1954 Asian Games

The 1954 Asian Games (Filipino: Palarong Asyano 1954), officially known as the Second Asian GamesManila 1954 was a multi-sport event held in Manila, Philippines from May 1 to 9, 1954. A total of 970 athletes from 19 Asian National Olympic Committees (NOCs) competed in 76 events from eight sports. The number of participating NOCs and athletes were larger than the previous Asian Games held in New Delhi in 1951. This edition of the games has a different twist where it did not implement a medal tally system to determine the overall champion but a pointing system. The pointing system is a complex system where each athlete were given points according to their achievement like position in athletics or in swimming. In the end the pointing system showed to be worthless as it simply ranked the nations the same way in the medal tally system. The pointing system was not implemented in future games ever since.[3] Jorge B. Vargas was the head of the Philippine Amateur Athletic Federation (In 1976, was renamed as Philippine Olympic Committee) and the Manila Asian Games Organizing Committee. With the second-place finish of the Philippines, only around 9,000 spectators attended the closing ceremony at the Rizal Memorial Stadium.[4] The events were broadcast on radio live at DZRH and DZAQ-TV ABS-3 on delayed telecast.

II Asian Games
2nd Asiad
CountryPhilippines
MottoEver Onward
Nations participating18
Athletes participating970
Events77 in 8 sports
Opening ceremonyMay 1
Closing ceremonyMay 9
Officially opened byRamon Magsaysay
President of the Philippines
Athlete's OathMartin Gison
Judge's OathAntonio Delas Alas [1]
Torch lighterEnriquito Beech[2]
New Delhi 1951 Tokyo 1958  >
Asian Games Medal 1954 - Manila
1954 Asian Games Gold Medal

Opening ceremony

The Games were formally opened by President Ramon Magsaysay on May 1, 1954, at 16:02 local time. Around 20,000 spectators filled the Rizal Memorial Stadium in Malate, Manila for the opening ceremony. As requested by the IOC, the torch relay and lighting of the cauldron were excluded from the Opening Ceremony to preserve the tradition of the Olympic Games. The torch ceremony were returned at the 1958 Asian Games. The host however gave a solution by giving a special citation to the last athlete to enter the parade. The Philippines, as host, was the last country to enter the stadium. The flag bearer for the Philippines squad was Andres Franco, who won a gold medal in the 1951 Asian Games in high jump event, the sole gold medal of any Filipino in the athletics events of the previous Asian Games.[5][6]

Sports

A map of Philippines with Manila marked in the north of the country.
A map of Philippines with Manila marked in the north of the country.
Manila
Location of Manila in Philippines.

The 1954 Asian Games featured eight sports divided into 10 events, aquatics included three events namely diving, swimming and water polo. This version of the Asian Games comprised more sports and events than the last one, as six sports and seven events were in the calendar of 1951 Asian Games. Three sports—boxing, shooting and wrestling—made their debut, while cycling was dropped out.[7]

Participating nations

1954 Asian Games participating countries
Participating NOCs.

National Olympic Committees (NOCs) are named and arranged according to their official IOC country codes and designations at the time.

Calendar

In the following calendar for the 1954 Asian Games, each blue box represents an event competition, such as a qualification round, on that day. The yellow boxes represent days during which medal-awarding finals for a sport were held. The numeral indicates the number of event finals for each sport held that day. On the left, the calendar lists each sport with events held during the Games, and at the right, how many gold medals were won in that sport. There is a key at the top of the calendar to aid the reader.

OC Opening ceremony Event competitions 1 Event finals CC Closing ceremony
May 1954 1st
Sat
2nd
Sun
3rd
Mon
4th
Tue
5th
Wed
6th
Thu
7th
Fri
8th
Sat
9th
Sun
Gold
medals
Athletics pictogram.svg Athletics 4 5 9 12 30
Basketball pictogram.svg Basketball 1 1
Boxing pictogram.svg Boxing 7 7
Diving pictogram.svg Diving 1 1 1 1 4
Football pictogram.svg Football 1 1
Shooting pictogram.svg Shooting 1 1 1 2 1 6
Swimming pictogram.svg Swimming 1 1 5 6 13
Water polo pictogram.svg Water polo 1 1
Weightlifting pictogram.svg Weightlifting 1 3 3 7
Wrestling pictogram.svg Wrestling 7 7
Total gold medals 4 13 10 15 5 10 20
Ceremonies OC CC
May 1954 1st
Sat
2nd
Sun
3rd
Mon
4th
Tue
5th
Wed
6th
Thu
7th
Fri
8th
Sat
9th
Sun
Gold
medals

Medal table

Japan led the medal table, athletes from Japan won most medals, including most gold, silver and bronze. Host nation, Philippines finished second with 45 total medals (including 14 gold).[8]

The top ten ranked NOCs at these Games are listed below. The host nation, Philippines, is highlighted.

  *   Host nation (Philippines)

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Japan (JPN)38362498
2 Philippines (PHI)*14141745
3 South Korea (KOR)86519
4 Pakistan (PAK)56213
5 India (IND)54817
6 Republic of China (ROC)24713
7 Israel (ISR)2114
8 Burma (BIR)2024
9 Singapore (SGP)1449
10 Ceylon (CEY)0112
11–13Remaining0145
Totals (13 nations)777775229

References

  1. ^ Not formally named as Judge's Oath, it was a tradition then when an officiating representative (Judge) of the host nation formally approach the Head of State to read a statement from the Sport Officers and to request the Head of State to formally open the games.
  2. ^ As requested by the IOC, the torch relay and lighting of the cauldron were excluded from the Opening Ceremony to preserve the tradition of the Olympic Games. The torch ceremony were returned at the 1958 Asian Games. The host however gave a solution by giving a special citation to the last athlete to enter the parade. The Philippines, as host, was the last country to enter the stadium.
  3. ^ Manila Times May 9, 1954
  4. ^ Manila Times May 10, 1954
  5. ^ Manila Times May 2, 1954
  6. ^ "Asian Games – Men – High jump". gbrathletics.com. Athletics Weekly. Archived from the original on 15 June 2011. Retrieved July 11, 2011.
  7. ^ "Report of the First Asian Games held at New Delhi" (PDF). la84foundation.org. LA84 Foundation. Archived (PDF) from the original on 11 July 2011. Retrieved July 11, 2011.
  8. ^ "Overall medal standings – Manila 1954". ocasia.org. Olympic Council of Asia. Archived from the original on 2012-03-08. Retrieved July 11, 2011.
Preceded by
New Delhi
Asian Games
Manila

II Asiad (1954)
Succeeded by
Tokyo
Athletics at the 1954 Asian Games

Athletics was contested at the 1954 Asian Games in Manila, Philippines from May 2 to May 5.

Basketball at the 1954 Asian Games

Basketball was one of the many sports which was held at the 1954 Asian Games in Manila, Philippines. It acted as the Asian qualifying tournament for the 1954 FIBA World Championship in Brazil.

Choi Chung-min

Choi Chung-min (Hangul: 최정민; Hanja: 崔貞敏; 30 August 1930 – 8 August 1983) was a South Korean football player and football manager. He played for the South Korea national team.

Football at the 1954 Asian Games

Football at the 1954 Asian Games was held in Manila, Philippines from 1 to 8 May 1954. All matches took place at the Rizal Memorial Stadium, and were of 80 minutes duration.

Ham Heung-chul

Ham Heung-Chul (17 November 1930 – 11 September 2000) was a South Korean association football player and manager. He was the former South Korea national football team manager and manager of Hallelujah FC.

Ignacio Ramos (basketball)

Ignacio "Ning" Ramos is a former Filipino basketball player and head coach. He was part of the Philippine national basketball team that captured the gold medal at the 1951 Asian Games in New Delhi, India. Ramos coached the San Miguel Corporation team in the Manila Industrial and Commercial Athletic Association, and later, in the Philippine Basketball Association when the team moved there. Ramos was also the head coach of the national basketball team that participated in the 1972 Summer Olympics.

India at the 1954 Asian Games

India participated in the 1954 Asian Games held in the city of Manila, Philippines from 1 May 1954 to 9 May 1954. India ranked 5th with 4 gold medals in this edition of the Asiad.

Israel at the 1954 Asian Games

Israel participated in the 1954 Asian Games held in the city of Manila, Philippines from May 1, 1954 to May 9, 1954.

Japan at the 1954 Asian Games

Japan participated in the 1954 Asian Games held in the capital city of Manila, Philippines. This country was ranked 1st with 38 gold medals, 36 silver medals and 24 bronze medals with a total of 98 medals to secure its top spot in the medal tally.

Malaya at the 1954 Asian Games

Federation of Malaya competed for the first time in the 1954 Asian Games held in Manila, Philippines from 1 May 1954 to 9 May 1954.

Masaru Furukawa

Masaru Furukawa (古川 勝, Furukawa Masaru, born January 6, 1936 in Hashimoto, Wakayama) is a Japanese swimmer and Olympic champion. He competed at the 1956 Olympic Games in Melbourne, where he received a gold medal in the 200 m breaststroke.

Min Byung-dae

Min Byung-dae (Hangul: 민병대, Hanja: 閔丙大; 20 February 1918 – 4 January 1983) was a South Korean football defender who played for the South Korea in the 1954 FIFA World Cup.

Pakistan at the 1954 Asian Games

Pakistan participated in the 1954 Asian Games held in the city of Manila, Philippines from 1 May 1954 to 9 May 1954. Pakistan ranked 4th with 5 gold medals in this edition of the Asiad. In these games however Pakistan got 4th Position, but an athlete Abdul Khaliq dubbed as "The Fastest Man of Asia".

Philippines at the 1954 Asian Games

The Philippines participated and hosted the 1954 Asian Games held in the capital city of Manila. The country ranked 2nd with 14 gold medals, 14 silver medals and 17 bronze medals with a total of 45 medals to secure its second spot in the medal tally.

Republic of China at the 1954 Asian Games

The Republic of China participated in the 1954 Asian Games held in the city of Manila, Philippines from 1 May 1954 to 9 May 1954. They ranked 6th with 4 gold medals in this edition of the Asiad.

Shooting at the 1954 Asian Games

Shooting sports at the 1954 Asian Games was held in Manila, Philippines between 3 and 7 May 1954. Shooting comprised 6 events, all open to both men and women.

There were two pistol events, three rifle events and trap as a shotgun event in the program.

South Korea at the 1954 Asian Games

South Korea, as Korea participated at the 1954 Asian Games held in the city of Manila, Philippines from May 1, 1954 to May 9, 1954. The country was ranked third with eight gold medals in this edition of the Asiad.

Swimming at the 1954 Asian Games

Swimming was contested at the 1954 Asian Games in Manila, Philippine from May 5 to May 8, 1954.

Water polo at the 1954 Asian Games

Water polo was contested for men only at the 1954 Asian Games in Manila, Philippines.

Participating National Olympic Committees
Non-participating National Olympic Committees

Only one country just sent officials.

Summer Games
Winter Games
Nations at the 1954 Asian Games in Manila, Philippines
Events at the 1954 Asian Games (Manila)

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