1958 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1958 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 25th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 8, 1958, at Memorial Stadium in Baltimore, Maryland, the home of the Baltimore Orioles of the American League.

This was the first Major League Baseball All-Star Game without an extra base hit.[1]

For this Diamond Jubilee game, the ceremonial first pitch was thrown by U.S. Vice President Richard Nixon, who became President 10 years later. The attendance was 48,829. The game was broadcast on the NBC television and radio networks.

The first hit of the game was by legendary center fielder Willie Mays.[2] The last scoring came in the sixth inning when the American League team took the lead after an error by third baseman Frank Thomas led to a single by Gil McDougald. Early Wynn was the winning pitcher as the American League scored a 4-3 victory.

Several players were named to the team but did not get into the game. These included Billy Pierce, Tony Kubek, Harvey Kuenn, Sherm Lollar, Rocky Bridges, Ryne Duren, Whitey Ford, and Elston Howard for the American League. For the National League team, Johnny Antonelli, Richie Ashburn, George Crowe, Eddie Mathews, Don McMahon, Walt Moryn, Johnny Podres, Bob Purkey, and Bob Schmidt were on the roster but did not play.

The next All-Star Game to be played in Baltimore was in 1993; that edition was aired on both CBS TV and radio, and played in Oriole Park at Camden Yards, with a special commemoration of this game's 35th anniversary.

1958 Major League Baseball All-Star Game
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
National League 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 4 2
American League 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 X 4 9 2
DateJuly 8, 1958
VenueMemorial Stadium
CityBaltimore, Maryland
Managers
Attendance48,829
Ceremonial first pitchRichard Nixon
TelevisionNBC
TV announcersMel Allen and Al Helfer
RadioNBC
Radio announcersBob Neal and Ernie Harwell

Opening Lineups

American League National League
Player Team Pos Player Team Pos
Nellie Fox Chicago White Sox  2B Willie Mays San Francisco Giants  CF
Mickey Mantle New York Yankees  CF Bob Skinner Pittsburgh Pirates  LF
Jackie Jensen Boston Red Sox  RF Stan Musial St. Louis Cardinals  1B
Bob Cerv Kansas City Athletics  LF Henry Aaron Milwaukee Braves  RF
Bill Skowron New York Yankees    1B Ernie Banks Chicago Cubs  SS
Frank Malzone Boston Red Sox  3B Frank Thomas Pittsburgh Pirates  3B
Gus Triandos Baltimore Orioles  C Bill Mazeroski Pittsburgh Pirates  2B
Luis Aparicio Chicago White Sox  SS Del Crandall Milwaukee Braves    C
Bob Turley New York Yankees    P Warren Spahn Milwaukee Braves    P

[3]

Umpires

Position Umpire
Home Plate Eddie Rommel (AL)
First Base Tom Gorman (NL)
Second Base Bill McKinley (AL)
Third Base Jocko Conlan (NL)
Left Field Frank Umont (AL)
Right Field Frank Secory (NL)

Line Score

Tuesday, July 8, 1958 1:00 pm (ET) at Memorial Stadium in Baltimore, Maryland
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
National League 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 4 2
American League 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 X 4 9 2
WP: Early Wynn (1–0)   LP: Bob Friend (0–1)   Sv: Billy O'Dell (1)

References

  1. ^ "1958 All-Star Game". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved April 20, 2010.
  2. ^ http://mlb.mlb.com/mlb/history/mlb_asgrecaps_story_headline.jsp?story_page=recap_1958
  3. ^ "Tuesday, July 8, 1958". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved April 20, 2010.
1958 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The Los Angeles Dodgers took the field before 78,672 fans at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on April 18, 1958, to usher in the beginning of the team's new life in Los Angeles. It was a rough season, as the Dodgers finished 21 games in back of the pennant-winning Milwaukee Braves in the National League standings, but it was the beginning of the second phase for the team. Vin Scully and company moved to KTTV (television) and KMPC (radio) from that year onward, and the Dodgers became one of the first teams that commenced Spanish language radio broadcasts for Latinos, with KWKW as the first station to offer a Spanish-language service.

1958 Milwaukee Braves season

The 1958 Milwaukee Braves season was the sixth in Milwaukee and the 88th overall season of the franchise. The Braves finished first in the National League with a 92–62 record and returned to the World Series for the second consecutive year, losing to the New York Yankees in seven games. The Braves set a Major League record which still stands for the fewest players caught stealing in a season, with 8.

1958 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1958 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 76th in franchise history. The Phillies finished the season in last place in the National League. It was the Phillies third losing season in five seasons, and their fourth losing season during the 1950s.

1959 Major League Baseball All-Star Game (first game)

The 1959 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 26th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues composing Major League Baseball. The game was played on July 7, 1959, at Forbes Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, home of the Pittsburgh Pirates of the NL. The game resulted in a 5–4 victory for the National League. An unprecedented second game was scheduled for later in the season in Los Angeles, California.

1993 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1993 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 64th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 13, 1993, at Oriole Park at Camden Yards in Baltimore, Maryland, the home of the Baltimore Orioles of the American League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 9-3.

This is also the last Major League Baseball All-Star Game to date to be televised by CBS.

Bill McAfee

William Fort McAfee, Jr. (September 7, 1907 – July 8, 1958) was an American baseball pitcher and politician.

He played Major League Baseball from 1930 to 1934 for the Chicago Cubs, Boston Braves, Washington Senators, and St. Louis Browns. He appeared in 83 major league games, all but seven as a relief pitcher, and compiled a record of 10-4 with an ERA of 5.69. He had his best season in 1932 when he was the starting pitcher in five games and compiled a 6-1 record and 3.92 ERA for the Senators.

McAfee also played college baseball for the University of Michigan from 1927 to 1929 and participated in the Michigan Wolverines baseball team's 13-game tour of Japan in the fall of 1929. He also played minor league baseball in the International League for the Reading Keystones, Newark Bears, Montreal Royals, and Rochester Red Wings.

A native of Georgia, McAfee later returned to his home state and served as the mayor of Albany, Georgia. He died in a plane crash near Culpeper, Virginia in 1958.

Rocky Bridges

Everett Lamar "Rocky" Bridges (August 7, 1927 – January 27, 2015) was a middle infielder and third baseman with an 11-year career in American Major League Baseball from 1951 to 1961. Bridges played for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Cincinnati Reds and St. Louis Cardinals of the National League, and the Washington Senators, Detroit Tigers, Cleveland Indians and Los Angeles Angels of the American League. He also appeared occasionally in the outfield.

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