1957–58 NHL season

The 1957–58 NHL season was the 41st season of the National Hockey League. The Montreal Canadiens won the Stanley Cup for the third consecutive season, defeating the Boston Bruins four games to two in the best-of-seven final series.

1957–58 NHL season
LeagueNational Hockey League
SportIce hockey
DurationOctober 8, 1957 – April 20, 1958
Number of games70
Number of teams6
Regular season
Season championMontreal Canadiens
Season MVPGordie Howe (Red Wings)
Top scorerDickie Moore (Canadiens)
Stanley Cup
ChampionsMontreal Canadiens
  Runners-upBoston Bruins

League business

It was announced in September that Senator Hartland Molson had purchased 60% stock from the Canadian Arena Company and the Montreal Canadiens from Senator Donat Raymond.

Organization of Players' Association

Doug Harvey and Ted Lindsay led the drive to form (on February 11, 1957) the National Hockey League Players' Association (NHLPA), a workers' labour association, and sued the NHL over the issue of player pensions, salaries during training camp, meal allowances, remuneration for exhibition games and a no trade clause after six years service.[1] Lindsay lost his captaincy of the Detroit Red Wings and was traded to Chicago, on July 23, 1957, in an effort to intimidate the players.

After the NHL declined to negotiate with the players over benefits and would not open the books on the pension plan, the player's association filed an anti-trust lawsuit on October 10, 1957. The lawsuit alleged the monopolization of the professional hockey industry since 1926, in violation of the Sherman and Clayton Anti-Trust Acts.[2] Furthermore, On November 6, 1957 the Toronto Maple Leafs players voted unanimously to certify the union.

The NHL started to fight back. First, they traded Lindsay to Chicago to separate him from the Red Wings, the American team the NHLPA had targeted for a certification vote. Next, Jack Adams spread false stories in the press alleging various slanders had been made by Lindsay against the Red Wings players, and produced a fake contract to the press showing an over-inflated salary for Lindsay, greater than Hart Trophy MVP, teammate and friend Gordie Howe. The ruse worked and the Red Wings players decided to dis-associate themselves from the NHLPA on November 13, 1957.[3]

Part of the problem of organizing the players was confusion about the type of association they were forming. The NHLPA had applied, in Canada, to the Ontario Labour Relations Board for certification, but the ORLB had no experience with workers like hockey players.[4] NHLPA members negotiated individual contracts and wanted to continue to bargain this way. The matter of the NHLPA being an actual union, where the members were bound together and fought for collective agreements, was unclear. The NHLPA legal counsel, Milton Mound, addressed this, saying that the players would negotiate on matters common to all players (pensions, allowances) but retained the right to individual contracts.[5] The League, and especially Conn Smythe, argued that players were forming a "trade union" and were no better than "commies" and would lose things like individual bonuses.[6] He believed that hockey players were in the business of being "independent contractors" and had no right or reason for a collective organization.[7]

The confusion worried both employer and employee. The situation was exacerbated by the certification process. The OLRB was taking time, and no one knew how this transnational association would work, or how it would be recognized by the US National Labor Relations Board.[8] In fact, the NLRB asked the NHLPA to withdraw its unfair labor practices charge on November 20, 1957, arguing it did not have jurisdiction. This was followed by the Montreal Canadiens players rejection of the association in early January, 1958.[9]

The OLRB resumed meeting on January 7, but both the League and the players were concerned. The NHL was convinced that the ORLB was not going to dismiss the application, regardless of how they ruled on the union versus association issue, and the players were worried (given the setbacks in Detroit and Montreal) that they didn't have grounds to actually form an association (especially since they didn't want to be a traditional "union.")[10]

The players and owners both felt pressure to conclude something, so they gathered, without lawyers, for a 13 hour meeting in the boardroom of the Biltmore Hotel in Palm Beach, just after the regular NHL winter meetings.[11] In an out-of-court settlement on February 5, 1958, the NHL promised:[12]

  • a $7000 minimum wage (which was, in actuality, the unofficial League norm,)
  • an increase in pension benefits,
  • increased hospitalization benefits,
  • a limit on the number of exhibition games,
  • the player shall be the sole judge of his physical fitness to play after injury.

Ross concludes:

In the end, the players had little to show for their rebellion. A few cosmetic changes were made, but even the communication problem did not seem to have been solved. Over the ensuing seasons the Owner-Player Council did not even meet regularly, and paternalism prevailed. It was not until 1967 that the idea of a union once again gained currency, again in an era of general revived interest across all the major league sports. The fundamental question at the root of the NHLPA failure was whether players really were laborers who could form a trade union. Seemingly caught in a space both commercial and non-commercial, players felt uneasy locating themselves wholly within either. This in itself reflected the success of the owners in using cultural formations to restrain their labor force. Led by Conn Smythe, the league appealed to cultural bonds of loyalty and tradition as justifications for retaining the existing economic structure of labor-management relations, long after other industries had been forced by the state to move toward formal, union-led collective bargaining arrangements.[13]

Regular season

This season saw the Montreal Canadiens regain first place overall, while the previous season's leader, the Detroit Red Wings, slipped to third. Montreal's Maurice "Rocket" Richard became the first NHL player to score 500 career goals, Jacques Plante won his third straight Vezina Trophy, and Doug Harvey his fourth straight Norris Trophy.

Glenn Hall, after two playoff years in which the Wings were eliminated, was traded, along with Ted Lindsay to the Chicago Black Hawks and Terry Sawchuk was brought back to Detroit in a deal that saw Larry Hillman and Johnny Bucyk go to Boston. Chicago almost made the playoffs, and Hall's goaltending, including seven shutouts, one of which was in his debut with the Hawks, made him a contender for the Hart Trophy.

On October 19, 1957, Rocket Richard, in a 3–1 win over Chicago, scored his 500th career goal, against Glenn Hall. He immediately dedicated it to his old coach Dick Irvin, who had died on May 15, 1957, after a long bout with bone cancer.

When Marcel Paille was brought up to the Rangers from Providence of the AHL for the ailing Gump Worsley, he sparkled, and Worsley was sent down to Providence, though he was eventually recalled. Worsley had his finest campaign up to this point, with a 2.32 goals-against average and four shutouts, and the Rangers finished second — their highest finish since 1941–42.

Two contenders for the Calder Memorial Trophy, Chicago's Bobby Hull and the Toronto Maple Leafs' Frank Mahovlich, battled all season for rookie honours. Mahovlich prevailed, although the Maple Leafs finished last in the NHL.

This season also saw the first player of African descent play in the league. Willie O'Ree suited up with the Boston Bruins on January 18, 1958, in a game against the Canadiens in Montreal.

Final standings

National Hockey League[14]
GP W L T GF GA DIFF Pts
1 Montreal Canadiens 70 43 17 10 250 158 +92 96
2 New York Rangers 70 32 25 13 195 188 +7 77
3 Detroit Red Wings 70 29 29 12 176 207 −31 70
4 Boston Bruins 70 27 28 15 199 194 +5 69
5 Chicago Black Hawks 70 24 39 7 163 202 −39 55
6 Toronto Maple Leafs 70 21 38 11 192 226 −34 53

Playoffs

The first-place Montreal Canadiens swept the third-place Detroit Red Wings to qualify for the Finals. In the other semifinal, the fourth-place Boston Bruins upset the second-seeded New York Rangers in six games to reach the Finals.

Playoff bracket

Semifinals Stanley Cup Finals
      
1 Montreal 4
3 Detroit 0
1 Montreal 4
4 Boston 2
2 New York 2
4 Boston 4

Semifinals

(1) Montreal Canadiens vs. (3) Detroit Red Wings

Montreal won series 4–0

(2) New York Rangers vs. (4) Boston Bruins

Boston won series 4–2

Stanley Cup Finals

The Canadiens made their eighth consecutive appearance in the Stanley Cup Finals and defeated the Bruins in six games. It was the Canadiens' third consecutive Stanley Cup triumph.

Montreal won series 4–2

Awards

Award winners
Prince of Wales Trophy:
(Regular season champion)
Montreal Canadiens
Art Ross Trophy:
(Top scorer)
Dickie Moore, Montreal Canadiens
Calder Memorial Trophy:
(Best first-year player)
Frank Mahovlich, Toronto Maple Leafs
Hart Trophy:
(Most valuable player)
Gordie Howe, Detroit Red Wings
James Norris Memorial Trophy:
(Best defenceman)
Doug Harvey, Montreal Canadiens
Lady Byng Memorial Trophy:
(Excellence and sportsmanship)
Camille Henry, New York Rangers
Vezina Trophy:
(Goaltender of team with the best goals-against average)
Jacques Plante, Montreal Canadiens

All-Star teams

First team   Position   Second team
Glenn Hall, Chicago Black Hawks G Jacques Plante, Montreal Canadiens
Doug Harvey, Montreal Canadiens D Fern Flaman, Boston Bruins
Bill Gadsby, New York Rangers D Marcel Pronovost, Detroit Red Wings
Henri Richard, Montreal Canadiens C Jean Beliveau, Montreal Canadiens
Gordie Howe, Detroit Red Wings RW Andy Bathgate, New York Rangers
Dickie Moore, Montreal Canadiens LW Camille Henry, New York Rangers

Player statistics

Scoring leaders

Note: GP = Games played, G = Goals, A = Assists, PTS = Points, PIM = Penalties in minutes

Player Team GP G A Pts PIM
Dickie Moore Montreal Canadiens 70 36 48 84 65
Henri Richard Montreal Canadiens 67 28 52 80 56
Andy Bathgate New York Rangers 65 30 48 78 42
Gordie Howe Detroit Red Wings 64 33 44 77 40
Bronco Horvath Boston Bruins 67 30 36 66 71
Ed Litzenberger Chicago Black Hawks 70 32 30 62 63
Fleming Mackell Boston Bruins 70 20 40 60 72
Jean Beliveau Montreal Canadiens 55 27 32 59 93
Alex Delvecchio Detroit Red Wings 70 21 38 59 22
Don McKenney Boston Bruins 70 28 30 58 22

[15]

Leading goaltenders

Note: GP = Games played; Min – Minutes Played; GA = Goals Against; GAA = Goals Against Average; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; SO = Shutouts

Player Team GP MIN GA GAA W L T SO
Jacques Plante Montreal Canadiens 57 3386 119 2.11 34 14 8 9
Lorne Worsley New York Rangers 37 2220 86 2.32 21 10 6 4
Don Simmons Boston Bruins 39 2288 92 2.41 15 14 9 5
Harry Lumley Boston Bruins 24 1500 71 2.84 11 10 3 3
Glenn Hall Chicago Black Hawks 70 4200 200 2.86 24 39 7 7
Terry Sawchuk Detroit Red Wings 70 4200 205 2.94 29 29 12 3
Marcel Paille New York Rangers 33 1980 102 3.09 11 15 7 1
Ed Chadwick Toronto Maple Leafs 70 4200 223 3.19 21 38 11 4

Coaches

Debuts

The following is a list of players of note who played their first NHL game in 1957–58 (listed with their first team, asterisk(*) marks debut in playoffs):

Last games

The following is a list of players of note who played their last game in the NHL in 1957–58 (listed with their last team):

See also

References

  • Coleman, Charles L. (1976), Trail of the Stanley Cup, Vol III, Sherbrooke, QC: Progressive Publications
  • Cruise, David (1991). Net Worth: Exploding the Myths of Pro Hockey.
  • Diamond, Dan, ed. (1994). Years of glory, 1942–1967: the National Hockey League's official book of the six-team era. Toronto, ON: McClelland and Stewart. ISBN 0-7710-2817-2.
  • Diamond, Dan, ed. (2000). Total Hockey. Kingston, NY: Total Sports. ISBN 1-892129-85-X.
  • Dinger, Ralph, ed. (2011). The National Hockey League Official Guide & Record Book 2012. Toronto, ON: Dan Diamond & Associates. ISBN 978-1-894801-22-5.
  • Dryden, Steve, ed. (2000). Century of hockey. Toronto, ON: McClelland & Stewart Ltd. ISBN 0-7710-4179-9.
  • Duplacey, James (2008), Hockey’s Book of Firsts, North Dighton, MA: JG Press, ISBN 978-1-57215-037-9
  • Fischler, Stan; Fischler, Shirley; Hughes, Morgan; Romain, Joseph; Duplacey, James (2003). The Hockey Chronicle: Year-by-Year History of the National Hockey League. Lincolnwood, IL: Publications International Inc. ISBN 0-7853-9624-1.
  • McFarlane, Brian (1969), 50 Years Of Hockey, Winnipeg, MAN: Greywood Publishing, ASIN B000GW45S0
  • McFarlane, Brian (1973). The Story of the National Hockey League. New York, NY: Pagurian Press. ISBN 0-684-13424-1.
Notes
  1. ^ Ross, J. Andrew, Trust and Antitrust: The Failure of the First National Hockey League Players’ Association, 1957–1958 (The Journal of) Business and Economic History On-line, Vol.8, 2010, pp.4-5
  2. ^ Ross, J. Andrew, Trust and Antitrust: The Failure of the First National Hockey League Players’ Association, 1957–1958 (The Journal of) Business and Economic History On-line, Vol.8, 2010, p.7
  3. ^ Cruise, pp. 78–112.
  4. ^ Ross, J. Andrew, Trust and Antitrust: The Failure of the First National Hockey League Players’ Association, 1957–1958 (The Journal of) Business and Economic History On-line, Vol.8, 2010, p.8
  5. ^ Ross, J. Andrew, Trust and Antitrust: The Failure of the First National Hockey League Players’ Association, 1957–1958 (The Journal of) Business and Economic History On-line, Vol.8, 2010, p.9
  6. ^ Ross, J. Andrew, Trust and Antitrust: The Failure of the First National Hockey League Players’ Association, 1957–1958 (The Journal of) Business and Economic History On-line, Vol.8, 2010, p.5 & 8
  7. ^ Ross, J. Andrew, Trust and Antitrust: The Failure of the First National Hockey League Players’ Association, 1957–1958 (The Journal of) Business and Economic History On-line, Vol.8, 2010, p.10
  8. ^ Ross, J. Andrew, Trust and Antitrust: The Failure of the First National Hockey League Players’ Association, 1957–1958 (The Journal of) Business and Economic History On-line, Vol.8, 2010, p.6
  9. ^ Ross, J. Andrew, Trust and Antitrust: The Failure of the First National Hockey League Players’ Association, 1957–1958 (The Journal of) Business and Economic History On-line, Vol.8, 2010, pp,10-11
  10. ^ Ross, J. Andrew, Trust and Antitrust: The Failure of the First National Hockey League Players’ Association, 1957–1958 (The Journal of) Business and Economic History On-line, Vol.8, 2010, p.11
  11. ^ Ross, J. Andrew, Trust and Antitrust: The Failure of the First National Hockey League Players’ Association, 1957–1958 (The Journal of) Business and Economic History On-line, Vol.8, 2010, p.12
  12. ^ Coleman, pp. 334–335.
  13. ^ Ross, J. Andrew, Trust and Antitrust: The Failure of the First National Hockey League Players’ Association, 1957–1958 (The Journal of) Business and Economic History On-line, Vol.8, 2010, pp,13-14
  14. ^ "1957–1958 Division Standings Standings - NHL.com - Standings". National Hockey League.
  15. ^ Dinger 2011, p. 149.

External links

11th National Hockey League All-Star Game

The 11th National Hockey League All-Star Game took place at the Montreal Forum, home of the Montreal Canadiens, on October 5, 1957. The Canadiens, winner of the 1957 Stanley Cup Finals, played a team of All-Stars for the second consecutive year, with the All-Stars winning by a 5–3 score.

1957–58 Boston Bruins season

The 1957–58 Boston Bruins season saw the Bruins finish in fourth place in the National Hockey League (NHL) with a record of 27 wins, 28 losses, and 15 ties for 69 points. They defeated the New York Rangers in six games in the Semi-finals before losing the Stanley Cup Finals, also in six games, to the Montreal Canadiens.

1957–58 Chicago Black Hawks season

The 1957–58 Chicago Black Hawks season was the team's 32nd season in the NHL, and the club was coming off their fourth consecutive last place finish in the league in 1956–57, as they had a 16–39–15 record, earning 47 points. The struggling Black Hawks had finished in last nine times in the past eleven seasons, and only one playoff appearance since 1946.

During the off-season, the Black Hawks and Detroit Red Wings made a blockbuster trade, as Chicago traded Hank Bassen, Johnny Wilson, Bill Preston, and Forbes Kennedy to the Red Wings for Glenn Hall and Ted Lindsay. Hall had won the Calder Memorial Trophy in 1956, while Lindsay was a key member of the Red Wings Stanley Cup championships in 1950, 1952, 1954, and 1955. Chicago also signed 18-year-old Bobby Hull, who had spent the past two seasons with the St. Catharines Teepees of the OHA.

Chicago got off to a good start, playing over .500 hockey thirteen games into the season, as they had a 6–5–3 record, however, the club fell into a slump, going 4–12–3 in their next 19 games, falling out of the playoff race. Tommy Ivan decided to step down from head coaching duties, as he hired former Teepees head coach Rudy Pilous to take over the team. The Hawks responded, playing .500 hockey in Pilous' first 18 games behind the bench to get back into the playoff race, however, a seven-game losing streak soon followed, and the team fell out of playoff contention for good. The Hawks finished the year 24–39–7, earning 55 points, their highest total since 1952–53, and did not finish in last place for the first time since 1953, as they had two more points than the Toronto Maple Leafs.

Offensively, Chicago was led by Ed Litzenberger, who led the club in goals with 32, while adding 30 assists for 62 points. Rookie Bobby Hull scored 13 goals and 47 points, as he finishing second to Frank Mahovlich of the Toronto Maple Leafs for the Calder Memorial Trophy. Ted Lindsay recorded 15 goals and 39 points in his first season with the team, which was a 46-point dropoff from the previous season. Lindsay also had a club high 110 penalty minutes. Pierre Pilote led the defense, scoring 6 goals and 30 points, while fellow blueliner Moose Vasko scored 6 goals and 26 points.

In goal, Glenn Hall had all the playing time, winning 24 games, while posting a 2.86 GAA, and earning 7 shutouts.

1957–58 Detroit Red Wings season

The 1957–58 Detroit Red Wings season was the Red Wings' 32nd season. The season involved sending Ted Lindsay and Glenn Hall to the Chicago Black Hawks.

1957–58 Montreal Canadiens season

The 1957–58 Montreal Canadiens season was the club's 49th season of play. The Canadiens won their third-straight Stanley Cup and the tenth in club history.

1957–58 New York Rangers season

The 1957–58 New York Rangers season was the 32nd season for the team in the National Hockey League (NHL). The Rangers finished the regular season with 77 points, a total that placed them second in the NHL. New York qualified for the Stanley Cup playoffs, but lost to the Boston Bruins in the semi-finals.

1957–58 Toronto Maple Leafs season

The 1957–58 Toronto Maple Leafs season was Toronto's 41st season in the National Hockey League (NHL).

1958 Stanley Cup Finals

The 1958 Stanley Cup Finals was contested by the two-time defending champion Montreal Canadiens and the Boston Bruins in a rematch of the 1957 Final. The Canadiens, who were appearing in the Finals for the eighth consecutive year, would win the series 4–2, for their third straight Cup victory, and tenth in the team's history.

Black players in ice hockey

The history of black players in North American ice hockey has roots dating back to the late 19th century. The first black ice hockey star was Herb Carnegie during the Great Depression. Willie O'Ree broke the NHL's black color barrier with the Boston Bruins.

Frank Fredrickson

Sigurður Franklin Fredrickson (June 3, 1895 – May 28, 1979) was a Canadian ice hockey player who was significant to both the amateur and professional sport as it evolved in North America in the early 20th century. Fredrickson's career was interrupted by military service during World War I and prematurely ended by a knee injury in 1931.The Icelandic spelling of his last name is Friðriksson and the alternate English spelling Frederickson.

Gerry James

Gerald Edwin James (born October 22, 1934) is a former professional Canadian football running back and professional ice hockey player. He played for the Winnipeg Blue Bombers of the Canadian Football League (CFL) and the Toronto Maple Leafs of the National Hockey League (NHL). His is a member of the Canadian Football Hall of Fame, like his father, Eddie James, who also played for the Blue Bombers. James was born in Regina, Saskatchewan.

In a period overlapping the 1959 CFL season and 1959–60 NHL season, James became the only player to play in the CFL's Grey Cup (November 28, 1959—won cup) and the NHL's Stanley Cup (first game April 9, 1960—lost cup) in the same season.

Harry Pidhirny

Harry Pidhirny (March 5, 1928 – December 20, 2010) was a Canadian professional ice hockey player. Pidhirny played only two games during the 1957–58 NHL season for the Boston Bruins, but was a top scorer in the minors, and juniors. In addition to the Bruins, Pidhirny also played for the Springfield Indians, Syracuse Warriors, San Francisco Seals, Providence Reds, Baltimore Clippers, and Muskegon Mohawks. He died in 2010.

Jacques Plante

Joseph Jacques Omer Plante (French pronunciation: ​[ʒɑk plɑ̃t]; January 17, 1929 – February 27, 1986) was a Canadian professional ice hockey goaltender. During a career lasting from 1947 to 1975, he was considered to be one of the most important innovators in hockey. He played for the Montreal Canadiens from 1953 to 1963; during his tenure, the team won the Stanley Cup six times, including five consecutive wins. In 2017 Plante was named one of the '100 Greatest NHL Players' in history.Plante retired in 1965 but was persuaded to return to the National Hockey League to play for the expansion St. Louis Blues in 1968. He was later traded to the Toronto Maple Leafs in 1970 and to the Boston Bruins in 1973. He joined the World Hockey Association as coach and general manager for the Quebec Nordiques in 1973–74. He then played goal for the Edmonton Oilers in 1974–75, ending his professional career with that team.

Plante was the first NHL goaltender to wear a goaltender mask in regulation play on a regular basis. He developed and tested many versions of the mask (including the forerunner of today's mask/helmet combination) with the assistance of other experts. Plante was the first NHL goaltender to regularly play the puck outside his crease in support of his team's defencemen, and he often instructed his teammates from behind the play. Plante was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1978, was chosen as the goaltender of the Canadiens' "dream team" in 1985, and was inducted into the Quebec Sports Pantheon in 1994. The Montreal Canadiens retired Plante's jersey, #1, the following year. Plante ranks seventh among NHL goalies for all-time career wins with 437.

List of NHL players with 500 goals

For ice hockey players in the National Hockey League (NHL), scoring 500 regular season goals is considered a highly significant achievement.

As of the completion of the 2018–19 NHL season—the 101th regular season of play of the National Hockey League—a total of 45 players have scored at least 500 regular season goals in their NHL career.

A 500-goal career was first achieved in 1957–58, the 41st season of the NHL, when Maurice Richard scored his 500th goal in his 863rd game played. The most recent player to score 500 goals is Patrick Marleau who achieved it on February 2, 2017.

March 25 Detroit Red Wings 1–8 Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
No scoring First period 02:22 – Maurice Richard (1)
04:07 – pp – Maurice Richard (2)
06:20 – Jean Beliveau (1)
08:55 – ppBernie Geoffrion (1)
14:23 – Phil Goyette (1)
Johnny Wilson (1) – pp – 12:19 Second period 03:59 – Phil Goyette (2)
No scoring Third period 12:17 – ppDickie Moore (1)
17:56 – Phil Goyette (3)
Terry Sawchuck Goalie stats Jacques Plante
March 27 Detroit Red Wings 1–5 Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
No scoring First period 18:04 – Phil Goyette (4)
Johnny Wilson (2) – 13:39 Second period 17:13 – Jean Beliveau (2)
No scoring Third period 05:05 – ppMaurice Richard (3)
05:18 – Andre Pronovost (1)
12:23 – Maurice Richard (4)
Terry Sawchuck Goalie stats Jacques Plante
March 30 Montreal Canadiens 2–1 OT Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
Dickie Moore (2) – pp – 16:00 Second period 14:07 – Forbes Kennedy (1)
No scoring Third period No scoring
Andre Pronovost (2) – 11:52 First overtime period No scoring
Jacques Plante Goalie stats Terry Sawchuck
April 1 Montreal Canadiens 4–3 Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
Maurice Richard (5) – 08:45 Second period 05:49 – Jack McIntyre (1)
10:27 – Gordie Howe (1)
11:13 – Billy McNeill (1)
Maurice Richard (6) – pp – 04:00
Dickie Moore (3) – pp – 09:07
Maurice Richard (7) – 09:56
Third period No scoring
Jacques Plante Goalie stats Terry Sawchuck
March 25 Boston Bruins 3–5 New York Rangers Madison Square Garden III Recap  
Fleming MacKell (1) – 00:58
Jerry Toppazzini (1) – 07:21
First period 04:40 – Larry Popein (1)
10:45 – shAndy Hebenton (1)
18:38 – ppCamille Henry (1)
Bronco Horvath (1) – 17:45 Second period 10:29 – ppDave Creighton (1)
No scoring Third period 17:01 – Dave Creighton (2)
Harry Lumley Goalie stats Gump Worsley
March 27 Boston Bruins 4–3 OT New York Rangers Madison Square Garden III Recap  
Doug Mohns (1) – pp – 05:05
Don McKenney (1) – 19:38
First period 05:28 – Andy Bathgate (1)
08:58 – pp – Andy Bathgate (2)
No scoring Second period 07:24 – Jean-Guy Gendron (1)
Don McKenney (2) – 11:13 Third period No scoring
Jerry Toppazzini (2) – 04:46 First overtime period No scoring
Don Simmons Goalie stats Gump Worsley
March 29 New York Rangers 0–5 Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
No scoring First period 09:24 – ppDoug Mohns (2)
13:18 – ppDon McKenney (3)
17:40 – pp – Don McKenney (4)
No scoring Second period 04:01 – Buddy Boone (1)
No scoring Third period 07:36 – shNorm Johnson (1)
Gump Worsley Goalie stats Don Simmons
April 1 New York Rangers 5–2 Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
Dean Prentice (1) – sh – 05:19
Dave Creighton (3) – pp – 09:47
First period No scoring
Andy Hebenton (2) – 10:17
Andy Bathgate (3) – sh – 15:12
Second period 02:04 – ppJerry Toppazzini (3)
Andy Bathgate (4) – 19:41 Third period 11:32 – sh – Jerry Toppazzini (4)
Gump Worsley Goalie stats Don Simmons
April 3 New York Rangers 1–6 Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
No scoring First period 06:43 – Fleming MacKell (2)
09:11 – ppBronco Horvath (2)
11:24 – Don McKenney (5)
Parker MacDonald (1) – 12:44 Second period 05:10 – shFern Flaman (1)
10:20 – Fern Flaman (2)
No scoring Third period 16:32 – ppJerry Toppazzini (5)
Gump Worsley Goalie stats Don Simmons
April 5 New York Rangers 2–8 Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
Harry Howell (1) – 14:33 First period 00:58 – ppLarry Regan (1)
07:27 – shJerry Toppazzini (6)
11:04 – ppNorm Johnson (2)
17:20 – Fleming MacKell (3)
Andy Bathgate (5) – pp – 04:55 Second period 13:29 – Doug Mohns (3)
No scoring Third period 08:29 – Fleming MacKell (4)
08:58 – Jerry Toppazzini (7)
17:49 – Jerry Toppazzini (8)
Gump Worsley Goalie stats Don Simmons
April 8 Boston Bruins 1–2 Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
No scoring First period 12:24 – ppBernie Geoffrion (2)
Allan Stanley (1) – pp – 05:54 Second period 13:52 – ppDickie Moore (4)
No scoring Third period No scoring
Don Simmons Goalie stats Jacques Plante
April 10 Boston Bruins 5–2 Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
Norm Johnson (3) – 00:20
Don McKenney (6) – pp – 06:58
Bronco Horvath (3) – pp – 17:23
First period 03:12 – ppBernie Geoffrion (3)
Larry Regan (2) – 05:00 Second period 07:00 – Doug Harvey (1)
Bronco Horvath (4) – 16:52 Third period No scoring
Don Simmons Goalie stats Jacques Plante
April 13 Montreal Canadiens 3–0 Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
Maurice Richard (8) – 18:20 First period No scoring
No scoring Second period No scoring
Henri Richard (1) – 03:00
Maurice Richard (9) – 15:06
Third period No scoring
Jacques Plante Goalie stats Don Simmons
April 15 Montreal Canadiens 1–3 Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
No scoring First period 05:35 – ppDon McKenney (7)
No scoring Second period 03:30 – Don McKenney (8)
Claude Provost (1) Third period 02:30 – Jerry Toppazzini (9)
Jacques Plante Goalie stats Don Simmons
April 17 Boston Bruins 2–3 OT Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
Fleming MacKell (5) – pp – 18:43 First period No scoring
No scoring Second period 02:20 – Bernie Geoffrion (4)
03:02 – Jean Beliveau (3)
Bronco Horvath (5) – 10:35 Third period No scoring
No scoring First overtime period 05:45 – Maurice Richard (10)
Don Simmons Goalie stats Jacques Plante
April 20 Montreal Canadiens 5–3 Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
Bernie Geoffrion (5) – 00:46
Maurice Richard (11) – 01:54
First period 18:35 – Don McKenney (9)
Jean Beliveau (4) – 06:42
Bernie Geoffrion (6) – 19:26
Second period No scoring
Doug Harvey (2) – 19:00 Third period 05:20 – Norm Johnson
13:41 – Larry Regan (3)
Jacques Plante Goalie stats Don Simmons
1957–58 NHL season
Teams
See also
1910s
1920s
1930s
1940s
1950s
1960s
1970s
1980s
1990s
2000s
2010s

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