sean L. "1963 World Series". Baseball-Reference.com – Major League Statistics and Information. Archived from the original on November 30, 2007. Retrieved December 9, 2007.

External links

1963 Japan Series

The 1963 Japan Series was the Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB) championship series for the 1963 season. It was the 14th Japan Series and featured the Pacific League champions, the Nishitetsu Lions, against the Central League champions, the Yomiuri Giants.

1963 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1963 Los Angeles Dodgers were led by pitcher Sandy Koufax, who won both the Cy Young Award and the Most Valuable Player Award. The team went 99–63 to win the National League title by six games over the runner-up St. Louis Cardinals and beat the New York Yankees in four games to win the 1963 World Series, marking the first time that the Yankees were ever swept in the postseason.

1963 New York Yankees season

The 1963 New York Yankees season was the 61st season for the team in New York, and its 63rd season overall. The team finished with a record of 104–57, winning their 28th pennant, finishing 10½ games ahead of the Chicago White Sox. New York was managed by Ralph Houk.

The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they were defeated by the Los Angeles Dodgers in 4 games, the first time the Yankees had ever been swept in the World Series (they had lost 4 games to none with one tied game in 1922).

Al Downing (baseball)

Alphonso Erwin Downing (born June 28, 1941) is an American former professional baseball pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball for New York Yankees, Oakland Athletics, Milwaukee Brewers, and Los Angeles Dodgers from 1961 through 1977. Downing was an All Star in 1967 and the National League's Comeback Player of the Year in 1971. Downing allowed Hank Aaron's record breaking 715th home run on April 8, 1974.

Bill Skowron

William Joseph Skowron (December 18, 1930 – April 27, 2012), nicknamed "Moose", was an American professional baseball first baseman. He played thirteen seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1954 to 1967 for the New York Yankees, Los Angeles Dodgers, Washington Senators, Chicago White Sox, and California Angels. He had been a community relations representative for the Chicago White Sox for several years when he died in 2012. He is one of six players in MLB history to have won back-to back World Series championships on different teams.

Carl Erskine

Carl Daniel Erskine (born December 13, 1926) is a former right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played his entire career for the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers from 1948 through 1959. He was a pitching mainstay on Dodger teams which won five National League pennants, peaking with a 1953 season in which he won 20 games and set a World Series record with 14 strikeouts in a single game. Erskine pitched two of the NL's seven no-hitters during the 1950s. Following his baseball career, he was active as a business executive and an author.

Dick Nen

Richard Leroy Nen (born September 24, 1939) is a retired American professional baseball player. A former Major League Baseball first baseman, Nen appeared in 367 games for the Los Angeles Dodgers (1963), Washington Senators (1965–1967, 1970) and Chicago Cubs (1968). He threw and batted left-handed, stood 6 feet 2 inches (1.88 m) tall and weighed 200 pounds (91 kg). He is the father of former major league relief pitcher Robb Nen.

Dodger Stadium

Dodger Stadium, occasionally called by the metonym Chavez Ravine, is a baseball park located in the Elysian Park neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, the home field to the Los Angeles Dodgers, the city's National League franchise of Major League Baseball (MLB). Opened 57 years ago on April 10, 1962, it was constructed in less than three years at a cost of US$23 million, financed by private sources.

Dodger Stadium is currently the oldest ballpark in MLB west of the Mississippi River, and third-oldest overall, after Fenway Park in Boston (1912) and Wrigley Field in Chicago (1914) and is the world's largest baseball stadium by seat capacity. Often referred to as a "pitcher's ballpark", the stadium has seen twelve no-hitters, two of which were perfect games.

The stadium hosted the Major League Baseball All-Star Game in 1980—and will host in 2020—as well as games of 10 World Series (1963, 1965, 1966, 1974, 1977, 1978, 1981, 1988, 2017, and 2018). It also hosted the semifinals and finals of the 2009 and 2017 World Baseball Classics. It also hosted exhibition baseball during the 1984 Summer Olympics. It will also host baseball and softball during the 2028 Summer Olympics.

The stadium hosted a soccer tournament on August 3, 2013 featuring four clubs, the hometown team Los Angeles Galaxy, and Europe's Real Madrid, Everton, and Juventus.

For the first time at Dodger Stadium, the Los Angeles Kings and Anaheim Ducks played a regular season game on January 25, 2014 as part of the NHL Stadium Series.

Don Drysdale

Donald Scott Drysdale (July 23, 1936 – July 3, 1993) was an American professional baseball player and television sports commentator. A right-handed pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers for his entire career in Major League Baseball, Drysdale was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Drysdale won the 1962 Cy Young Award and in 1968 pitched a record six consecutive shutouts and ​58 2⁄3 consecutive scoreless innings.One of the most dominant pitchers of the late 1950s and early to mid 1960s, Drysdale stood 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m) tall and was not afraid to throw pitches near batters to keep them off balance. After his playing career, he became a radio and television broadcaster.

Harry Bright

Harry James Bright (September 22, 1929 – March 13, 2000) was an American professional baseball first baseman, third baseman and utility player in Major League Baseball from 1958 to 1965. He played for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Washington Senators, Cincinnati Reds, New York Yankees and Chicago Cubs. Born in Kansas City, Missouri, Bright stood 6 feet (1.8 m) tall, weighed 190 pounds (86 kg), and threw and batted right-handed.

Jim Bouton

James Alan Bouton (; March 8, 1939 – July 10, 2019) was an American professional baseball player. Bouton played in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a pitcher for the New York Yankees, Seattle Pilots, Houston Astros, and Atlanta Braves between 1962 and 1978. He was also a best-selling author, actor, activist, sportscaster and one of the creators of Big League Chew.

Bouton played college baseball at Western Michigan University, before signing his first professional contract with the Yankees. He was a member of the 1962 World Series champions, appeared in the 1963 MLB All-Star Game, and won both of his starts in the 1964 World Series. Later in his career, he developed and threw a knuckleball.

Bouton authored the baseball book Ball Four, which was a combination diary of his 1969 season and memoir of his years with the Yankees, Pilots, and Astros.

John Roseboro

John Junior Roseboro (May 13, 1933 – August 16, 2002) was an American professional baseball player and coach. He played as a catcher in Major League Baseball from 1957 until 1970, most notably for the Los Angeles Dodgers. Roseboro was a four-time All-Star player and won two Gold Glove Awards for his defensive skills. He was the Dodgers' starting catcher in four World Series with the Dodgers winning three of those. He is considered one of the best defensive catchers of the 1960s. Roseboro was known for his role in one of the most violent incidents in baseball history when Juan Marichal struck him in the head with a bat during a game in 1965.

Ken Rowe (baseball)

Kenneth Darrell Rowe (December 31, 1933 – November 22, 2012) was an American professional baseball player and coach whose career spanned 60 seasons. The native of Ferndale, Michigan, was a veteran of minor league baseball who appeared in 26 games over parts of three Major League seasons as a middle-relief pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers (1963) and Baltimore Orioles (1964–1965). He also spent all but two seasons of his coaching career in the minors; the exceptions came in 1985 and 1986 when he was the big-league pitching coach of the Orioles under managers Joe Altobelli and Earl Weaver.

Rowe batted and threw right-handed and was listed as 6 feet 2 inches (1.88 m) tall and 185 pounds (84 kg). He signed with his hometown Detroit Tigers in 1953 and bounced among five Detroit farm teams in the lower minors until November 1955, when he was drafted by the Dodgers, still in Brooklyn. He became a relief pitcher in 1962 with the Spokane Indians, appearing in 70 games, and then received his first MLB trial with the 1963 Dodgers. After a six-game, early season stint in Los Angeles, which netted Rowe his only MLB save (May 7 against the St. Louis Cardinals), he returned to Spokane until late July when the Dodgers recalled him. He then appeared in eight more games during the year's final three months, as the Dodgers successfully fended off the Cardinals to win the National League championship. He won his first MLB game September 26 with three innings of shutout relief against the New York Mets, but did not appear in the 1963 World Series, won by the Dodgers in a four-game sweep over the New York Yankees.

In 1964, Rowe found himself back in Spokane, where he worked in 88 games, all in relief, and posted a 16–11 record and sparkling 1.77 earned run average in 137 innings pitched. The performance impressed the Orioles, who were locked in a three-way struggle with the Yankees and Chicago White Sox for the American League pennant. They purchased Rowe's contract from Spokane September 10 and, four days later, called upon Rowe to take over for starting pitcher Milt Pappas in the ninth inning of a 3–3 tie at Memorial Stadium against the Minnesota Twins. Rowe retired the Twins in order and then was credited with the victory when the Orioles pushed across the winning run in the home half of the ninth. Rowe worked in five more games for Baltimore and was effective until his final two outings, as the Orioles finished third, only two games behind the Yankees.

He then made six early-season appearances for the 1965 Orioles before returning to the minors for the rest of his active career. In his brief MLB career, Rowe posted a 2–1 record with a 3.21 ERA and one save in 26 games pitched, including nine games finished, 19 strikeouts, 14 walks, and 45⅓ innings. He allowed 55 hits.

His acquisition by Baltimore in late 1964 marked a long association with the Orioles, whom he served as a minor league manager, pitching coach and pitching coordinator, and MLB pitching coach through 1986. After working in the Yankees' and Philadelphia Phillies' systems, he joined the Cleveland Indians in 1991 as a minor league pitching coach, working with the Triple-A Buffalo Bisons and the Short-season Mahoning Valley Scrappers, among other assignments, for 22 seasons until his death in 2012.

List of World Series champions

The World Series is the annual championship series of Major League Baseball (MLB) and concludes the MLB postseason. First played in 1903, the World Series championship is determined through a best-of-seven playoff and is a contest between the champions of baseball's National League (NL) and American League (AL). Often referred to as the "Fall Classic", the modern World Series has been played every year since 1903 with two exceptions: in 1904, when the NL champion New York Giants declined to play the AL champion Boston Americans; and in 1994, when the series was canceled due to the players' strike.The best-of-seven style has been the format of all World Series except in 1903, 1919, 1920, and 1921, when the winner was determined through a best-of-nine playoff. Although the large majority of contests have been played entirely during the month of October, a small number of Series have also had games played during September and November. The Series-winning team is awarded the Commissioner's Trophy. Players, coaches and others associated with the team are generally given World Series rings to commemorate their victory; however, they have received other items such as pocket watches and medallions in the past. The winning team is traditionally invited to the White House to meet the President of the United States.

A total of 114 Series have been contested, with the NL champion winning 48 and the AL champion winning 66. The New York Yankees of the AL have played in 40 World Series through 2018—winning 27—the most Series appearances and most victories of any Major League Baseball franchise. The Los Angeles Dodgers of the NL have the most losses with 14. The St. Louis Cardinals have represented the NL 19 times, and won 11 championships, second-most among all teams and most among NL clubs. Both the Giants and the Los Angeles Dodgers have appeared in more World Series, with 20 each.

The Seattle Mariners and the Washington Nationals (formerly Montreal Expos) are the only current Major League Baseball franchises to have never appeared in a World Series; the San Diego Padres, Colorado Rockies, Texas Rangers (formerly the 1961–1971 version of the Washington Senators), Tampa Bay Rays, and Milwaukee Brewers (formerly Seattle Pilots) have all played in the Series but have never won. The Toronto Blue Jays are the only franchise from outside the United States to appear in a World Series, winning in 1992 and 1993. The Houston Astros have represented both the NL (2005) and the AL (2017), winning the Series in 2017. The current World Series champions are the Boston Red Sox.

Marv Breeding

Marv Eugene Breeding (May 8, 1934 – December 31, 2006) was an American professional baseball second baseman. He played four seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Baltimore Orioles, Washington Senators, and Los Angeles Dodgers between 1960 and 1963.Breeding graduated from Jesuit High School in New Orleans, and then played shortstop for the baseball team at Samford University (then called Howard College). He also was a guard for the basketball squad and place-kicker for the football team whose quarterback then was Bobby Bowden. His slick fielding abilities and a quick bat prompted him to sign with the Baltimore Orioles in 1955.

Breeding reached the major leagues in 1960 with the Orioles, spending three years with them before moving to the Washington Senators and Los Angeles Dodgers. His most productive season came in 1960 as the regular second baseman for Baltimore, when he posted career-highs in batting average (.267), home runs (3), runs (69), RBI (43), hits (147), doubles (25), stolen bases (10) and games played (152), including seven three-hits games. His 117 singles ranked him ninth in the American League.

Before the 1963 season Breeding was sent to the new Washington Senators in a five-players deal, playing at third and second bases. Then, in the midseason he was traded to the Dodgers. While in Los Angeles, Breeding served as a backup for injured Jim Gilliam (2B) and Maury Wills (SS). He sat the bench as a member of the Dodgers in their four-game sweep over the New York Yankees during the 1963 World Series.

In a four-season majors career, Breeding was a .250 hitter with seven home runs and 92 RBI in 415 games. After that, he played in the minor leagues for the Dodgers, Orioles, Giants, Astros, White Sox, and Twins organizations.

Following his baseball retirement in 1968, Breeding worked as a manufacturer's representative and eventually started Marve Breeding Enterprises, which included M&B Industries machine shop in Decatur. In February 2006, he was selected to the Samford Baseball Hall of Fame.

Breeding died in his home at the age of 72.

Ralph Terry

Ralph Willard Terry (born January 9, 1936) is an American former right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. Terry is perhaps best known as the MVP of the 1962 World Series, and for giving up the walk-off home run to Bill Mazeroski that enabled the Pittsburgh Pirates to win the 1960 World Series.

Tom Tresh

Thomas Michael Tresh (September 20, 1938 – October 15, 2008), was a professional baseball infielder and outfielder who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees (1961–1969) and Detroit Tigers (1969). Tresh was a switch-hitter and threw right-handed. He was the son of the late MLB catcher Mike Tresh.

Tommy Davis

Herman Thomas "Tommy" Davis, Jr. (born March 21, 1939) is an American former Major League Baseball left fielder and third baseman. He played from 1959–76 for ten different teams, but he is best known for his years with the Los Angeles Dodgers when he was a two-time National League batting champion.

During an 18-year baseball career, Davis batted .294 with 153 home runs, 2,121 hits and 1,052 runs batted in. He was also one of the most proficient pinch-hitters in baseball history with a .320 batting average (63-for-197) – the highest in major league history upon his retirement, breaking the .312 mark of Frenchy Bordagaray. In 1962, he finished third in the MVP voting after leading the major leagues in batting average, hits and runs batted in. Davis' 153 RBIs in that season broke Roy Campanella's team record of 142 in 1953 and remain the franchise record; his 230 hits are the team record for a right-handed batter (second most in franchise history behind only Babe Herman's 241 in 1930), and his .346 average was the highest by a Dodger right-handed hitter in the 20th century until it was broken by Mike Piazza in 1997.

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