1962–63 FA Cup

The 1962–63 FA Cup was the 82nd staging of the world's oldest football cup competition, the Football Association Challenge Cup, commonly known as the FA Cup. Manchester United won the competition for only the third time, beating Leicester City 3–1 in the final at Wembley.

Matches were scheduled to be played at the stadium of the team named first on the date specified for each round, which was always a Saturday. Some matches, however, might be rescheduled for other days if there were clashes with games for other competitions or the weather was inclement. If scores were level after 90 minutes had been played, a replay would take place at the stadium of the second-named team later the same week. If the replayed match was drawn further replays would be held until a winner was determined. If scores were level after 90 minutes had been played in a replay, a 30-minute period of extra time would be played.

1962–63 FA Cup
Country England
 Wales
Defending championsTottenham Hotspur
ChampionsManchester United
(3rd title)
Runners-upLeicester City

Calendar

Round Date Postponed date
First Qualifying Round Saturday 8 September 1962
Second Qualifying Round Saturday 22 September 1962
Third Qualifying Round Saturday 6 October 1962
Fourth Qualifying Round Saturday 20 October 1962
First Round Proper Saturday 3 November 1962
Second Round Saturday 24 November 1962
Third Round Saturday 5 January 1963
Fourth Round Saturday 26 January 1963
Fifth Round Saturday 16 February 1963 16 March
Sixth Round Saturday 9 March 1963 30 March
Semi Finals Saturday 30 March 1963 27 April
Final Saturday 4 May 1963 25 May

Results

First Round Proper

At this stage clubs from the Football League Third and Fourth Divisions joined those non-league clubs having come through the qualifying rounds. Matches were scheduled to be played on Saturday, 3 November 1962. Nine were drawn and went to replays.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Andover 0–1 Gillingham 3 November 1962
2 Chester 0–2 Tranmere Rovers 3 November 1962
3 Chesterfield 4–1 Stockport County 3 November 1962
4 Bristol City 4–2 Wellington Town 3 November 1962
5 Watford 2–2 Poole Town 3 November 1962
Replay Poole Town 1–2 Watford 6 November 1962
6 Yeovil Town 3–2 Dartford 3 November 1962
7 Notts County 0–3 Peterborough United 3 November 1962
8 Crewe Alexandra 1–1 Scarborough 3 November 1962
Replay Scarborough 2–3 Crewe Alexandra 7 November 1962
9 Lincoln City 1–1 Darlington 3 November 1962
Replay Darlington 1–2 Lincoln City 7 November 1962
10 Swindon Town 4–2 Reading 3 November 1962
11 Buxton 2–2 Barrow 3 November 1962
Replay Barrow 3–1 Buxton 5 November 1962
12 Queens Park Rangers 3–2 Newport County 3 November 1962
13 Barnsley 4–0 Rhyl 3 November 1962
14 Bristol Rovers 0–2 Port Vale 3 November 1962
15 Northampton Town 1–2 Torquay United 3 November 1962
16 Coventry City 1–0 Bournemouth 3 November 1962
17 Millwall 3–1 Margate 3 November 1962
18 Hull City 5–4 Crook Town 3 November 1962
19 Carlisle United 2–1 Hartlepools United 3 November 1962
20 Oldham Athletic 2–5 Bradford City 3 November 1962
21 Crystal Palace 2–0 Hereford United 3 November 1962
22 Wimbledon 2–1 Colchester United 3 November 1962
23 Southend United 2–1 Brighton & Hove Albion 3 November 1962
24 Blyth Spartans 2–1 Morecambe 3 November 1962
25 Bedford Town 2–1 Cambridge United 3 November 1962
26 Halifax Town 1–0 Bradford Park Avenue 3 November 1962
27 Cheltenham Town 3–6 Enfield 3 November 1962
28 Southport 1–1 Wrexham 3 November 1962
Replay Wrexham 3–2 Southport 7 November 1962
29 Maidenhead United 0–3 Wycombe Wanderers 3 November 1962
30 York City 0–0 Rochdale 3 November 1962
Replay Rochdale 1–2 York City 6 November 1962
31 Aldershot 1–0 Brentford 3 November 1962
32 Gateshead 2–1 Wigan Athletic 3 November 1962
33 North Shields 2–2 Workington 3 November 1962
Replay Workington 7–2 North Shields 8 November 1962
34 Hounslow Town 3–3 Mansfield Town 3 November 1962
Replay Mansfield Town 9–2 Hounslow Town 5 November 1962
35 Boston United 1–2 King's Lynn 3 November 1962
36 South Shields 0–0 Doncaster Rovers 3 November 1962
Replay Doncaster Rovers 2–1 South Shields 8 November 1962
37 Chelmsford City 2–6 Shrewsbury Town 3 November 1962
38 Gravesend & Northfleet 3–2 Exeter City 3 November 1962
39 Hinckley Athletic 3–0 Sittingbourne 3 November 1962
40 Falmouth Town 1–2 Oxford United 3 November 1962

Second Round

The matches were scheduled for Saturday, 24 November 1962. Two matches were drawn, with replays taking place later the same week.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Bristol City 2–1 Wimbledon 24 November 1962
2 Yeovil Town 0–2 Swindon Town 24 November 1962
3 Gillingham 3–0 Bedford Town 24 November 1962
4 Lincoln City 1–0 Halifax Town 24 November 1962
5 Shrewsbury Town 2–1 Torquay United 24 November 1962
6 Doncaster Rovers 1–4 Tranmere Rovers 24 November 1962
7 Wrexham 5–2 Barrow 24 November 1962
8 Queens Park Rangers 7–2 Hinckley Athletic 24 November 1962
9 Barnsley 2–1 Chesterfield 24 November 1962
10 King's Lynn 1–2 Oxford United 24 November 1962
11 Bradford City 3–2 Gateshead 24 November 1962
12 Millwall 0–0 Coventry City 24 November 1962
Replay Coventry City 2–1 Millwall 27 November 1962
13 Hull City 2–0 Workington 24 November 1962
14 Crystal Palace 2–2 Mansfield Town 24 November 1962
Replay Mansfield Town 7–2 Crystal Palace 26 November 1962
15 Southend United 0–2 Watford 24 November 1962
16 Blyth Spartans 0–2 Carlisle United 24 November 1962
17 Port Vale 2–0 Aldershot 24 November 1962
18 York City 2–1 Crewe Alexandra 24 November 1962
19 Peterborough United 1–0 Enfield 24 November 1962
20 Gravesend & Northfleet 3–1 Wycombe Wanderers 24 November 1962

Third Round

The 44 First and Second Division clubs entered the competition at this stage. The matches were scheduled for Saturday, 5 January 1963, but due to the Big Freeze of 1963, only three games were completed at this date.[1][2] The bulk of matches were not completable until February and March, with the final non-replay tie being played on the 7 March. There were nine replays in total, of which the earliest possible playing date was 30 January, and the latest the 11 March.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Bristol City 1–1 Aston Villa 16 January 1963
Replay Aston Villa 3–2 Bristol City 7 March 1963
2 Preston North End 1–4 Sunderland 5 January 1963
3 Southampton 5–0 York City 13 February 1963
4 Watford 2–0 Rotherham United 20 February 1963
5 Walsall 0–1 Manchester City 6 March 1963
6 Gillingham 2–4 Port Vale 27 February 1963
7 Nottingham Forest 4–3 Wolverhampton Wanderers 29 January 1963
8 Blackburn Rovers 1–1 Middlesbrough 5 March 1963
Replay Middlesbrough 3–1 Blackburn Rovers 11 March 1963
9 Grimsby Town 1–3 Leicester City 8 January 1963
10 Derby County 2–0 Peterborough United 4 February 1963
11 Lincoln City 1–5 Coventry City 6 March 1963
12 Luton Town 0–2 Swindon Town 26 January 1963
13 Shrewsbury Town 1–1 Sheffield Wednesday 21 February 1963
Replay Sheffield Wednesday 2–1 Shrewsbury Town 7 March 1963
14 Wrexham 0–3 Liverpool 9 January 1963
15 Sheffield United 3–1 Bolton Wanderers 6 March 1963
16 Tranmere Rovers 2–2 Chelsea 5 January 1963
Replay Chelsea 3–1 Tranmere Rovers 30 January 1963
17 Tottenham Hotspur 0–3 Burnley 16 January 1963
18 Barnsley 0–3 Everton 15 January 1963
19 Portsmouth 1–1 Scunthorpe United 26 January 1963
Replay Scunthorpe United 1–2 Portsmouth 7 March 1963
20 West Ham United 0–0 Fulham 4 February 1963
Replay Fulham 1–2 West Ham United 20 February 1963
21 Manchester United 5–0 Huddersfield Town 4 March 1963
22 Norwich City 1–1 Blackpool 4 March 1963
Replay Blackpool 1–3 Norwich City 6 March 1963
23 Plymouth Argyle 1–5 West Bromwich Albion 5 January 1963
24 Bradford City 1–6 Newcastle United 7 March 1963
25 Carlisle United 0–1 Gravesend & Northfleet 29 January 1963
26 Mansfield Town 2–3 Ipswich Town 9 January 1963
27 Swansea Town 2–0 Queens Park Rangers 26 January 1963
28 Charlton Athletic 1–0 Cardiff City 18 February 1963
29 Arsenal 5–1 Oxford United 30 January 1963
30 Leeds United 3–1 Stoke City 6 March 1963
31 Birmingham City 3–3 Bury 5 March 1963
Replay Bury 2–0 Birmingham City 7 March 1963
32 Leyton Orient 1–1 Hull City 11 February 1963
Replay Hull City 0–2 Leyton Orient 19 February 1963

Fourth Round

The matches were originally scheduled for Saturday, 26 January 1963, but due to the earlier, ongoing problems with the winter of 1963, most of the third-round games had still not been played and only one tie, the Burnley – Liverpool match, was able to be played on that day. This and three other games went to a replay, with the Portsmouth – Coventry City match requiring a second replay, which was the last match of the round.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Burnley 1–1 Liverpool 26 January 1963
Replay Liverpool 2–1 Burnley 20 February 1963
2 Southampton 3–1 Watford 27 February 1963
3 Leicester City 3–1 Ipswich Town 30 January 1963
4 Middlesbrough 0–2 Leeds United 16 March 1963
5 West Bromwich Albion 0–0 Nottingham Forest 6 March 1963
Replay Nottingham Forest 2–1 West Bromwich Albion 11 March 1963
6 Swindon Town 1–5 Everton 29 January 1963
7 Manchester City 1–0 Bury 13 March 1963
8 Portsmouth 1–1 Coventry City 13 March 1963
Replay Coventry City 2–2 Portsmouth 16 March 1963
Replay Portsmouth 1–2 Coventry City 19 March 1963
9 West Ham United 1–0 Swansea Town 4 March 1963
10 Manchester United 1–0 Aston Villa 11 March 1963
11 Norwich City 5–0 Newcastle United 13 March 1963
12 Port Vale 1–2 Sheffield United 13 March 1963
13 Charlton Athletic 0–3 Chelsea 6 March 1963
14 Arsenal 2–0 Sheffield Wednesday 12 March 1963
15 Leyton Orient 3–0 Derby County 4 March 1963
16 Gravesend & Northfleet 1–1 Sunderland 12 February 1963
Replay Sunderland 5–2 Gravesend & Northfleet 18 February 1963

Fifth Round

The matches were originally scheduled for Saturday, 16 February 1963, but the delays of the matches in the third and fourth rounds prevented the fifth round ties from being played until much later. On 28 January, the FA announced that the draw for the fifth round would be put back a week, and that the league season would be extended until 19 May.[3] Faced with the problem of wishing all the ties to take place on the same date, the FA decided on 4 February 1963 that the fifth and sixth rounds would each be postponed by a week to 23 February and 16 March respectively[4] The following week, on 12 February, the FA again decided, due to the lack of completion of many games, that the fifth and sixth rounds should be postponed[5] The agreed dates, Saturday 16 March and Saturday 30 March respectively, were the final postponements of these two rounds. There were no replays, but the Nottingham Forest and Leeds United match did not take place until the following Tuesday, while the Coventry City – Sunderland game was played on the 25th.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Southampton 1–0 Sheffield United 16 March 1963
2 Nottingham Forest 3–0 Leeds United 19 March 1963
3 Manchester City 1–2 Norwich City 16 March 1963
4 Coventry City 2–1 Sunderland 25 March 1963
5 West Ham United 1–0 Everton 16 March 1963
6 Manchester United 2–1 Chelsea 16 March 1963
7 Arsenal 1–2 Liverpool 16 March 1963
8 Leyton Orient 0–1 Leicester City 16 March 1963

Sixth Round

The four quarter-final ties were scheduled to be played on Saturday, 9 March 1963, but as explained above, were postponed until the 30 March. The Nottingham Forest–Southampton match went to two replays before the tie was settled, in Southampton's favour.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Liverpool 1–0 West Ham United 30 March 1963
2 Nottingham Forest 1–1 Southampton 30 March 1963
Replay Southampton 3–3 Nottingham Forest 3 April 1963
Replay Nottingham Forest 0–5 Southampton 8 April 1963
3 Coventry City 1–3 Manchester United 30 March 1963
4 Norwich City 0–2 Leicester City 30 March 1963

Semi finals

The semi-final matches were originally scheduled to be played on Saturday, 30 March 1963. However, due to the problems of completing the earlier rounds due to the particularly inclement weather, on 18 February 1963 the FA Challenge Cup committee announced that the semi finals would be put back by four weeks to 27 April, and that the final would not be played until three weeks after its original date, on 25 May.[6] Leicester City and Manchester United came through the semi final round to meet at Wembley.

Leicester City1–0Liverpool
Stringfellow Goal 20' Report
Manchester United1–0Southampton
Law Goal 56' Report

Final

The 1963 FA Cup Final was a football match played on 25 May 1963 at Wembley. The final was contested by Manchester United and Leicester City. United won 3–1, with goals by Denis Law and David Herd (2). Ken Keyworth scored the Foxes' goal.

Match details

Manchester United3 – 1Leicester City
Law Goal 30'
Herd Goal 57' Goal 85'
Keyworth Goal 80'
Manchester United
Leicester City

References

General
Specific
  1. ^ "The Times Archive". London: Times Newspapers Ltd. 1963-01-07. Retrieved 2008-09-09.
  2. ^ "Replay The Big Freeze 1962-63". Findarticles.com website. CNET Networks, Inc (Article originally published by The Independent on Sunday). 2003-01-19. Retrieved 2008-09-14.
  3. ^ "The Times Archive". London: Times Newspapers Ltd. 1963-01-29. Retrieved 2008-09-09.
  4. ^ "The Times Archive". London: Times Newspapers Ltd. 1963-02-05. Retrieved 2008-09-09.
  5. ^ "The Times Archive". London: Times Newspapers Ltd. 1963-02-13. Retrieved 2008-09-09.
  6. ^ "The Times Archive". London: Times Newspapers Ltd. 1963-02-19. Retrieved 2008-09-09.
1962 FA Charity Shield

The 1962 FA Charity Shield was the 40th FA Charity Shield, an annual football match played between the winners of the previous season's Football League and FA Cup competitions. The match took place on 11 August 1962 at Portman Road in Ipswich, and played between 1961–62 Football League champions Ipswich Town and FA Cup winners Tottenham Hotspur. It ended in a 5–1 victory for Tottenham Hotspur.

1962–63 Birmingham City F.C. season

The 1962–63 Football League season was Birmingham City Football Club's 60th in the Football League and their 36th in the First Division. They finished in 20th position in the 22-team division, two points clear of the relegation places. They entered the 1962–63 FA Cup at the third round proper and lost in that round to Bury after a replay. They entered the League Cup at the second round and reached the final, in which they defeated local rivals Aston Villa 3–1 on aggregate score to win the first (and, until 2011, only) major trophy in their history.

Because of the severe winter weather – the so-called "Big Freeze of 1963" – Birmingham played no matches for ten weeks, between 22 December and 2 March. Their third-round FA Cup-tie was played in the first week of March, two months later than the usual date of the first weekend in January.

Twenty-three players made at least one appearance in nationally organised first-team competition, and there were eleven different goalscorers. Half back Terry Hennessey played in 52 of the 53 first-team matches over the season (forwards Ken Leek and Mike Hellawell missed only two), and Leek finished as leading goalscorer with 29 goals, of which 20 were scored in league competition.

1962–63 FA Cup qualifying rounds

The FA Cup 1962–63 is the 82nd season of the world's oldest football knockout competition; The Football Association Challenge Cup, or FA Cup for short. The large number of clubs entering the tournament from lower down the English football league system meant that the competition started with a number of preliminary and qualifying rounds. The 30 victorious teams from the Fourth Round Qualifying progressed to the First Round Proper.

1963 FA Charity Shield

The 1963 FA Charity Shield was the 41st FA Charity Shield, an annual football match held between the winners of the previous season's Football League and FA Cup competitions. The match was contested by Everton who had won the 1962–63 Football League, and Manchester United, who had won the 1962–63 FA Cup, at Goodison Park, Liverpool, on 17 August 1963. Everton won the match 4–0, with goals from Jimmy Gabriel, Dennis Stevens, Derek Temple and a penalty from Roy Vernon.

1963 FA Cup Final

The 1963 FA Cup Final was the final of the 1962–63 FA Cup, the 82nd season of England's premier club football competition. The match was played at Wembley Stadium (which was fully roofed for the first time) on 25 May 1963 and contested by Manchester United and Leicester City. United won 3–1, with a goal from Denis Law and two from David Herd, lifting the trophy for the third time, while City had now played in three FA Cup finals and had still yet to win the trophy. Ken Keyworth scored the consolation goal for Leicester.

Bob McNicol

Robert Hugh McNicol (13 February 1933 – 25 April 1980) was a Scottish professional footballer who played as a full back. He made 56 Scottish League appearances for Stirling Albion and 228 in the English Football League playing for Accrington Stanley, Brighton & Hove Albion and Carlisle United.

Carrow Road

Carrow Road is an association football stadium located in Norwich, Norfolk, England, and is the home of Norwich City Football Club. The stadium is located toward the east of the city, not far from Norwich railway station and the River Wensum.

The club originally played at Newmarket Road before moving to The Nest. When The Nest was deemed inadequate for the size of crowds it was attracting, the Carrow Road ground, named after the road on which it is located, was purpose-built by Norwich City in just 82 days and opened on 31 August 1935.

The stadium has been altered and upgraded several times during its history, notably following a fire that destroyed the old City Stand in 1984. Having once accommodated standing supporters, the ground has been all-seater since 1992. The ground's current capacity is 27,244, the most recent works being the addition of approximately 1,000 seats in the summer of 2010. The stadium's record attendance since becoming an all-seater ground is 27,137, set during a Premier League match versus Newcastle United on 2 April 2016. In the days when fans could stand on terraces, Carrow Road saw a crowd of 43,984 when hosting Leicester City for an FA Cup match in 1963.

Carrow Road has also hosted under-21 international football and a number of concerts, including performances by Elton John and George Michael. The Carrow Road site includes catering facilities and a Holiday Inn hotel offering rooms with views of the pitch.

David Herd (footballer)

David George Herd (15 April 1934 – 1 October 2016) was a Scottish international footballer who played for Arsenal, Manchester United, Stockport County, and Stoke City. His regular position was as a forward where he was a consistent goal scorer.

Jimmy Gabriel

James Gabriel (born 10 October 1940) is a Scottish former football midfielder, who earned two caps with the Scotland national football team. Chiefly associated with English club Everton, Gabriel played extensively in Scotland and England before ending his career with the Seattle Sounders of the North American Soccer League. He then became a coach in both England and the USA, where he lives today.

Manchester United F.C. in European football

Manchester United Football Club is an English football club based in Old Trafford, Greater Manchester. They were the first English club to enter European competition, entering the European Cup in 1956. Since then, the club has competed in every UEFA-organised competition, with the exception of the now-defunct Intertoto Cup.

The competition in which the club has had the most success is the European Cup (now known as the UEFA Champions League); they have won three European Cups, the first of which came in 1968; this win made them the first English club to win the European Cup. The other two victories came in 1999 and 2008. The club has also won the Cup Winners' Cup, which they won in 1991; the Super Cup, also won in 1991; the Intercontinental Cup, which they won in 1999; and the Europa League, which they won in 2017.

After their Champions League wins in 1999 and 2008, Manchester United also competed as UEFA's representatives at the 2000 FIFA Club World Championship and the 2008 FIFA Club World Cup. They were knocked out of the 2000 tournament at the group stage, but went on to win the 2008 competition, becoming the first English side to do so.

Ray Snowball

Raymond Snowball (born 10 March 1932) is an English former amateur footballer who played as a goalkeeper in the Football League for Darlington. He is better known for his achievements while playing for Crook Town, with whom he won three FA Amateur Cups, in 1959, 1962 and 1964.

Wilf Birkett

Wilfred Birkett (26 June 1922 – 24 December 1993) was an English professional footballer who made nearly 200 appearances in the Football League playing as a goalkeeper for Southport and Shrewsbury Town.

Winter of 1962–63 in the United Kingdom

The winter of 1962–63, known as the Big Freeze of 1963, was one of the coldest winters (defined as the months of December, January and February) on record in the United Kingdom. Temperatures plummeted and lakes and rivers began to freeze over.

In the Central England Temperature(CET) record extending back to 1659, only the winters of 1683–84 and 1739–40 were colder than 1962–63.

The winter of 1962–63 remains the coldest since at least 1895 in all meteorological districts of the United Kingdom except Scotland North, where the two winters of 1978–79 and 2009–10 were colder.

Seasons
Qualifying rounds
Finals
FA competitions
Football League
Lower leagues
European competitions
Related to national team
196263 in European football (UEFA)
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