1962 NFL season

The 1962 NFL season was the 43rd regular season of the National Football League (NFL). Before the season, CBS signed a contract with the league to televise all regular-season games for a $4.65 million annual fee.

The season ended on December 30, when the Green Bay Packers defeated the New York Giants 16–7 in the NFL championship game at Yankee Stadium. The Packers successfully defended their 1961 NFL title, finishing the 1962 season at 14–1; their only loss was to the Detroit Lions on Thanksgiving Day at Tiger Stadium.

1962 National Football League season
Regular season
DurationSeptember 15 –
December 30, 1962
East ChampionsNew York Giants
West ChampionsGreen Bay Packers
Championship Game
ChampionsGreen Bay Packers

Major rule changes

  • Grabbing any player's facemask is prohibited.

Conference races

The Green Bay Packers won their first ten games, until losing 26–14 on November 22 at Detroit. The Lions' win put them a game behind the Pack rather than 2 games behind, but in the final week, they lost to Chicago, 3–0. Even a Lions win would have been made moot when Green Bay's won 20–17 at L.A. to finish with a record of 13–1.

In the Eastern conference, the Redskins were unbeaten after six games. Their four wins and two ties would have been an .833 record in later years, but in 1962, a tie game wasn't counted at all. In Week Seven (October 28), the Giants handed the Skins their first loss, 49–34. When Washington lost again the next week, 38–10 to Dallas, the Giants 31–28 win over St. Louis gave them a 6–2 record and the conference lead. The Giants rode a nine-game winning streak to capture the Eastern title and the right to host the title game against Green Bay.

Week Western Conference Record Eastern Conference Record
1 4 teams (Bal, Chi, Det, GB) 1–0–0 Tie (Cle, St.L) 1–0–0
2 4 teams (Bal, Chi, Det, GB) 2–0–0 Washington Redskins 1–0–1
3 Tie (Det, GB) 3–0–0 Washington Redskins 2–0–1
4 Green Bay Packers 4–0–0 Washington Redskins 3–0–1
5 Green Bay Packers 5–0–0 Washington Redskins 3–0–2
6 Green Bay Packers 6–0–0 Washington Redskins 4–0–2
7 Green Bay Packers 7–0–0 Washington Redskins 4–1–2
8 Green Bay Packers 8–0–0 New York Giants 6–2–0
9 Green Bay Packers 9–0–0 New York Giants 7–2–0
10 Green Bay Packers 10–0–0 New York Giants 8–2–0
11 Green Bay Packers 10–1–0 New York Giants 9–2–0
12 Green Bay Packers 11–1–0 New York Giants 10–2–0
13 Green Bay Packers 12–1–0 New York Giants 11–2–0
14 Green Bay Packers 13–1–0 New York Giants 12–2–0

Final standings

W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties, PCT= Winning Percentage, PF= Points For, PA = Points Against

Note: Prior to 1972, the NFL did not include tie games when calculating a team's winning percentage in the official standings

Eastern Conference
Team W L T PCT PF PA
New York Giants 12 2 0 .857 398 283
Pittsburgh Steelers 9 5 0 .643 312 363
Cleveland Browns 7 6 1 .538 291 257
Washington Redskins 5 7 2 .417 305 376
Dallas Cowboys 5 8 1 .385 398 402
St. Louis Cardinals 4 9 1 .308 287 361
Philadelphia Eagles 3 10 1 .231 282 356
Western Conference
Team W L T PCT PF PA
Green Bay Packers 13 1 0 .929 415 148
Detroit Lions 11 3 0 .786 315 177
Chicago Bears 9 5 0 .643 321 287
Baltimore Colts 7 7 0 .500 293 288
San Francisco 49ers 6 8 0 .429 282 331
Minnesota Vikings 2 11 1 .154 254 410
Los Angeles Rams 1 12 1 .077 220 334

NFL Championship Game

Playoff Bowl

The Playoff Bowl was between the conference runners-up, for third place in the league. This was its third year (of ten) and it was played a week after the title game.

Awards

Most Valuable Player Jim Taylor, Fullback, Green Bay
Coach of the Year Allie Sherman, New York Giants

Draft

The 1962 NFL Draft was held on December 4, 1961 at Chicago's Sheraton Hotel & Towers. With the first pick, the Washington Redskins selected back Ernie Davis from Syracuse University.

Coaches

Eastern Conference

Western Conference

See also

References

  • NFL Record and Fact Book (ISBN 1-932994-36-X)
  • NFL History 1961–1970 (Last accessed December 4, 2005)
  • Total Football: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League (ISBN 0-06-270174-6)
1962 Dallas Cowboys season

The 1962 Dallas Cowboys season was their third in the league. The team finished with a record of 5 wins, 8 losses, and 1 tie, placing them 5th in the NFL's Eastern Conference.

1962 NFL Championship Game

The 1962 National Football League Championship Game was the 30th NFL title game, played on December 30 at Yankee Stadium in New York City. It matched the New York Giants (12–2) of the Eastern Conference and Green Bay Packers (13–1) of the Western Conference, the defending league champions.The Packers were led by hall of fame head coach Vince Lombardi, in his fourth year, and the Giants by Allie Sherman, in his second season. Green Bay was favored by 6½ points. The attendance for the game was 64,892, and the weather during the game was so cold that television crews used bonfires to thaw out their cameras, and one cameraman suffered frostbite. The conditions also made throwing the ball difficult.

Green Bay won 16–7, behind the performances of game Most Valuable Player linebacker Ray Nitschke, and fullback Jim Taylor. Right guard Jerry Kramer, filling in as placekicker for the injured Paul Hornung, scored ten points with three field goals and an extra point. The Giants fumbled twice, with Nitschke recovering both for the Packers, while the Packers recovered all five of their own fumbles and intercepted a Giants pass.This was the third and final NFL title game played at Yankee Stadium; the others were in 1956 and 1958, with the Giants winning the first. There would not be another NFL title game in greater New York City for 51 seasons until Super Bowl XLVIII, which was played February 2, 2014 at MetLife Stadium and resulted in the Seattle Seahawks defeating the Denver Broncos 43-8. Previous championship games hosted by the Giants in New York were played across the Harlem River at the Polo Grounds in 1934, 1938, 1944, and 1946; the Giants won the first two. An additional title game was played at the Polo Grounds in 1936, hosted by the Boston Redskins and won by the Packers.

Charley Winner

Charley Winner (born July 2, 1924) is a former a football coach whose professional and personal life was closely intertwined with that of Weeb Ewbank, another coach.

Winner was born in Somerville, New Jersey and, during World War II, flew 17 missions in a B-17 Flying Fortress plane, spending six weeks in a German prisoner of war camp. Upon his release from the service he played running back at Washington University in St. Louis, where Ewbank was head coach. After Ewbank moved on to coach for the Cleveland Browns, Winner took an assistant position with the nearby Case Tech Rough Riders, present-day Case Western Reserve University, while also serving as a scout for the Cleveland Browns. In 1950, he married Ewbank's daughter. When Ewbank was hired as head coach of the Baltimore Colts in 1954, Winner went along and helped the team capture NFL titles in both 1958 and 1959. At the conclusion of the 1962 NFL season, Ewbank was dismissed, but Winner stayed under new coach Don Shula from 1963 to 1965.

On February 10, 1966, Winner was hired as head coach of the St. Louis Cardinals. In five seasons at the helm, Winner managed a 35-30-5 record, but after failing to reach the postseason, was fired on January 6, 1971. The Cardinals posted winning records in three of Winner's five seasons with the Cardinals, but fell short of the playoffs each time. In 1966 the Cardinals started out 5-0 but lost four of their last five games to finish at 8-5-1 and in fourth place in the NFL East. In 1968 St. Louis finished one-half game behind the Cleveland Browns (9-4-1 to 10-4) in the NFL Century Division despite sweeping both regular-season meetings with the Browns. In 1970 St. Louis rolled to an 8-2-1 record at the end of November, including three consecutive shutouts over the Houston Oilers (44-0), Boston Patriots (31-0) and Dallas Cowboys (38-0 on Monday Night Football in Dallas). With the NFC East championship in sight, however, the Cardinals stumbled in December, losing to the Detroit Lions, New York Giants and Washington Redskins to finish at 8-5-1 and in third place in the division behind Dallas and the Giants.

Winner was soon hired by George Allen of the Washington Redskins. Winner worked two years for the Redskins, helping them reach the NFL playoffs during each season and their first Super Bowl berth ever in 1972. On February 1, 1973 he rejoined Ewbank as an assistant with the Jets and was also designated his successor following the end of the 1973 NFL season. Winner struggled to achieve success with the Jets, finishing 7-7 in 1974, needing to win the season's final six games to reach the .500 mark. The following year saw the team win only two of the first nine games, a decline that resulted in his dismissal on November 19, three days after a 52-19 loss to the Colts.

Two months later, Winner was hired as an assistant with the Cincinnati Bengals, spending the next four years with the team before once again being fired following the 1979 NFL season. Renewing acquaintances with Don Shula in 1981, Winner was hired to serve as player personnel director for the Miami Dolphins. He spent two years in that role before shifting to pro personnel, performing many of the same duties as a general manager, especially negotiating player contracts. On June 1, 1992, he announced his retirement.

Don McCafferty

Donald William McCafferty (March 12, 1921 – July 28, 1974) was an American football player and coach who, in his first year as head coach of the Baltimore Colts, led the team to a victory in Super Bowl V, and became the first rookie head coach to win the Super Bowl.

Hamp Pool

Hampton John "Hamp" Pool (March 11, 1915 – May 26, 2000) was an American football player, coach and scout who was part of two National Football League (NFL) championship teams during his playing career and served as head coach for three professional teams.

Herman Ball

Herman Ball (May 9, 1910 – January 12, 1999) was a football player and coach who was a long-time assistant in the National Football League and served as head coach of the Washington Redskins from 1949 to 1951.

A native of Elkins, West Virginia, Ball attended Davis & Elkins College for three years beginning in 1932, helping the 1933 squad finish the season as the highest scoring team in college football with 345 points. Following his graduation, his first coaching position came in his home state as head coach at Ridgeley High School.

The following year, he moved south to begin a seven-year stint in Cumberland, Maryland, as head coach at Allegany High School. In his inaugural season at the helm, Allegany finished undefeated, the first of three spotless campaigns during his tenure, the others coming in 1940 and 1941. By the time he departed for the University of Maryland in 1943, he had compiled an impressive mark of 56-13-1.

Ball became an assistant with the Terrapins' football team, and also helped coach the school's baseball and basketball teams. During his third and final year in that role, he worked under the legendary Bear Bryant. Ball also worked part-time as a scout for the Redskins during the 1945 season, then joined the team the following year when he was hired as line coach.

On November 7, 1949, Redskins' first-year head coach John Whelchel was dismissed with the team sporting a 3-3-1 mark, with Ball being elevated to the position. In the team's final five games, Ball managed only one more win, then struggled the next year with a 3-9 mark, the worst record ever (at the time) for the franchise. Despite the miserable fortunes of the team, due in part to Ball's attempt at balancing the team's offensive attack with more of a running game, player loyalty and fan popularity helped Ball earn another year on the sidelines.

That term would be a short one when the Redskins began the 1951 NFL season with an 0-3 start. Ball was fired on October 18, a decision that helped bring about a bizarre situation in which his successor, former Bears assistant Hunk Anderson, was announced as Washington's new head coach, but was prevented from starting his new job because of contract issues with Chicago's George Halas. After refusing to provide compensation for Anderson, Redskin owner George Preston Marshall hired Ball's assistant, Dick Todd.

Serving as Washington's chief scout, Ball also returned to the sidelines as a Redskins' assistant until he resigned on December 17, 1954. He was hired three weeks later as an assistant coach for the Pittsburgh Steelers, spending one season in the Steel City until taking a similar position on February 2, 1956, under Weeb Ewbank with the Baltimore Colts.

Over the next seven years, Ball would help the team capture consecutive NFL titles in 1958 and 1959. When Don Shula replaced Ewbank after the 1962 NFL season, Ball was dismissed and signed as offensive line coach of the American Football League's Buffalo Bills on February 9, 1963. He spent one year there until returning to the NFL when former Redskins head coach Joe Kuharich took over the same role with the Philadelphia Eagles.

In five seasons, the team's best finish was in 1966, when they finished 9-5 and competed in the Playoff Bowl, but following a 2-12 finish in 1968, Kuharich and his staff were fired, although Ball remained as the team's director of player personnel. He remained in that role until announcing his retirement on December 23, 1977, staying on as a consultant until the end of the 1986 NFL season.

He died at the age of 88 at a Paoli, Pennsylvania, hospital of complications from a heart ailment.

John Sutro (American football)

John Sutro (born John Robert Sutro) is a former player in the National Football League. He played with the San Francisco 49ers during the 1962 NFL season.

NFL Kickoff Game

The National Football League Kickoff game, along with related festivities, marks the official start of the National Football League (NFL) regular season. A single game is held, preceded by a concert and other ceremonies. This first game of the season is usually scheduled for the Thursday following Labor Day and since 2004, it was hosted by the current Super Bowl champions. However, in 2012, the game was moved to Wednesday to prevent conflicts with the acceptance speech of the Democratic National Convention. The remainder of the league plays their opening weekend games the following Sunday and Monday.

The Kickoff Game was introduced in the 2002 season. From 2004 onward, the defending Super Bowl champion has played in the kickoff game every year, and hosted the game in all but one year (2013 being the lone exception, in which the champion played on the road because of a parking conflict).

Oscar Donahue

Oscar Donahue is a former wide receiver in the National Football League. He played with the Minnesota Vikings during the 1962 NFL season.

Ron Miller (American football)

Ron Miller is a former quarterback in the National Football League. Miller was drafted in the third round of the 1961 NFL Draft by the Los Angeles Rams and later played with the team during the 1962 NFL season. He was also drafted in the twenty-first round of the 1961 American Football League Draft by the Houston Oilers.

Steelmark

The Steelmark is a logo representing steel and the steel industry owned by the American Iron and Steel Institute, and used by it to promote the product and its manufacturers.

The logo was incorporated as the emblem of the Pittsburgh Steelers, initially using the same design as the Steelmark, but later modified to include the team's full name.

1962 NFL season
Early era
(1920–1969)
Modern era
(1970–present)

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