1958 Asian Games

The 1958 Asian Games, officially the Third Asian Games (Japanese: 第3回アジア競技大会) and commonly known as Tokyo 1958, was a multi-sport event held in Tokyo, Japan, from 24 May to 1 June 1958. It was governed by the Asian Games Federation. A total of 1,820 athletes representing 20 Asian National Olympic Committees (NOCs) participated in the Games. The program featured competitions in 13 different sports encompassing 97 events, including four non-Olympic sports, judo, table tennis, tennis and volleyball. Four of these competition sports – field hockey, table tennis, tennis and volleyball – were introduced for the first time in the Asian Games.

This is the first time that Japan hosted the Asian Games.

III Asian Games
3rd asiad
CountryJapan
MottoEver Onward
Nations participating20
Athletes participating1,820
Events112 in 13 sports
Opening ceremonyMay 24
Closing ceremonyJune 1
Officially opened byHirohito
Emperor of Japan
Torch lighterMikio Oda
Manila 1954 Jakarta 1962  >

Background

The Asian Games is a multi-sport event, much like the Summer Olympics (albeit on a much smaller scale), with participation exclusively for Asian countries. The first edition was held in the capital city of India, New Delhi, in 1951, attracting 489 competitors from 11 nations.

Sports

The programme for the Tokyo 1958 Games included 13 different sports divided into 97 events. Four of these sports – judo,[1] table tennis,[2] tennis[3] and volleyball[4] – were not on the official Olympic sports programme at that time. Badminton was added as a demonstration sport, which, from 1962 onwards, became a regular competitive sport in the Asian Games.[5] Judo was another demonstration sport.

Torch relay

The tradition of torch relay, inspired by the Olympic Games, was introduced for the first time in the Asian Games in 1958.[6] The relay officially began from the main venue of the Second Asian Games, Rizal Memorial Coliseum, in Manila, Philippines. In the host nation, Japan, it was relayed from Okinawa to Kyushu Island. Okinawa was under the United States administration at that time. At the opening ceremony, the Games cauldron was ignited by the first Japanese Olympic gold medallist and the first Asian Olympic champion in an individual event, Mikio Oda.[6][7]

Participating nations

1958 Asian Games participating countries
Participating countries

A record total of 1,820 athletes representing 20 member nations of the Asian Games Federation participated in the Games. The number of participating countries was also greatest in comparison to the first two editions of the Games.

The Thai delegation held a meeting on 22 May 1958 in Tokyo, and invitations were sent to the representatives of Malaysia, Burma and Laos. The agenda of the meeting was to discuss the possibility of forming a regional multi-sport event on the lines of Asian Games for the countries of Southeast Asia. This way the Southeast Asian Peninsular Games (SEAP Games), which later became the Southeast Asian Games, were established and the first SEAP Games were held in Bangkok, Thailand, in 1959.[8]

Opening ceremony

The opening ceremony of the Tokyo 1958 Games was organised on 24 May 1958 at the National Olympic Stadium. The ceremony, among other dignitaries and guests, included the Emperor of Japan Hirohito, crown prince Akihito and Shah of Iran Mohammad Reza Pahlavi. Around 70,000 people attended the opening ceremony.[9]

Calendar

In the following calendar for the 1958 Asian Games, each blue box represents an event competition, such as a qualification round, on that day. The yellow boxes represent days during which medal-awarding finals for a sport were held. The numeral indicates the number of event finals for each sport held that day. On the left, the calendar lists each sport with events held during the Games, and at the right, how many gold medals were won in that sport. There is a key at the top of the calendar to aid the reader.

OC Opening ceremony Event competitions 1 Event finals CC Closing ceremony
May / June 1958 24
Sat
25
Sun
26
Mon
27
Tue
28
Wed
29
Thu
30
Fri
31
Sat
1
Sun
Gold
medals
Athletics pictogram.svg Athletics 5 6 6 5 9 31
Basketball pictogram.svg Basketball 1 1
Boxing pictogram.svg Boxing 10 10
Cycling (road) pictogram.svg Cycling – Road 2 2
Cycling (road) pictogram.svg Cycling – Track 1 2 1 4
Diving pictogram.svg Diving 1 1 1 1 4
Field hockey pictogram.svg Field hockey 1 1
Football pictogram.svg Football 1 1
Shooting pictogram.svg Shooting 1 2 1 1 1 6
Swimming pictogram.svg Swimming 6 5 5 5 21
Table tennis pictogram.svg Table tennis 1 1 5 7
Tennis pictogram.svg Tennis 2 3 5
Volleyball (indoor) pictogram.svg Volleyball 2 2
Water polo pictogram.svg Water polo 1 1
Weightlifting pictogram.svg Weightlifting 2 2 2 2 8
Wrestling pictogram.svg Wrestling 8 8
Total gold medals 8 11 18 17 18 12 24 4
Ceremonies OC CC
May / June 1958 24h
Sat
25
Sun
26
Mon
27
Tue
28
Wed
29
Thu
30
Fri
31
Sat
1
Sun
Gold
medals

Medal table

Athletes from 16 countries won medals, leaving four countries without a medal, and 11 of them won at least one gold medal. Afghanistan, Cambodia, Nepal and North Borneo did not win any medal. The Japanese 4 × 100 metres medley relay team of Keiji Hase (backstroke), Masaru Furukawa (breaststroke), Manabu Koga (freestyle) and Takashi Ishimoto (butterfly) won the gold medal with a time of 4:17.2 and broke the world record.[10]

The ranking in this table is consistent with International Olympic Committee convention in its published medal tables. By default, the table is ordered by the number of gold medals the athletes from a nation have won (in this context, a nation is an entity represented by a NOC). The number of silver medals is taken into consideration next, followed by the number of bronze medals. If nations are still tied, equal ranking is given; they are listed alphabetically by IOC country code.

The top ten ranked NOCs at these Games are listed below. The host nation, Japan, is highlighted.

  *   Host nation (Japan)

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Japan (JPN)*674130138
2 Philippines (PHI)8192148
3 South Korea (KOR)871227
4 Iran (IRI)7141132
5 Republic of China (ROC)6111734
6 Pakistan (PAK)611926
7 India (IND)54413
8 South Vietnam (VNM)2046
9 Burma (BIR)1214
10 Singapore (SGP)1113
11–16Remaining121619
Totals (16 nations)112112126350

References

  1. ^ "Judo at the 1964 Tokyo Summer Games – Overview". Sports Reference. Retrieved 4 January 2014.
  2. ^ "Table tennis at the 1988 Seoul Summer Games – Overview". Sports Reference. Retrieved 4 January 2014.
  3. ^ "2 More Olympic Games". The New York Times. October 2, 1981. Retrieved 4 January 2014.
  4. ^ "Volleyball at the 1964 Tokyo Summer Games – Overview". Sports Reference. Retrieved 4 January 2014.
  5. ^ "Badminton – History". Doha-2006.com (via Wayback Machine). Archived from the original on 4 January 2007. Retrieved 4 January 2014.
  6. ^ a b "III Asian Games". Pakistan Sports Board. Retrieved 8 January 2014.
  7. ^ Nakamura, Ken (26 April 2010). "Interview with Mikio Oda, first Japanese Olympic gold medallist". International Association of Athletics Federations. Retrieved 8 January 2014.
  8. ^ Rahman, Mansoor (5 August 1989). "Lofty ideals that shaped SEA Games – Member countries". New Straits Times. Kuala Lumpur. p. 6. Retrieved 3 January 2014.
  9. ^ "Events & Discoveries – Asian Games". Sports Illustrated. 8 (22). 2 June 1958. Retrieved 3 January 2014.
  10. ^ "A worldwide roundup of the sports information of the week". Sports Illustrated. 8 (23). 9 June 1958. Retrieved 3 January 2014.

External links

Preceded by
Manila
Asian Games
Tokyo

III Asiad (1958)
Succeeded by
Jakarta
Athletics at the 1958 Asian Games

Athletics was contested at the 1958 Asian Games in National Stadium, Tokyo, Japan from May 25 to May 29.

Field hockey at the 1958 Asian Games

Field hockey was contested for men only at the 1958 Asian Games in Tokyo, Japan between 25 May and 30 May 1958 with five teams participating in a round robin competition.

Pakistan won the gold medal, India finished second with lower goal difference and South Korea won the bronze medal.

Football at the 1958 Asian Games

Football at the 1958 Asian Games was held in Tokyo, Japan from 24 May to 1 June 1958.

Fujie Eguchi

Fujie Eguchi (江口 冨士枝, Eguchi Fujie; born 18 November 1932 in Nagasaki) is a former female international table tennis player from Japan.

India at the 1958 Asian Games

India participated in the 1958 Asian Games—Third Asian Games, held in the Tokyo, Japan from 24 May to 1 June 1958. Indian athletes achieved total 14 medals with 5 golds and finished at the seventh spot in a medal table.

Iran at the 1958 Asian Games

Iran participated in the 1958 Asian Games held in the capital city of Tokyo, Japan. This country is ranked 4th with 7 gold medals in this edition of the Asiad.

Israel at the 1958 Asian Games

Israel participated in the 1958 Asian Games held in Tokyo, Japan, from 24 May to 1 June 1958. Following the 1958 games, Israel was unable to participate again until the 1966 Asian Games because during the 1962 Asian Games the host country Indonesia, refused to permit the participation of Israel due to political reasons, stating it would cause issues with their relationship with the Arab states.

Japan at the 1958 Asian Games

Japan participated and hosted the 1958 Asian Games held in the capital city of Tokyo.

This country was ranked 1st with 67 gold medals, 41 silver medals and 30 bronze medals with a total of 138 medals

to secure its top spot in the medal tally.

Keisuke Tsunoda

Keisuke Tsunoda is a male former Japanese international table tennis player.

Milkha Singh

Milkha Singh (birthdate, 20th Nov 1929), also known as The Flying Sikh, is an Indian former track and field sprinter who was introduced to the sport while serving in the Indian Army. He was the only Indian athlete to win an individual athletics gold medal at a Commonwealth Games until Krishna Poonia won the discus gold medal at the 2010 Commonwealth Games. He also won gold medals in the 1958 and 1962 Asian Games. He represented India in the 1956 Summer Olympics in Melbourne, the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome and the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo. He was awarded the Padma Shri, India's fourth-highest civilian honour, in recognition of his sporting achievements.

The race for which Singh is best remembered is his fourth-place finish in the 400 metres final at the 1960 Olympic Games, which he had entered as one of the favourites. He led the race till the 200m mark before easing off, allowing others to pass him. Various records were broken in the race, which required a photo-finish and saw American Otis Davis being declared the winner by one-hundredth of a second over German Carl Kaufmann. Singh's fourth-place time of 45.73 became the Indian national record and held for almost 40 years

From beginnings that saw him orphaned and displaced during the Partition of India, Singh has become a sporting icon in his country. In 2008, journalist Rohit Brijnath described Singh as "the finest athlete India has ever produced". In July 2012, The Independent said that "India's most revered Olympian is a gallant loser" and noted the paucity of success at that time — 20 medals — achieved by Indian competitors in the Olympic Games despite the country having a population in excess of one billion.

Moon Jung-sik

Moon Jung-Sik (June 23, 1930 - December 25, 2006) was a South Korean association football player and manager. He was a member of Korean national football team in the 1950s~1960S.

He was former manager of South Korea and first manager of Ulsan Hyundai FC and Oita FC (current Oita Trinita).

Republic of China at the 1958 Asian Games

The Republic of China participated in the 1958 Asian Games held in the Tokyo, Japan from 24 May to 1 June 1958. They ranked 5th with 6 gold medals in this edition of the Asiad.

Seiji Narita

Seiji Narita (Japanese: 成田 静司, Hepburn: Narita Seiji) is a male former international table tennis player from Japan.

Table tennis at the 1958 Asian Games

Table tennis was contested at the 1958 Asian Games in Waseda University Gymnasium, Tokyo, Japan from May 25 to 31 May, 1958.

Table tennis had team, doubles and singles events for men and women, as well as a mixed doubles competition.

Taeko Namba

Taeko Namba is a former international table tennis player from Japan.

Tomi Okawa

Tomi Okawa is a former female international table tennis player from Japan.

Toshiaki Tanaka

Toshiaki Tanaka (田中 利明, Tanaka Toshiaki, 24 February 1935 – 6 February 1998) was a Japanese international table tennis player.

Trần Văn Liễu

Trần Văn Liễu is a male former international table tennis player from Vietnam.

Volleyball at the 1958 Asian Games

Volleyball was contested for men only at the 1958 Asian Games in Komazawa Outdoor Volleyball Court, Tokyo, Japan.

Participating National Olympic Committees
Summer Games
Winter Games
Nations at the 1958 Asian Games in Tokyo, Japan
Events at the 1958 Asian Games (Tokyo)

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