1954 in literature

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1954.

List of years in literature (table)
In poetry
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957

Events

New books

Fiction

Children and young people

Drama

Poetry

Non-fiction

Births

Deaths

Awards

References

  1. ^ Glass, Hildrun (2010). "Câteva note despre activitatea lui Avram L. Zissu". In Rotman, Liviu; Crăciun, Camelia; Vasiliu, Ana-Gabriela. Noi perspective în istoriografia evreilor din România. Bucharest: Federation of Jewish Communities of Romania & Editura Hasefer. p. 166.
  2. ^ Boletin de la Real Academia de la Historia, CXCVIII (iii), Madrid, 2001, pp. 352–546, OCLC 1460620 (in Spanish).
  3. ^ Wagner, Vit (2007-04-16). "Tolkien proves he's still the king". Toronto Star. Retrieved 2014-06-04.
  4. ^ No. 41 in Le Monde's 100 Books of the Century. Savigneau, Josyane (1999-10-15). "Écrivains et choix sentimentaux". Le Monde. Paris.
  5. ^ Leitch, Vincent B.; Cain, William E.; Finke, Laurie A.; Johnson, Barbara E.; McGowan, John; Williams, Jeffrey J. (2001). "William K. Wimsatt Jr. and Monroe C. Beardsley". In Leitch, Vincent B. The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism. New York: W. W. Norton & Co. pp. 1371–1374.
1944 in poetry

Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature (for instance, Irish or France).

1954 in Australian literature

This article presents a list of the historical events and publications of Australian literature during 1954.

For an overview of world literature see 1954 in literature.

See also:

1953 in Australian literature,

1954 in Australia,

1955 in Australian literature.

1954 in New Zealand

The following lists events that happened during 1954 in New Zealand.

Anti-poetry

Anti-poetry is an art movement that attempts to break away from the normal conventions of traditional poetry. Early proponents of anti-poetry include chilean Nicanor Parra and greek Elias Petropoulos.

Parra, known as the father of anti-poetry, published his first collection of antipoems in 1954 and sought to reject the belief that verse holds any mystical power. The poems have been described as prose-like, irreverent, and illuminating the problems of human existence.Elias Petropoulos had tried to describe the art of Anti-poetry. This was in his “notebook” Indeed, in Berlin; containing verses that included intentionally made mistakes in regard to prosody, grammar and rhyme. The inspiration for many of Mr. Petropoulos poems had been the harsh, and sad atmosphere of the wall divided German metropolis where he was residing. Mr. Petropoulos had long come to the conclusion that poetry about love and desires was becoming too gentle for the literature of modern age. Rather it was time to introduce anti-poetry by incorporating anti-sentimentalism feelings and reaction within poems.

At Cooloolah

At Cooloolah is a poem by Australian poet Judith Wright. It was first published in The Bulletin magazine on 7 July 1954, and later in the poet's poetry collection The Two Fires (1955). The poem has also been printed under the titles "At Cooloola" and "At Lake Coolooah".

Book of My Mother

Book of My Mother (French: Le Livre de ma mère) is a 1954 memoir by the Swiss writer Albert Cohen. It focuses on the life of Cohen's mother. It was published in English in 1997.

List of years in literature

This page gives a chronological list of years in literature (descending order), with notable publications listed with their respective years and a small selection of notable events. The time covered in individual years covers Renaissance, Baroque and Modern literature, while Medieval literature is resolved by century.

Note: List of years in poetry exists specifically for poetry.

See Table of years in literature for an overview of all "year in literature" pages.

Normance

Normance is a 1954 novel by the French writer Louis-Ferdinand Céline. The story is a fictionalised version of the author's experiences during the last parts of World War II, where he supported the Nazis. It is the sequel to Céline's 1952 novel Fable for Another Time, and has the subtitle Fable for Another Time II (Féerie pour une autre fois II).

Philip and the Others

Philip and the Others (Dutch: Philip en de anderen) is a 1954 novel by Dutch writer Cees Nooteboom. It was Nooteboom's first novel. He wrote the first chapter when working in a bank, sent it to a publisher, and was offered 300 guilders to finish the book, which then took two months. The book won the Anne Frank Prize.

The Last of the Masters

"The Last of the Masters" (also known as "Protection Agency") is a science fiction novelette by American writer Philip K. Dick. The original manuscript of the story was received by the Scott Meredith Literary Agency on July 15, 1953, and the story was published by the Hanro Corporation in the final issue of Orbit Science Fiction in 1954. It has since been reprinted in several Philip K. Dick story collections, beginning with The Golden Man in 1980.

"The Last of the Masters" depicts a society 200 years after a global anarchist revolution has toppled the national governments of the world (the exact year is unstated). Civilization has stagnated due to the loss of scientific knowledge and industry during the now-legendary revolt. Elsewhere, the last state, governing a highly centralized and efficient society, conceals itself from the Anarchist League, a global militia preventing the recreation of any government. When three agents of the League are sent to investigate rumors of the microstate's existence, the government arranges for them to be killed, leading to the death of one and the capture of another. Tensions rapidly escalate after the agents of the state realize that the third has escaped. Assuming he will report the state's existence, the government mobilizes for total war. In actuality, the surviving anarchist elects to attempt his comrades' rescue and assassinate the head of state: the last surviving "government robot".

The primary theme of the story is the conflict between anarchism and statism, the political and ethical dimensions of which are explored through the characters' dialogue. Though the attention the story received was limited prior to the author's death in 1982, it has since seen greater circulation in Philip K. Dick story collections, and has been reviewed and analyzed for its postmodern critique of technology and its political implications.

The Lord of the Rings

The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by English author and scholar J. R. R. Tolkien. The story began as a sequel to Tolkien's 1937 fantasy novel The Hobbit, but eventually developed into a much larger work. Written in stages between 1937 and 1949, The Lord of the Rings is one of the best-selling novels ever written, with over 150 million copies sold.The title of the novel refers to the story's main antagonist, the Dark Lord Sauron, who had in an earlier age created the One Ring to rule the other Rings of Power as the ultimate weapon in his campaign to conquer and rule all of Middle-earth. From quiet beginnings in the Shire, a hobbit land not unlike the English countryside, the story ranges across Middle-earth, following the course of the War of the Ring through the eyes of its characters, not only the hobbits Frodo Baggins, Samwise "Sam" Gamgee, Meriadoc "Merry" Brandybuck and Peregrin "Pippin" Took, but also the hobbits' chief allies and travelling companions: the Men, Aragorn, a Ranger of the North, and Boromir, a Captain of Gondor; Gimli, a Dwarf warrior; Legolas Greenleaf, an Elven prince; and Gandalf, a wizard.

The work was initially intended by Tolkien to be one volume of a two-volume set, the other to be The Silmarillion, but this idea was dismissed by his publisher. For economic reasons, The Lord of the Rings was published in three volumes over the course of a year from 29 July 1954 to 20 October 1955. The three volumes were titled The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers and The Return of the King. Structurally, the novel is divided internally into six books, two per volume, with several appendices of background material included at the end. Some editions combine the entire work into a single volume. The Lord of the Rings has since been reprinted numerous times and translated into 38 languages.

Tolkien's work has been the subject of extensive analysis of its themes and origins. Although a major work in itself, the story was only the last movement of a larger epic Tolkien had worked on since 1917, in a process he described as mythopoeia. Influences on this earlier work, and on the story of The Lord of the Rings, include philology, mythology, religion and the author's distaste for the effects of industrialization, as well as earlier fantasy works and Tolkien's experiences in World War I. The Lord of the Rings in its turn is considered to have had a great effect on modern fantasy; the impact of Tolkien's works is such that the use of the words "Tolkienian" and "Tolkienesque" have been recorded in the Oxford English Dictionary.The enduring popularity of The Lord of the Rings has led to numerous references in popular culture, the founding of many societies by fans of Tolkien's works, and the publication of many books about Tolkien and his works. The Lord of the Rings has inspired, and continues to inspire, artwork, music, films and television, video games, board games, and subsequent literature. Award-winning adaptations of The Lord of the Rings have been made for radio, theatre, and film. In 2003, it was named Britain's best novel of all time in the BBC's The Big Read.

The New York Times Fiction Best Sellers of 1954

This is a list of adult fiction books that topped The New York Times Fiction Best Seller list in 1954.

The Thanksgiving Story

The Thanksgiving Story, written by Alice Dalgliesh and illustrated by Helen Sewell, is a 1954 picture book published by Demco Media and Charles Scribner's Sons. The Thanksgiving Story was the runner-up for the Caldecott Medal for 1955 and is a Caldecott Honor Medal book. The Thanksgiving Story was reprinted in paperback by Aladdin Paperbacks in 1985 and reissued in hardcover by Atheneum Books for Young Readers in 1988.

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