1963 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1963 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 34th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 9, 1963 in Cleveland, Ohio, at Cleveland Municipal Stadium, home of the American League's Cleveland Indians. The game was won by the National League 5–3.

From 1959 to 1962, baseball experimented with a pair of All-Star Games per year. That ended with this 1963 game, which also marked the 30th anniversary of the inaugural All-Star Game played in Chicago in 1933.

1963 Major League Baseball All-Star Game
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
National League 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 5 6 0
American League 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 11 1
DateJuly 9, 1963
VenueCleveland Municipal Stadium
CityCleveland, Ohio
Managers
TelevisionNBC
TV announcersVin Scully and Joe Garagiola
RadioNBC
Radio announcersBob Neal and George Bryson

Scoring summary

The teams traded runs in the second inning. Willie Mays drew a walk off Ken McBride, stole second and scored on a Dick Groat single. The AL tied the score when Jim O'Toole gave up a Leon Wagner single, hit Zoilo Versalles with a pitch and surrendered an RBI hit to his pitching counterpart, McBride.

In the third, both sides scored twice. Behind 3-1, the AL struck back on a double by Albie Pearson and singles by Frank Malzone and Earl Battey to tie it at 3-all.

The NL scratched out a run off Jim Bunning in the fifth to regain the lead, then made it 5-3 in the eighth when Bill White singled off Dick Radatz, stole second and scored on a Ron Santo single. Don Drysdale closed it out in the eighth and ninth, retiring Bobby Richardson on a game-ending double play.

Rosters

Players in italics have since been inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

National League

Starters
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Jim O'Toole Reds 1
C Ed Bailey Giants 6
1B Bill White Cardinals 7
2B Bill Mazeroski-x Pirates 7
3B Ken Boyer Cardinals 10
SS Dick Groat Cardinals 7
OF Hank Aaron Braves 13
OF Tommy Davis Dodgers 3
OF Willie Mays Giants 14
Pitchers
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Ray Culp Phillies 1
P Don Drysdale Dodgers 5
P Larry Jackson Cubs 5
P Sandy Koufax Dodgers 5
P Juan Marichal Giants 3
P Warren Spahn Braves 17
P Hal Woodeshick Colt .45s 1
Reserves
Position Player Team All-Star Games
C Joe Torre Braves 1
1B Orlando Cepeda Giants 9
2B Julián Javier-y Cardinals 1
3B Ron Santo Cubs 1
SS Maury Wills Dodgers 5
OF Roberto Clemente Pirates 7
OF Willie McCovey Giants 1
OF Stan Musial Cardinals 24
OF Duke Snider Mets 8

American League

Starters
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Ken McBride Angels 3
C Earl Battey Twins 3
1B Joe Pepitone Yankees 5
2B Nellie Fox White Sox 15
3B Frank Malzone Red Sox 7
SS Zoilo Versalles Twins 1
OF Al Kaline Tigers 12
OF Albie Pearson Angels 1
OF Leon Wagner Angels 3
Pitchers
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Steve Barber-x Orioles 1
P Jim Bouton Yankees 1
P Jim Bunning Tigers 7
P Mudcat Grant Indians 1
P Bill Monbouquette-y Red Sox 4
P Juan Pizarro White Sox 1
P Dick Radatz Red Sox 1
Reserves
Position Player Team All-Star Games
C Elston Howard Yankees 10
C Don Leppert Senators 1
1B-OF Norm Siebern Athletics 3
2B Bobby Richardson Yankees 5
3B Brooks Robinson Orioles 7
SS Luis Aparicio Orioles 9
OF Bob Allison Twins 2
OF Harmon Killebrew Twins 5
OF Mickey Mantle-x Yankees 16
OF Tom Tresh Yankees 3
OF Carl Yastrzemski Red Sox 1

x - injured

y - replacement for injured player

Note: Bill Mazeroski was selected for the starting lineup, but did not play due to injury. Julián Javier took his spot in the starting batting order.

Game

Starting lineups

National League American League
Order Player Team Position Order Player Team Position
1 Tommy Davis Dodgers LF 1 Nellie Fox White Sox 2B
2 Hank Aaron Braves RF 2 Albie Pearson Angels CF
3 Bill White Cardinals 1B 3 Al Kaline Tigers RF
4 Willie Mays Giants CF 4 Frank Malzone Red Sox 3B
5 Ed Bailey Giants C 5 Leon Wagner Angels LF
6 Ken Boyer Cardinals 3B 6 Earl Battey Twins C
7 Dick Groat Cardinals SS 7 Joe Pepitone Yankees 1B
8 Julián Javier Cardinals 2B 8 Zoilo Versalles Twins SS
9 Jim O'Toole Reds P 9 Ken McBride Angels P

Umpires

Position Umpire
Home Plate Hank Soar (AL)
First Base Bill Jackowski (NL)
Second Base Al Smith (AL)[1]
Third Base Paul Pryor (NL)
Left Field Bill Haller (AL)
Right Field Doug Harvey (NL)

Game summary

Tuesday, July 9, 1963 1:00 pm (ET) at Municipal Stadium in Cleveland, Ohio
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
National League 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 5 6 0
American League 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 11 1
WP: Larry Jackson (1-0)   LP: Jim Bunning (0-1)

References

  1. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/ALS/ALS196307090.shtml

External links

1963 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1963 Los Angeles Dodgers were led by pitcher Sandy Koufax, who won both the Cy Young Award and the Most Valuable Player Award. The team went 99–63 to win the National League title by six games over the runner-up St. Louis Cardinals and beat the New York Yankees in four games to win the 1963 World Series, marking the first time that the Yankees were ever swept in the postseason.

1963 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1963 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 81st in franchise history. The 87–75 Phillies finished the season in fourth place in the National League, 12 games behind the NL and World Champion Los Angeles Dodgers.

1964 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1964 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 35th midseason exhibition between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was played on July 7, 1964, at Shea Stadium in New York City, New York, home of the New York Mets of the National League. The game was a 7–4 victory for the NL. Johnny Callison hit a walk-off home run, the most recent MLB All-Star game to end in such a fashion.

Dick Radatz

Richard Raymond Radatz (April 2, 1937 – March 16, 2005) was an American relief pitcher in Major League Baseball. Nicknamed "The Monster", the 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m), 230 lb (100 kg) right-hander had a scorching but short-lived period of dominance for the Boston Red Sox in the early sixties. He got his nickname by striking out several New York Yankees in a row at a game in Fenway Park in 1963. Mickey Mantle, who was struck out by Radatz 12 times in his 16 career at bats against the pitcher, was heard calling him "that monster", and the name stuck.

Hal Woodeshick

Harold Joseph Woodeshick (August 24, 1932 – June 14, 2009) was an American left-handed pitcher who spent eleven seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) with the Detroit Tigers (1956 and 1961), Cleveland Indians (1958), the original modern Washington Senators franchise (1959–60), the expansion Washington Senators club (1961), Houston Colt .45s and Astros (1962–65), and St. Louis Cardinals (1965–67). He was the first-ever closer in the history of the Astros' franchise. He was also a member of the Cardinals' 1967 World Series Championship team. He was nicknamed The Switchman for his ability to "turn out the lights" on opposing batters.

Juan Pizarro (baseball)

Juan Pizarro a.k.a. "Terín" (born February 7, 1937) is a former Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher. He played for 18 seasons on 9 teams, from 1957 through 1974. In 1964, he won 19 games (19–9) and pitched 4 shutouts for the Chicago White Sox. He also was an All-Star player in 1963 and 1964.

Games
Players
Events
Results and Awards
See also
American League
National League
Related
programs
Related
articles
Commentators
Key figures
Lore
World Series
AL Championship
NL Championship
AL Division Series
NL Division Series
All-Star Game
Seasons
Related programs
Related articles
Commentators
Key figures
Lore
All-Star Game
World Series

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.