1956 College Football All-America Team

The 1956 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1956. The seven selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1956 season are (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (4) the International News Service (INS), (5) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (6) the Sporting News (SN), and (8) the United Press (UP).

Consensus All-Americans

For the year 1956, the NCAA recognizes seven published All-American teams as "official" designations for purposes of its consensus determinations. The following chart identifies the NCAA-recognized consensus All-Americans and displays which first-team designations they received.

Name Position School Number Official Other
Ron Kramer End Michigan 7/7 AFCA, AP, FWAA, INS, NEA, SN, UP CP, WC
Joe Walton End Pittsburgh 7/7 AFCA, AP, FWAA, INS, NEA, SN, UP CP, WC
Jim Parker Guard Ohio State 7/7 AFCA, AP, FWAA, INS, NEA, SN, UP CP, WC
Bill Glass Guard Baylor 7/7 AFCA, AP, FWAA, INS, NEA, SN, UP WC
Jerry Tubbs Center Oklahoma 7/7 AFCA, AP, FWAA, INS, NEA, SN, UP CP, WC
Jim Brown Back Syracuse 7/7 AFCA, AP, FWAA, INS, NEA, SN, UP CP, WC
Johnny Majors Back Tennessee 7/7 AFCA, AP, FWAA, INS, NEA, SN, UP WC
John Witte Tackle Oregon State 6/7 AFCA, AP, FWAA, INS, NEA, UP CP, WC
Tommy McDonald Back Oklahoma 6/7 AFCA, AP, FWAA, INS, SN, UP CP, WC
John Brodie Quarterback Stanford 4/7 AFCA, FWAA, INS, NEA WC
Lou Michaels Tackle Kentucky 3/7 AFCA, NEA, UP WC

All-American selections for 1956

Ends

  • Ron Kramer, Michigan (College Football Hall of Fame) (AFCA; AP-1; UP-1; SN; INS-1; CP-1; NEA-1; WC; FWAA)
  • Joe Walton, Pittsburgh (AFCA; AP-1; UP-1; SN; CO-1; INS-1; CP-1; NEA-1; WC; FWAA)
  • Buddy Cruze, Tennessee (AP-3; UP-2; INS-2; CP-2; NEA-2;FWAA)
  • Bill Steiger, Washington State (AP-2, FWAA)
  • Walter Brodie,[1] William & Mary (AP-2)
  • Lamar Lundy, Purdue (UP-2; INS-2; NEA-3)
  • Tom Maentz, Michigan (UP-3; CP-3; NEA-3)
  • Paul Lopata, Yale (AP-3)
  • Frank Gilliam, Iowa (UP-3; NEA-2)
  • Jack Johnson, Miami (CP-2)
  • Brad Bomba, Indiana (CP-3)
  • Ernie Pitts, Denver (INS-2)
  • John Bell, Oklahoma (INS-2)

Tackles

  • John Witte, Oregon State (AFCA, AP-1; FWAA UP-1; CO-1; INS-1; CP-1; NEA-1; WC)
  • Lou Michaels, Kentucky (College Football Hall of Fame) (AP-2; UP-1; CO-1; INS-2; CP-2; NEA-1; WC-1)
  • Alex Karras, Iowa (AP-1; UP-2; INS-2; CP-1; NEA-2; FWAA)
  • Charlie Krueger, Texas A&M (AP-3, INS-1, CP-3)
  • Norm Hamilton, TCU (CP-3; NEA-2; FWAA)
  • Bob Hobert, Minnesota (AP-3; UP-3; NEA-3; FWAA)
  • Paul Wiggin, Stanford (UP-2, SN, INS-2)
  • Ed Gray, Oklahoma (SN)
  • Mike Sandusky, Maryland (CP-2)
  • Esker Harris, UCLA (AP-2)

Guards

  • Jim Parker, Ohio State (College and Pro Football Hall of Fame) (AFCA, AP-1; UP-1; SN; INS-1; CP-1; NEA-1; WC; FWAA)
  • Bill Glass, Baylor (College Football Hall of Fame) (AFCA, AP-1; UP-1; SN; CO-1; INS-1; CP-2; NEA-1; WC-1; FWAA)
  • Sam Valentine, Penn State (AP-2; UP-2; INS-2; CP-1; NEA-2; NEA-2; FWAA)
  • John Barrow, Florida (Canadian Football Hall of Fame)(AP-3 CP-3; NEA-3; FWAA)
  • Allen Ecker, Georgia Tech (UP-2; INS-2; CP-3)
  • Dick Day, Washington (AP-3)
  • Stan Slater, Army (UP-3)
  • Bill Krisher, Oklahoma (UP-3)
  • John Owselchik, Yale (CP-2; NEA-3)
  • Dan Currie, Michigan State (INS-2)

Centers

  • Jerry Tubbs, Oklahoma (College Football Hall of Fame) (AFCA, AP-1; UP-1; INS-1; CP-1; NEA-1; WC; FWAA)
  • Don Stephenson, Georgia Tech (AP-2; UP-3; SN; NEA-3; FWAA)
  • John Matsko, Michigan State (AP-3; UP-2; INS-2; CP-3; NEA-2)
  • Don Suchy, Iowa (INS-2; CP-2)
  • Jim Matheny, UCLA (INS-2)

Quarterbacks

  • John Brodie, Stanford (College Football Hall of Fame) (AFCA, AP-3; UP-2; CO-1; INS-1; CP-2; NEA-1; WC-1; FWAA-1)
  • Paul Hornung, Notre Dame (Heisman Trophy winner and College and Pro Football Hall of Fame) (AP-2; UP-1; INS-2; CP-1; NEA-2; FWAA-1)
  • Claude Benham, Columbia (INS-2; NEA-3)
  • Len Dawson, Purdue (UP-3)
  • Gene Newton, Tulane (CP-3)

Backs

  • Jim Brown, Syracuse (College and Pro Football Hall of Fame) (AFCA; AP-1; UP-1; CO-1; INS-1; CP-1; NEA-1; WC; FWAA)
  • Johnny Majors, Tennessee (College Football Hall of Fame) (AFCA; AP-1; UP-1; CO-1; INS-1; CP-2; NEA-1; WC; FWAA)
  • Tommy McDonald, Oklahoma (College and Pro Football Hall of Fame) (AFCA; AP-1; UP-1; CO-1; INS-1; CP-1; NEA-2; WC; FWAA)
  • Jack Pardee, Texas A&M (College Football Hall of Fame) (UP-3; INS-2; CP-1; NEA-2; FWAA)
  • Jim Crawford, Wyoming (AP-3; UP-3; INS-2; CP-2; NEA-1; FWAA)
  • Don Bosseler, Miami (AP-1; INS-2; CP-2; NEA-3)
  • Billy Ray Barnes, Wake Forest (AP-2; FWAA)
  • John David Crow, Texas A&M (AP-2; SN; INS-2; NEA-3)
  • Clendon Thomas, Oklahoma (UP-2; INS-2; CP-3)
  • Ken Ploen, Iowa (AP-2)
  • Jim Swink, TCU (AP-3; UP-2; INS-2)
  • Paige Cothren, Mississippi (UP-2)
  • Mel Dillard, Purdue (AP-3)
  • Jon Arnett, Southern California (UP-3; INS-2; NEA-2)
  • Bob McKeiver, Northwestern (CP-3)
  • John Bayuk, Colorado (INS-2; CP-3)
  • Joel Wells, Clemson (NEA-3)
  • Paul Rotenberry, Georgia Tech (INS-2)
  • Dennis McGill, Yale (INS-2)
  • Earnel Durden, Oregon State (INS-2)

See also

References

  1. ^ Jack D. Daniel (Jan 9, 2012). "Daniel remembers Brodie". The Hopewell News. Archived from the original on 2015-02-13. Retrieved 2015-02-13.
  2. ^ "Football Award Winners" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). 2016. p. 9. Retrieved October 21, 2017.
  3. ^ "Tubbs Tops With Colliers". Ada Evening News. 1956-11-20.
  4. ^ "Jim Brown Is Named On Collier's Team". The Bridgeport Post. 1956-11-20.
  5. ^ "McDonald Lone All American Hold Over". Fergus Falls Daily Journal. Minnesota. 1956-12-07.
  6. ^ http://www.sportswriters.net/fwaa/awards/allamerica/alltime.pdf
  7. ^ "Two Big 10 Players On All-America Team". The Cedar Rapids Gazette. 1956-11-27.
  8. ^ Harry Grayson (1956-11-23). "Grayson Says World's Top Athletes Comprise His 1956 All-America Team: Michigan End Ron Kramer Is Squad's Lone Repeater". The Berkshire Eagle.
  9. ^ Seibel, Paul (December 15, 1956). "Sports Talk". The Evening Times. p. 8. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  10. ^ Norman Miller (1956-11-29). "Tubbs, Parker, Kramer Steal All-America Show: Three Linmen Get Most Attention In United Press' Poll". The Daily News. Huntingdon and Mount Union, PA.
  11. ^ Walter L. Johns (1956-12-01). "Two Repeat On Central Press Captain's All American". The Morning Herald, Hagerstown, MD.
  12. ^ "Walter Camp Football Foundation All-American Selections". Walter Camp Football Foundation. Archived from the original on 2007-12-18.
1956 All-Atlantic Coast Conference football team

The 1956 All-Atlantic Coast Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various selectors for their All-Atlantic Coast Conference ("ACC") teams for the 1956 college football season. Selectors in 1956 included the Associated Press (AP).

1956 All-Big Seven Conference football team

The 1956 All-Big Seven Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Seven Conference teams for the 1956 NCAA University Division football season. The selectors for the 1956 season included the Associated Press (AP) and the United Press (UP). Players selected as first-team players by both the AP and UP are designated in bold.

1956 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1956 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations to the All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1956 Big Ten Conference football season.

1956 All-Pacific Coast football team

The 1956 All-Pacific Coast Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific Coast teams for the 1956 college football season.

1956 All-SEC football team

The 1956 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by various selectors for the 1956 college football season. Tennessee won the conference.

1956 All-Southwest Conference football team

The 1956 All-Southwest Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Southwest Conference teams for the 1956 college football season. The selectors for the 1956 season included the United Press (UP).

1956 Army Cadets football team

The 1956 Army Cadets football team represented the United States Military Academy in the 1956 NCAA University Division football season. In their 16th year under head coach Earl Blaik, the Cadets compiled a 5–3–1 record and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 223 to 153. In the annual Army–Navy Game, the Cadets tied the Midshipmen by a 7 to 7 score. The Cadets also lost to Michigan, Syracuse, and Pittsburgh.Army guard Stan Slater was honored by the United Press as a third-team player on the 1956 College Football All-America Team.

1956 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1956 Big Ten Conference football season was the 61st season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1956 NCAA University Division football season.

The 1956 Iowa Hawkeyes football team, under head coach Forest Evashevski, won the Big Ten championship, compiled a 9–1 record, led the Big Ten in scoring defense (8.4 points allowed per game), was ranked No. 3 in the final AP Poll and in the Coaches Poll, and defeated Oregon State, 35–19, in the 1957 Rose Bowl. Quarterback Ken Ploen received the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the most valuable player in the Big Ten and was also named the most valuable player in the Rose Bowl.

The 1956 Michigan Wolverines football team, under head coach Bennie Oosterbaan, compiled a 7–2 record, handed Iowa its only defeat, and was ranked No. 7 in the final AP Poll and the Coaches Poll. End Ron Kramer was a consensus first-team All-American and was the first Big Ten player selected, with the fourth overall pick, in the 1957 NFL Draft. Guard Dick Hill was selected as the team's most valuable player.

The 1956 Michigan State Spartans football team, under head coach Duffy Daugherty, compiled a 7–2 record, was ranked No. 9 in the final AP Poll, and led the Big Ten in scoring offense with an average of 26.6 points scored per game. James Hinsley was selected as the team's most valuable player.

In the final AP Poll, five Big Ten teams finished in the top 15: Iowa (#1); Michigan (#7); Michigan State (#9); Minnesota (#12); and Ohio State (#15). The conference's individual statistical leaders included Purdue quarterback Len Dawson with 856 passing yards, Purdue halfback Melvin Dillard with 873 rushing yards, and Indiana end Brad Bomba with 407 receiving yards. Ohio State guard Jim Parker won the Outland Trophy as the best interior lineman in college football.

1956 Iowa Hawkeyes football team

The 1956 Iowa Hawkeyes football team was an American football team that represented the University of Iowa in the 1956 Big Ten Conference football season. The Hawkeyes were champions of the Big Ten Conference and beat the Oregon State Beavers in the 1957 Rose Bowl, a rematch of a regular season game.

The team's statistical leaders included quarterback Ken Ploen with 386 passing yards, Ploen with 487 rushing yards, Ploen with 873 total yards, and Jim Gibbons with 255 receiving yards. Tackle Alex Karras was selected as a first-team All-American.

1956 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team

The 1956 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Minnesota in the 1956 Big Ten Conference football season. In their third year under head coach Murray Warmath, the Golden Gophers compiled a 6–1–2 record and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 127 to 87. The team finished 12th in the final AP Poll and ninth in the final Coaches Poll.

Quarterback Bobby Cox received the team's Most Valuable Player award. Tackle Bob Hobert was selected by the Football Writers Association of America (for Look magazine) as a first-team player on the 1956 College Football All-America Team. Hobert was also named All-Big Ten first team, Academic All-American and Academic All-Big Ten. Offensive lineman Perry Gehring was named Academic All-Big Ten.Total attendance for the season was 372,654, which averaged to 62,109. The season high for attendance was against rival Iowa.

1956 NCAA University Division football season

The 1956 NCAA University Division football season saw the University of Oklahoma Sooners finish a third consecutive season unbeaten and untied to again win the national championship.

The 1956 season saw the NCAA split member schools into two divisions: larger schools were part of the University Division, later known as NCAA Division I, and smaller schools were placed in the College Division, later split into NCAA Division II and NCAA Division III.During the 20th century, the NCAA had no playoff for the major college football teams in the University Division, later known as Division I-A and now known as Division I FBS. The NCAA did recognize a national champion based upon the final results of "wire service" (AP and UPI) polls. The extent of that recognition came in the form of acknowledgment in the annual NCAA Football Guide of the "unofficial" national champions. The AP poll in 1956 consisted of the votes of as many as 198 sportswriters. Though not all writers voted in every poll, each would give their opinion of the twenty best teams. Under a point system of 20 points for first place, 19 for second, etc., the "overall" ranking was determined. Although the rankings were based on the collective opinion of the representative sportswriters, the teams that remained "unbeaten and untied" were generally ranked higher than those that had not. A defeat, even against a strong opponent, tended to cause a team to drop in the rankings, and a team with two or more defeats was unlikely to remain in the Top 20.

Generally, the top teams played on New Year's Day in the four major postseason bowl games: the Rose Bowl (near Los Angeles at Pasadena), the Sugar Bowl (New Orleans), the Orange Bowl (Miami), and the Cotton Bowl (Dallas). Because the rules of the time for Oklahoma's conference (at that time, Big 7) did not permit consecutive bowl appearances, #1 Oklahoma did not play in the postseason, with runner-up Colorado going to the Orange Bowl instead.

1956 Ohio State Buckeyes football team

The 1956 Ohio State Buckeyes football team was an American football team that represented the Ohio State University in the 1956 Big Ten Conference football season. In their sixth season under head coach Woody Hayes, the Buckeyes compiled a 6–3 record.

The team's statistical leaders included Don Clark with 88 passing yards, Clark with 797 rushing yards, Clark with 885 yards of total offense (second best in the Big Ten), and Leo Brown with 151 receiving yards.

Bill Steiger (American football)

William Steiger (born c. 1933) was an American football player. He grew up in Olympia, Washington, and attended Washington State University. He played college football at the end position in 1955, 1956, and 1958 for the Washington State Cougars football team. As a junior in 1956, he was the second leading receiver in the country in 1956 with 39 catches for 609 yards. He was selected by the Football Writers Association of America as a first-team player on its 1956 College Football All-America Team, and received second-team honors from the Associated Press. In June 1957, he paralyzed in an accident when he dove into a swimming pool in Walnut Creek, California. He underwent surgery and regained his mobility. He missed the 1957 football season but returned to play for Washington State in 1958.

Buddy Cruze

Kyle Layman "Buddy" Cruze (May 24, 1933 – March 10, 2018) was an American football player at the University of Tennessee. A native of Knoxville, Tennessee, Cruze attended Knoxville High School and East High School. He attended Southern Methodist University and thereafter transferred to the University of Tennessee. He played college football at the end position in 1952 for the SMU Mustangs and from 1954 to 1956 for the Tennessee Volunteers. He was selected by the Football Writers Association of America as a first-team player on its 1956 College Football All-America Team. After leaving the University of Tennessee he was 143rd pick overall and drafted by the Chicago Bears in the 1956 NFL Draft. He later signed with the Montreal Alouettes in 1959. He was inducted into the Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame in 2007. He died on March 10, 2018 at the age of 84.

John Barrow (Canadian football)

John B. Barrow (October 31, 1935 – February 17, 2015) was an American college and professional football player who was an offensive and defensive tackle in the Canadian Football League (CFL) for fourteen seasons in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. Barrow played college football for the University of Florida, and was recognized as an All-American. Thereafter, he played professionally for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats of the CFL, and was later inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame.

John Matsko (American football)

John Matsko, Jr. (December 20, 1933 – December 24, 2010) was an American football player. He played Center for the Michigan State Spartans football team and was selected as a first-team All-Big Ten Conference player and second-team All-American in 1956.

Matsko grew up in Cambria County, Pennsylvania. He attended Adams-Summerhill High School in St. Michael, Pennsylvania, and won a total of 12 varsity letters in football, baseball, basketball and track. He was offered a contract to play professional baseball for the Pittsburgh Pirates, but opted to play college football at Michigan State College.Matsko played at the center position at Michigan State and also handled place-kicking for the team. He was captain of the 1956 Michigan State Spartans football team that compiled a 9–1 record and was ranked #9 in the final AP Poll. At the end of the season, he was selected by the United Press (UP), International News Service (INS), and Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA) as a second-team player on the 1956 College Football All-America Team. He was also selected by the Associated Press (AP) as a first-team player on the 1956 All-Big Ten Conference football team. The United Press (UP) selected him as the second-team All-Big Ten center.In August 1957, Matsko played for the college all-stars in Chicago and was in discussions with the Hamilton Tiger-Cats of the Canadian Football League (CFL). He ultimately played for the Calgary Stampeders during the 1959 CFL season.In 1960, after retiring from professional football, Matsko was hired as a junior high school social studies teacher and assistant football coach in Ferndale, Pennsylvania.

Tom Maentz

Tom Maentz (born c. 1934) is a former American football player who played end for the University of Michigan Wolverines from 1954-1956. Maentz played on offense and defense and also served as the punter for the Michigan football team. Maentz and Ron Kramer became known as Michigan's "touchdown twins" and were the first University of Michigan athletes to appear on the cover of Sports Illustrated. Maentz was a second-team All-American in 1955 and captain of the 1956 football team. In 1994, he was inducted into the University of Michigan Athletic Hall of Honor.

1956 College Football All-America Team consensus selections
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