1952 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1952 throughout the world.

List of years in baseball

Champions

Major League Baseball

Other champions

Winter Leagues

Awards and honors

MLB statistical leaders

American League National League
AVG Ferris Fain PHA .327 Stan Musial SLC .336
HR Larry Doby CLE 32 Ralph Kiner PIT &
Hank Sauer CHC
37
RBI Al Rosen CLE 105 Hank Sauer CHC 121
Wins Bobby Shantz PHA 24 Robin Roberts PHP 28
ERA Allie Reynolds NYY 2.06 Hoyt Wilhelm NYG 2.43
Ks Allie Reynolds NYY 160 Warren Spahn BSB 183

Major league baseball final standings

American League final standings

American League
Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
New York Yankees 95 59 .617 --
Cleveland Indians 93 61 .604 2
Chicago White Sox 81 73 .526 14
Philadelphia Athletics 79 75 .513 16
Washington Senators 78 76 .506 17
Boston Red Sox 76 78 .494 19
St. Louis Browns 64 90 .416 31
Detroit Tigers 50 104 .325 45

National League final standings

National League
Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
Brooklyn Dodgers 96 57 .627 --
New York Giants 92 62 .597 4.5
St. Louis Cardinals 88 66 .571 8.5
Philadelphia Phillies 87 67 .565 9.5
Chicago Cubs 77 77 .500 19.5
Cincinnati Reds 69 85 .448 27.5
Boston Braves 64 89 .418 32
Pittsburgh Pirates 42 112 .273 54.5

Events

January

February

  • February 16 – Hall of Famer Honus Wagner, 77, retires after 40 years as a major league player and coach. He receives a pension from the Pittsburgh Pirates, with whom he spent most of those years.
  • February 21 – Thomas Fine of Cuba's Leones de la Habana hurled the first no-hitter in Caribbean Series history, a 1–0 masterpiece against Al Papai and Venezuela's Cervecería Caracas. Through 2013, it has been the only no-hitter pitched in Series history.
  • February 26 – Thomas Fine was three outs from consecutive no-hitters in the Caribbean Series, having allowed a single in the ninth inning to break it up, in an 11–3 Cuba's victory over Panama's Carta Vieja Yankees. His 17 consecutive hitless innings pitched record still as the longest in Series history.

March

  • March 24 – St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Bob Slaybaugh is hit in the left eye with a line drive, necessitating an operation to remove the eye. Slaybaugh will pitch briefly in the minors in 1953-54 and then retire.

April

May

June

July

August

  • August 15 – Detroit Tigers pitcher Virgil Trucks hurled his second no-hitter of the season, a 1–0 shutout over the host New York Yankees. Previously, Trucks held the Washington Senators without a hit on May 15. Besides, Trucks is one of five pitchers to throw two no-hitters in a season, being the others Johnny Vander Meer (1938), Allie Reynolds (1951), Nolan Ryan (1973) and Roy Halladay (2010), as one of his no-hitters came in the postseason.[1]

September

October

November

December

  • December 2:

Movies

Births

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Deaths

January

  • January   6 – Frank Oberlin, 75, pitcher who played for the Boston Americans and Washington Senators over four seasons spanning 1906–1910.
  • January   8 – Art Evans, 40, pitcher for the 1932 Chicago White Sox.
  • January 10 – Bones Ely, 88, one of the top defensive shortstops of his generation and also a versatile two-way player, whose 19-season professional career included stints with eight major league teams in three three different leagues in a span of fourteen seasons between 1884 and 1902.[3]
  • January 14 – Rube Sellers, 70, outfielder who played for the Boston Doves in its 1910 season.
  • January 15 – Ben Houser, 68, first baseman who played with the Philadelphia Athletics during the 1910 season, and for the Boston Rustlers and Braves from 1911 to 1912.
  • January 17 – Solly Salisbury, 75, pitcher who played in 1902 with the Philadelphia Phillies.
  • January 20 – Ollie Pickering, 81, outfielder for six major league clubs in three different leagues between 1896 and 1908, who entered the record books as the first ever batter in American League history, when he faced Chicago White Sox pitcher Roy Patterson as a member of the Cleveland Blues on April 24, 1901.[4][5]
  • January 24 – Ángel Aragón, 61, third baseman for the New York Yankees in three seasons from 1914 to 1917, who was also the first Cuban and Latin American player to wear a Yankees uniform.[6]
  • January 24 – Dick Wright, 61, catcher who made four game appearances for the Brooklyn Tip-Tops of the outlaw Federal League in 1915.

February

March

April

May

June

July

  • July   3 – Fred Tenney, 80, first baseman and manager whose career lasted 17 seasons from 1894–1911, who was ranked behind only Hal Chase among first basemen of the Deadball Era, being also considered the originator of the 3-6-3 double play, while leading the National League in putouts in 1905 and 1907–1908 as well as in assists each year from 1901 through 1907, setting a major-league record with 152 in 1905 that lasted until Mickey Vernon topped it in 1949, hitting over .300 seven times and retiring with a .294/.371/.358 slash line, including 2,231 hits, 1,134 runs scored and 688 runs batted in.[11]
  • July 11 – Dutch Leonard, 60, left-handed pitcher for the Boston Red Sox and Detroit Tigers over eleven seasons from 1913–1925, who earned two World Series rings with Boston in 1915 and 1916, while leading the major leagues with an earned run average of 0.96 in 1914, setting a modern-era season record that still stands.[12]

August

September

October

November

December

  • December   6 – Don Hurst, 47, first baseman who played from 1928 through 1934 for the Philadelphia Phillies and Chicago Cubs, leading the National League with 143 RBI in 1932.
  • December 14 – Frank Hansford, 77, pitcher for the 1898 Brooklyn Bridegrooms.
  • December 28 – Deacon Jones, 60, pitcher who played from 1916 to 1918 for the Detroit Tigers.
  • December 29 – Bob Meinke, 65, shortstop who appeared in two games for the Cincinnati Reds in 1910.

Sources

  1. ^ August 25, 1952: Virgil Trucks hurls his second no-hitter of the season. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on February 22, 2018.
  2. ^ 1952 International League season batting and pitching statistics. Baseball Reference. Retrieved on February 22. 2018.
  3. ^ Bones Ely. Article written by Jacob Pomrenke. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 16, 2019.
  4. ^ Ollie Pickering. Cooperstown Expert website. Retrieved on June 16, 2019.
  5. ^ 1901 Chicago White Sox Regular Season Game Log. Retrosheet. Retrieved on June 16, 2019.
  6. ^ Wilson, Nick C. (2005). Early Latino Ballplayers in the United States: Major, Minor and Negro Leagues, 1901-1949. McFarland. ISBN 978-0-786420-12-4
  7. ^ Mike Hopkins. Retrosheet. Retrieved on June 16, 2019.
  8. ^ Deacon Phillippe. Article written by Mark Armour. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 17, 2019.
  9. ^ Phenomenal Smith. Major and Minor League Statistics. Baseball Reference. Retrieved on June 17, 2019.
  10. ^ How Smith became "Phenomenal". Article written by Bob Lemke. Published on February 6, 2012. Retrieved on June 17, 2019.
  11. ^ Fred Tenney. Article written by Mark Sternman. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 6, 2019.
  12. ^ Dutch Leonard. Article written by David Jones. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 6, 2019.
  13. ^ Phil Douglas. Article written by Mike Lynch. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 6, 2019.
  14. ^ Military-related Major League Deaths. Baseball's Greatest Sacrifice. Retrieved on June 6, 2019.
  15. ^ Arky Vaughan. Article written by Ralph Moses. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 5, 2019.
  16. ^ Earl Sheely. Pacific Coast League Hall of Fame. MiLB.com. Retrieved on June 6, 2019.
  17. ^ Spalding's official baseball guide. Page 227. Archive.org website. Retrieved on June 15, 2019.
  18. ^ Fred McMullin article. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on February 22, 2018.
  19. ^ Arlie Latham. Article written by Ralph Berge. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on June 5, 2019.

External links

1952 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1952 followed the same rules as 1951.

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted once by mail to select from major league players retired less than 25 year and elected two, Harry Heilmann and Paul Waner.

Meanwhile, the Old-Timers Committee, with jurisdiction over earlier players and other figures, did not meet.

1952 Caribbean Series

The fourth edition of the Caribbean Series (Serie del Caribe) was played in 1952. It was held from February 20 through February 26, featuring the champion baseball teams of Cuba, Leones de la Habana; Panama, Carta Vieja Yankees; Puerto Rico, Senadores de San Juan and Venezuela, Cervecería Caracas. The format consisted of 12 games, each team facing the other teams twice, and the games were played at Panama City. The first pitch was thrown by Alcibíades Arosemena, by then the President of Panama.

1952 Claxton Shield

The 1952 Claxton Shield was the 13th annual Claxton Shield, it was held in Perth, Western Australia. The participants were South Australia, New South Wales, Victoria and Western Australia. The series was won by the home team, Western Australia.

1952 Little League World Series

The 1952 Little League World Series was held from August 26 to August 29 in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. A team from Norwalk, Connecticut, beat Monongahela, Pennsylvania, by a score of 4–3 in the championship game of the 6th Little League World Series. A team from Montreal, Quebec, Canada, became the first participants from outside the United States in the history of the event.Attendees at the championship game included Frank Shaughnessy, president of the International League, and Will Harridge, president of the American League.

Pesäpallo at the 1952 Summer Olympics

Pesäpallo, the Finnish variant of baseball, was played as a demonstration sport at the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki, Finland.

The ceremonial first feed, or pitch, was thrown at 18:00 on 31 July by Lauri Pihkala, who had created the sport. The teams playing were the Finnish Baseball Federation and the Finnish Workers' Sports Federation. In a match with a shortened schedule, the Finnish Baseball Federation won 8–4.

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