1963 Pro Bowl

The 1963 Pro Bowl was the NFL's thirteenth annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1962 season. The game was played on January 13, 1963, at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California in front of 61,374 fans. The Eastern Conference was coached by Allie Sherman of the New York Giants and the West by Vince Lombardi of the Green Bay Packers.[1]

Cleveland Browns fullback Jim Brown set a Pro Bowl record, carrying for 141 yards, breaking his own record of 120 set the previous year; he was named the "Back of the Game." "Big Daddy" Gene Lipscomb of the Pittsburgh Steelers was awarded "Lineman of the Game" honors; he had perhaps the finest day of any defender in the history of the Pro Bowl, blocking two field goals and being responsible for hits that led to six West fumbles.[2]

1963 East–West Pro Bowl
Eastern Conference Western Conference
30 20
Head coach:
Allie Sherman
(New York Giants)
Head coach:
Vince Lombardi
(Green Bay Packers)
1234 Total
Eastern Conference 130017 30
Western Conference 03170 20
DateJanuary 13, 1963
StadiumMemorial Coliseum, Los Angeles, California
Co-MVPsJim Brown (Cleveland Browns), Eugene Lipscomb (Pittsburgh Steelers)
Attendance61,374
TV in the United States
NetworkNBC
AnnouncersChuck Thompson, Ken Coleman

References

  1. ^ "East stars score 30–20 upset in Pro Bowl". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. AP. January 14, 1963. pp. 22–23. Retrieved January 20, 2012.
  2. ^ "The 1963 Pro Bowl". Bolding Sports Research. Archived from the original on 2012-01-20. Retrieved January 20, 2012.

External links

1964 Pro Bowl

The 1964 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 14th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1963 season. The game was played on January 12, 1964, at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California in front of a crowd of 67,242. The final score was West 31, East 17.The game featured Chicago Bears coach George Halas' first appearance as an all-star coach since the 1942 All-Star game which featured Halas' Bears against an all-league squad; it was also to be his final Pro Bowl appearance. Allie Sherman of the New York Giants was the coach of the East. Two Baltimore Colts swept the player of the game awards: Johnny Unitas was named "back of the game" (his third Pro Bowl MVP) and Gino Marchetti won "lineman of the game" honors. Marchetti presented the game ball to Halas.

Bobby Joe Conrad

Robert Joseph Conrad (born November 17, 1935 in Clifton, Texas) is a former professional American football wide receiver in the National Football League for the Chicago Cardinals, St. Louis Cardinals and Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at Texas A&M University.

Boxford, Massachusetts

Boxford is a town in Essex County, Massachusetts, United States. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the town's population in 2016 was 8,277.The original town center of Boxford, was East Boxford and other areas in the eastern part of the town, comprise the census-designated place of Boxford.

Gail Cogdill

Gail Ross Cogdill (April 7, 1937 – October 20, 2016) was an American football player. He played college football at the end position for the Washington State Cougars football team from 1957 to 1959. He was selected by the Detroit Lions in the 1960 NFL Draft and played professional football as a split end and wide receiver in the National Football League (NFL) for the Detroit Lions (1960–1968), the Baltimore Colts (1968), and the Atlanta Falcons (1969–1970). He won the NFL Rookie of the Year Award in 1960 and played in three Pro Bowls, after the 1960, 1962, and 1963 seasons. During an 11-year NFL career, he caught 356 passes for 5,696 yards and scored a total of 36 touchdowns.

Johnny Morris (American football)

Johnny Edward Morris (born September 26, 1935) is a former American football running back/wide receiver in the National Football League. He spent his entire ten-year career with the Chicago Bears, and is the franchise's all-time leader in receiving yards with 5,059. He attended the University of California, Santa Barbara. Morris won an NFL championship in 1963. In 1964, he had his best season with 93 receptions for 1,200 yards and 10 touchdowns.

In 1964, while still playing for the Bears, Morris joined WBBM-TV in Chicago as a sportscaster. Except for a six-year stint at rival WMAQ-TV, Morris remained at WBBM until 1992, serving for most of that time as sports director. During his time at WBBM-TV, he popularised the use of the telestrator (a device for drawing over still or moving video images) in sports television, which was invented by fellow WBBM-TV employee Leonard Reiffel for his science-related TV series Dimensions on Tomorrow's Living and The World Tomorrow. He also served as a football color commentator for CBS' NFL coverage from 1975 to 1986. He retired in 1996.

List of Arkansas Razorbacks in the NFL draft

The National Football League (NFL) have drafted 269 players who had played for the University of Arkansas Razorbacks since the league began holding drafts in 1936. The Razorbacks' highest draft position was second overall in 1954, when Lamar McHan was selected by the Chicago Cardinals. Arkansas' first drafted player in the NFL was Jack Robbins, who was the fifth overall pick by the Chicago Cardinals in 1938. Five former players were selected from the latest NFL draft: Trey Flowers, Martrell Spaight, Tevin Mitchel, Darius Philon, and A.J. Derby.

Each NFL franchise seeks to add new players through the annual NFL draft. The team with the worst record the previous year picks first, the next-worst team second, and so on. Teams that did not make the playoffs are ordered by their regular-season record, with any remaining ties broken by strength of schedule. Playoff participants are sequenced after non-playoff teams, based on their round of elimination (wild card, division, conference, and Super Bowl).Before the AFL–NFL merger agreements in 1966, the American Football League (AFL) operated in direct competition with the NFL and held a separate draft. This led to a massive bidding war over top prospects between the two leagues. As part of the merger agreement on June 8, 1966, the two leagues would hold a multiple round "Common Draft". Once the AFL officially merged with the NFL in 1970, the "common draft" simply became the NFL draft.

Willie Galimore

Willie "The Wisp" Galimore (March 30, 1935 – July 27, 1964) was an American football running back for the Chicago Bears from 1957–1963. He attended Florida A&M University, working with the legendary coach Jake Gaither. Galimore is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame.

Galimore possessed incredible speed and lateral movement; many of the opposing players of the time stated that they believed Galimore could run side-to-side down the field just as fast as most men could in a straight line. His running style could be said to most resemble the style of Billy Sims or perhaps Terrell Davis, but faster.

In a documentary short by NFL Films on Galimore, it was said that he was probably the last great find before NFL scouting became sophisticated. Bears assistant coach Phil Handler, while scouting for talent in Florida, received a tip about Galimore's prowess as a halfback, and the Bears subsequently drafted him in the 5th round of the 1956 NFL draft. Galimore's peers (including Chuck Bednarik and Doug Atkins) referred to Galimore as one of the best runners they ever faced.

Galimore was killed in an automobile accident on July 27, 1964 in Rensselaer, Indiana at the age of 29 with teammate Bo Farrington. His number 28 has been retired by the Bears.His son, Ron Galimore, was the first Black U.S. Olympic gymnast.

Willie Galimore's last visit to his hometown of St. Augustine, Florida came just weeks before his death, and he participated in the St. Augustine movement during the Civil Rights Movement, becoming the first Black person who was able to register as a guest at the previously all-white Ponce de Leon Motor Lodge (where the arrest of the 72-year-old mother of the governor of Massachusetts for trying to be served in a racially integrated group had made national headlines a few months before). Galimore's civil rights activism is honored with a Freedom Trail marker at his home at 57 Chapin Street in St. Augustine. His widow, Mrs. Audrey Galimore, took part in the dedication of the marker on July 2, 2007. A community center in the historic Lincolnville neighborhood of the city also bears Galimore's name, and he is depicted on a historical mural painted by schoolchildren on Washington Street.

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