1963–64 FA Cup

The 1963–64 FA Cup was the 83rd staging of the world's oldest football cup competition, the Football Association Challenge Cup, commonly known as the FA Cup. West Ham United won the competition for the first time (despite having reached the 1923 final), beating Preston North End 3–2 in the final at Wembley.

Matches were scheduled to be played at the stadium of the team named first on the date specified for each round, which was always a Saturday. Some matches, however, might be rescheduled for other days if there were clashes with games for other competitions or the weather was inclement. If scores were level after 90 minutes had been played, a replay would take place at the stadium of the second-named team later the same week. If scores were level after 90 minutes had been played in a replay, a 30-minute period of extra time would be played.

1963–64 FA Cup
Country England
 Wales
Teams375
Defending championsManchester United
ChampionsWest Ham United
(1st title)
Runners-upPreston North End
Matches played459
Goals scored1631 (3.55 per match)

Calendar

Round Date
First Qualifying Round Saturday 7 September 1963
Second Qualifying Round Saturday 21 September 1963
Third Qualifying Round Saturday 5 October 1963
Fourth Qualifying Round Saturday 19 October 1963
First Round Proper Saturday 16 November 1963
Second Round Saturday 7 December 1963
Third Round Saturday 4 January 1964
Fourth Round Saturday 25 January 1964
Fifth Round Saturday 15 February 1964
Sixth Round Saturday 29 February 1964
Semi Finals Saturday 14 March 1964
Final Saturday 2 May 1964

Results

First Round Proper

At this stage clubs from the Football League Third and Fourth Divisions joined those non-league clubs having come through the qualifying rounds. Matches were scheduled to be played on Saturday, 16 November 1963, although three games were not played until the midweek fixture. Eight were drawn and went to replays.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Chester 3–2 Blyth Spartans 16 November 1963
2 Darlington 1–4 Gateshead 16 November 1963
3 Bournemouth 1–3 Bristol Rovers 16 November 1963
4 Barrow 3–2 Bangor City 16 November 1963
5 Rochdale 2–1 Chorley 18 November 1963
6 Sutton United 0–4 Aldershot 16 November 1963
7 Weymouth 1–1 Bedford Town 16 November 1963
Replay Bedford Town 1–0 Weymouth 21 November 1963
8 Yeovil Town 1–0 Southend United 16 November 1963
9 Reading 2–2 Enfield 16 November 1963
Replay Enfield 2–4 Reading 19 November 1963
10 Notts County 2–1 Frickley Colliery 16 November 1963
11 Doncaster Rovers 3–0 Tranmere Rovers 16 November 1963
12 Trowbridge Town 1–6 Coventry City 16 November 1963
13 Queens Park Rangers 4–1 Gillingham 16 November 1963
14 Barnsley 1–0 Stockport County 16 November 1963
15 Brentford 2–2 Margate 16 November 1963
Replay Margate 0–2 Brentford 20 November 1963
16 Crook Town 1–2 Chesterfield 16 November 1963
17 Brighton & Hove Albion 0–1 Colchester United 16 November 1963
18 Bradford City 1–2 Port Vale 16 November 1963
19 Hull City 2–2 Crewe Alexandra 16 November 1963
Replay Crewe Alexandra 0–3 Hull City 20 November 1963
20 Oldham Athletic 3–2 Mansfield Town 20 November 1963
21 Crystal Palace 8–2 Harwich & Parkeston 16 November 1963
22 Altrincham 0–0 Wrexham 20 November 1963
Replay Wrexham 3–0 Altrincham 27 November 1963
23 Bradford Park Avenue 3–1 Heanor Town 16 November 1963
24 Exeter City 2–1 Shrewsbury Town 16 November 1963
25 Hartlepools United 0–1 Lincoln City 16 November 1963
26 Southport 2–1 Walsall 16 November 1963
27 Maidenhead United 0–2 Bath City 16 November 1963
28 Torquay United 6–2 Barnet 16 November 1963
29 Workington 4–1 Halifax Town 16 November 1963
30 York City 2–5 Carlisle United 16 November 1963
31 Hereford United 1–1 Newport County 16 November 1963
Replay Newport County 4–0 Hereford United 18 November 1963
32 Kettering Town 1–1 Millwall 16 November 1963
Replay Millwall 2–3 Kettering Town 25 November 1963
33 Netherfield (Kendal) 6–1 Loughborough United 16 November 1963
34 Tooting & Mitcham United 1–2 Gravesend & Northfleet 16 November 1963
35 Peterborough United 1–1 Watford 16 November 1963
Replay Watford 2–1 Peterborough United 19 November 1963
36 Bridgwater Town 0–3 Luton Town 16 November 1963
37 Corby Town 1–3 Bristol City 16 November 1963
38 Cambridge United 0–1 Chelmsford City 16 November 1963
39 Oxford United 2–0 Folkestone 16 November 1963
40 Bexley United 1–5 Wimbledon 16 November 1963

Second Round

The matches were scheduled for Saturday, 7 December 1963. Three matches were drawn, with replays taking place later the same week.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Chester 0–2 Barrow 7 December 1963
2 Yeovil Town 3–1 Crystal Palace 7 December 1963
3 Lincoln City 2–0 Southport 7 December 1963
4 Luton Town 2–1 Reading 7 December 1963
5 Doncaster Rovers 1–1 Notts County 7 December 1963
Replay Notts County 1–2 Doncaster Rovers 10 December 1963
6 Wrexham 0–2 Hull City 7 December 1963
7 Barnsley 3–1 Rochdale 7 December 1963
8 Brentford 1–0 Gravesend & Northfleet 7 December 1963
9 Coventry City 1–2 Bristol Rovers 7 December 1963
10 Carlisle United 4–3 Gateshead 7 December 1963
11 Oldham Athletic 2–0 Bradford Park Avenue 7 December 1963
12 Wimbledon 2–2 Bath City 7 December 1963
Replay Bath City 4–0 Wimbledon 12 December 1963
13 Exeter City 0–2 Bristol City 7 December 1963
14 Port Vale 2–1 Workington 7 December 1963
15 Newport County 2–0 Watford 7 December 1963
16 Torquay United 2–3 Aldershot 7 December 1963
17 Netherfield (Kendal) 1–1 Chesterfield 7 December 1963
Replay Chesterfield 4–1 Netherfield (Kendal) 11 December 1963
18 Colchester United 0–1 Queens Park Rangers 7 December 1963
19 Chelmsford City 0–1 Bedford Town 7 December 1963
20 Oxford United 2–1 Kettering Town 7 December 1963

Third Round

The 44 First and Second Division clubs entered the competition at this stage. The matches were scheduled for Saturday, 4 January 1964. Nine matches were drawn and went to replays, though none of these then resulted in a second replay.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Bath City 1–1 Bolton Wanderers 4 January 1964
Replay Bolton Wanderers 3–0 Bath City 8 January 1964
2 Burnley 1–1 Rotherham United 4 January 1964
Replay Rotherham United 2–3 Burnley 7 January 1964
3 Liverpool 5–0 Derby County 4 January 1964
4 Southampton 2–3 Manchester United 4 January 1964
5 Yeovil Town 0–2 Bury 4 January 1964
6 Leicester City 2–3 Leyton Orient 4 January 1964
7 Nottingham Forest 0–0 Preston North End 4 January 1964
Replay Preston North End 1–0 Nottingham Forest 13 January 1964
8 Blackburn Rovers 4–0 Grimsby Town 4 January 1964
9 Aston Villa 0–0 Aldershot 4 January 1964
Replay Aldershot 2–1 Aston Villa 8 January 1964
10 West Bromwich Albion 2–2 Blackpool 4 January 1964
Replay Blackpool 0–1 West Bromwich Albion 8 January 1964
11 Sunderland 2–0 Northampton Town 4 January 1964
12 Lincoln City 0–4 Sheffield United 4 January 1964
13 Swindon Town 2–1 Manchester City 4 January 1964
14 Doncaster Rovers 2–2 Bristol City 4 January 1964
Replay Bristol City 2–0 Doncaster Rovers 7 January 1964
15 Ipswich Town 6–3 Oldham Athletic 4 January 1964
16 Newcastle United 1–2 Bedford Town 4 January 1964
17 Tottenham Hotspur 1–1 Chelsea 4 January 1964
Replay Chelsea 2–0 Tottenham Hotspur 8 January 1964
18 Fulham 4–1 Luton Town 4 January 1964
19 Brentford 2–1 Middlesbrough 4 January 1964
20 Bristol Rovers 2–1 Norwich City 4 January 1964
21 West Ham United 3–0 Charlton Athletic 4 January 1964
22 Plymouth Argyle 0–1 Huddersfield Town 4 January 1964
23 Hull City 1–1 Everton 4 January 1964
Replay Everton 2–1 Hull City 7 January 1964
24 Carlisle United 2–0 Queens Park Rangers 4 January 1964
25 Scunthorpe United 2–2 Barnsley 4 January 1964
Replay Barnsley 3–2 Scunthorpe United 7 January 1964
26 Cardiff City 0–1 Leeds United 4 January 1964
27 Newport County 3–2 Sheffield Wednesday 4 January 1964
28 Swansea Town 4–1 Barrow 4 January 1964
29 Arsenal 2–1 Wolverhampton Wanderers 4 January 1964
30 Stoke City 4–1 Portsmouth 4 January 1964
31 Birmingham City 1–2 Port Vale 4 January 1964
32 Oxford United 1–0 Chesterfield 4 January 1964

Fourth Round

The matches were scheduled for Saturday, 25 January 1964. Eight matches were drawn and went to replays. The replays were all played two, three or four days later.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Burnley 2–1 Newport County 25 January 1964
2 Liverpool 0–0 Port Vale 25 January 1964
Replay Port Vale 1–2 Liverpool 27 January 1964
3 Blackburn Rovers 2–0 Fulham 25 January 1964
4 Bolton Wanderers 2–2 Preston North End 25 January 1964
Replay Preston North End 2–1 Bolton Wanderers 27 January 1964
5 West Bromwich Albion 3–3 Arsenal 25 January 1964
Replay Arsenal 2–0 West Bromwich Albion 29 January 1964
6 Sunderland 6–1 Bristol City 25 January 1964
7 Sheffield United 1–1 Swansea Town 25 January 1964
Replay Swansea Town 4–0 Sheffield United 28 January 1964
8 Ipswich Town 1–1 Stoke City 25 January 1964
Replay Stoke City 1–0 Ipswich Town 29 January 1964
9 Barnsley 2–1 Bury 25 January 1964
10 Manchester United 4–1 Bristol Rovers 25 January 1964
11 Chelsea 1–2 Huddersfield Town 25 January 1964
12 Bedford Town 0–3 Carlisle United 25 January 1964
13 Leeds United 1–1 Everton 25 January 1964
Replay Everton 2–0 Leeds United 28 January 1964
14 Aldershot 1–2 Swindon Town 25 January 1964
15 Leyton Orient 1–1 West Ham United 25 January 1964
Replay West Ham United 3–0 Leyton Orient 29 January 1964
16 Oxford United 2–2 Brentford 25 January 1964
Replay Brentford 1–2 Oxford United 28 January 1964

Fifth Round

The matches were scheduled for Saturday, 15 February 1964. The Stoke City – Swansea Town match went to a replay in the midweek fixture, with Swansea winning the tie.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Burnley 3–0 Huddersfield Town 15 February 1964
2 Preston North End 1–0 Carlisle United 15 February 1964
3 Sunderland 3–1 Everton 15 February 1964
4 Swindon Town 1–3 West Ham United 15 February 1964
5 Barnsley 0–4 Manchester United 15 February 1964
6 Arsenal 0–1 Liverpool 15 February 1964
7 Stoke City 2–2 Swansea Town 15 February 1964
Replay Swansea Town 2–0 Stoke City 18 February 1964
8 Oxford United 3–1 Blackburn Rovers 15 February 1964

Sixth Round

The four quarter-final ties were scheduled to be played on Saturday, 29 February 1964. The Manchester United–Sunderland match went to two replays before the tie was settled, in United's favour.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Liverpool 1–2 Swansea Town 29 February 1964
2 West Ham United 3–2 Burnley 29 February 1964
3 Manchester United 3–3 Sunderland 29 February 1964
Replay Sunderland 2–2 Manchester United 4 March 1964
Replay Sunderland 1–5 Manchester United 9 March 1964
4 Oxford United 1–2 Preston North End 29 February 1964

Semi-finals

The semi-final matches were played on Saturday, 14 March 1964 with no replays required. Preston North End and West Ham United came through the semi final round to meet at Wembley.

Preston North End2–1Swansea Town
Dawson Goal 54' (pen)
Singleton Goal 75'
McLaughlin Goal 44'
West Ham United3–1Manchester United
Boyce Goal 56'62'
Hurst Goal 79'
Law Goal 77'

Final

The 1964 FA Cup Final was contested by Preston North End and West Ham United at Wembley on Saturday, 2 May 1964. The match finished 3–2 to West Ham, with the winning goal being scored in the 90th minute.

Preston North End2 – 3West Ham United
Holden Goal 10'
Dawson Goal 40'
Sissons Goal 11'
Hurst Goal 52'
Boyce Goal 90'
Preston North End
West Ham United

References

General
Specific
1963–64 Birmingham City F.C. season

The 1963–64 Football League season was Birmingham City Football Club's 61st in the Football League and their 37th in the First Division. They finished in 20th position in the 22-team division, only one point above the relegation places. They lost their opening match in each of the cup competitions, to Port Vale in the third round proper of the 1963–64 FA Cup and to Norwich City in the second round of the League Cup.

Although Birmingham maintained their First Division status, the board of directors asked Gil Merrick to resign as manager. He had been with the club for 25 years as player – he was first-choice goalkeeper for 14 years and, as of 2012, he held the club's appearance record – and manager, having led Birmingham to the 1961 Fairs Cup Final in his first season and to victory in the 1963 League Cup Final to win the club's first and, until 2011, only major trophy. In June, Nottingham Forest's trainer-coach Joe Mallett was brought in with responsibility for "team affairs, including team selection". He was formally appointed manager early in the 1964–65 season.Twenty-five players made at least one appearance in nationally organised first-team competition, and there were fifteen different goalscorers. Forward Mike Hellawell played in 42 of the 44 first-team matches over the season, and Bertie Auld finished as leading goalscorer with 10 goals, all scored in league competition.

1963–64 FA Cup qualifying rounds

The FA Cup 1963–64 is the 83rd season of the world's oldest football knockout competition; The Football Association Challenge Cup, or FA Cup for short. The large number of clubs entering the tournament from lower down the English football league system meant that the competition started with a number of preliminary and qualifying rounds. The 30 victorious teams from the Fourth Round Qualifying progressed to the First Round Proper.

1964 FA Charity Shield

The 1964 FA Charity Shield was the 42nd FA Charity Shield, an annual football match played between the winners of the previous season's First Division and FA Cup competitions. The match was played on 15 August 1964 at Anfield, Liverpool and contested by Liverpool, who had won the 1963–64 First Division, and West Ham United, who had won the 1964 FA Cup Final. The teams played out a 2–2 draw and shared the Charity Shield.

1964 FA Cup Final

The 1964 FA Cup Final was the 83rd final of the FA Cup. It took place on 2 May 1964 at Wembley Stadium and was contested between West Ham United and Preston North End.

West Ham, captained by Bobby Moore and managed by Ron Greenwood, won the match 3–2 to win the FA Cup for the first time. Second Division Preston led twice through Doug Holden and Alex Dawson respectively, with John Sissons and Geoff Hurst equalising for West Ham. Ronnie Boyce then scored the winner for the London club in the 90th minute.

Preston's Howard Kendall became the youngest player to play in a Wembley FA Cup Final, aged 17 years and 345 days. He retained this record until 1980, when Paul Allen played in that year's final for West Ham at the age of 17 years and 256 days.

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Arthur Holland (referee)

Arthur Holland (26 November 1916 – March 1987) was an English football referee.

Bobby Collins (footballer)

Robert Young "Bobby" Collins (16 February 1931 – 13 January 2014) was a Scotland international football player, best known for his successful spells at Celtic, Everton and Leeds United.

Derek Draper (footballer)

Derek Draper (born 11 May 1943, Swansea) is a Welsh former professional footballer. He made more than 450 Football League appearances for four clubs, with the majority of his career being spent with Chester.

Flixton F.C.

Flixton F.C. were an English football club based in Flixton, near Urmston in Greater Manchester. They played in the North West Counties Football League Premier Division until 2012 when they resigned from the league. They were members of the Manchester Football Association. They played their home games at Valley Road in Flixton.

Jack Charlton

John Charlton, (born 8 May 1935) is an English former footballer and manager who played as a defender. He was part of the England team that won the 1966 World Cup. He is the elder brother of former Manchester United forward Bobby Charlton, who was also a teammate in England's World Cup final victory. He spent his entire club career with Leeds United from 1950 to 1973, helping the club to the Second Division title (1963–64), First Division title (1968–69), FA Cup (1972), League Cup (1968), Charity Shield (1969), Inter-Cities Fairs Cup (1968 and 1971), as well as one other promotion from the Second Division (1955–56) and five second-place finishes in the First Division, two FA Cup final defeats and one Inter-Cities Fairs Cup final defeat. His 629 league and 762 total competitive appearances are club records. In 2006, Leeds United supporters voted Charlton into the club's greatest ever XI.Called up to the England team days before his 30th birthday, Charlton went on to score six goals in 35 international games and to appear in two World Cups and one European Championship. He played in the World Cup final victory over West Germany in 1966, and also helped England to finish third in Euro 1968 and to win four British Home Championship tournaments. He was named FWA Footballer of the Year in 1967.

After retiring as a player he worked as a manager, and led Middlesbrough to the Second Division title in 1973–74, winning the Manager of the Year award in his first season as a manager. He kept Boro as a stable top-flight club before he resigned in April 1977. He took charge of Sheffield Wednesday in October 1977, and led the club to promotion out of the Third Division in 1979–80. He left the Owls in May 1983, and went on to serve Middlesbrough as caretaker-manager at the end of the 1983–84 season. He worked as Newcastle United manager for the 1984–85 season. He took charge of the Republic of Ireland national team in February 1986, and led them to their first ever World Cup in 1990, where they reached the quarter-finals. He also led the nation to successful qualification to Euro 1988 and the 1994 World Cup. He resigned in January 1996 and went into retirement. He is married with three children.

Jim Standen

James Alfred Standen (born 30 May 1935) is an English former professional footballer who played as a goalkeeper in the Football League for Arsenal, Luton Town, West Ham United, Millwall and Portsmouth. He won the FA Cup and the European Cup Winners' Cup with West Ham. Standen was also a professional cricketer for Worcestershire, where he won a County Championship.

Johnny Giles

Michael John Giles (born 6 November 1940) is an Irish former association football player and manager best remembered for his time as a midfielder with Leeds United in the 1960s and 1970s. After retiring from management in 1985, Giles served as the senior analyst on RTÉ Sport's coverage of association football from 1986 until 2016. The FAI voted Giles as the greatest Irish player of the last 50 years at the UEFA Jubilee Awards in 2004.

After winning an FA Cup winner's medal under Matt Busby at Manchester United, Giles moved to Leeds in 1963 where he played in midfield alongside captain Billy Bremner. The duo went on to form a central midfield partnership which was one of the best in English club football. Their pairing helped yield several major trophies in the most successful era in Leeds' history. By a strange coincidence, Giles and Bremner would both score exactly 115 goals for the club.

In his later years in football, Giles pursued a managerial career which saw him installed as player-manager and manager of, among others, West Bromwich Albion, the Republic of Ireland, Vancouver Whitecaps and Shamrock Rovers. Despite having an outstanding knowledge of the game, Giles personally never liked being a manager. He became disillusioned with aspects of the job, such as suffering at the hands of non-committal boardrooms, and left management permanently in 1985. He later declared that he had no regrets about quitting managerial life.Subsequently, after repeated encouragement from childhood friend Eamon Dunphy, Giles would inadvertently enter the world of football punditry in 1986. He has since gone on to establish himself as a senior analyst on RTÉ Sport. In addition, he writes two columns per week for the Irish Evening Herald newspaper, and offers his opinions about the game on radio station, Newstalk 106.

Paul Madeley

Paul Edward Madeley (20 September 1944 – 23 July 2018) was an English footballer, who played for Leeds United and the England national team. During his career with Leeds, Madeley played in a variety of different playing positions which led to him being described as a utility player. Madeley made more than 500 appearances for Leeds in the Football League and appeared in 24 internationals for England between 1971 and 1977.

Paul Reaney

Paul Reaney (born 22 October 1944, in Fulham, London) is a former footballer for Leeds United, Bradford City and England, primarily as a right sided full-back.

Tony Singleton

Anthony Joseph "Tony" Singleton (30 March 1936 – 29 February 2008) was an English footballer who played as a centre half for Preston North End and New York Generals.

Singleton signed for his hometown club in May 1955, and made his first-team debut in 1960.

In the semi-final of Preston's run in the 1963-64 FA Cup, with the score level at 1-1 against Swansea City, Singleton scored a rare goal from 30 yards to win the game and send Preston to the final, where they lost to West Ham United.

Westbury United F.C.

Westbury United Football Club are a football club based at Meadow Lane, Westbury, Wiltshire, England. Their first team plays in the Western League and in 2017–18 won promotion from the First Division to the Premier Division.

Seasons
Qualifying rounds
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FA competitions
Football League
Lower leagues
European competitions
Related to national team
196364 in European football (UEFA)
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