1951 New York Yankees season

The 1951 New York Yankees season was the 49th season for the team in New York, and its 51st season overall. The team finished with a record of 98–56, winning their 18th pennant, finishing five games ahead of the Cleveland Indians. New York was managed by Casey Stengel. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the New York Giants in 6 games.

This year was noted for a "changing of the guard" for the Yankees, as it was Joe DiMaggio's final season[1] and Mickey Mantle's first. The 1951 season also marked the first year of Bob Sheppard's long tenure as Yankee Stadium's public address announcer.

1951 New York Yankees
Mickey Mantle's Yankee Debut
1951 American League Champions
1951 World Series Champions
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s)Dan Topping
Del Webb
General manager(s)George Weiss
Manager(s)Casey Stengel
Local televisionWABD/WPIX
Local radioWINS (AM)
(Mel Allen, Bill Crowley, Dizzy Dean, Art Gleeson)
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1951 New York Yankees
The 1951 Yankees celebrate their victory in the previous season's World Series.
Casey Stengel 1951
Casey Stengel lecturing Yankee players in 1951.

Offseason

Regular season

  • April 17, 1951: Mickey Mantle makes his big league debut for the New York Yankees. The Yankees opponent is the Boston Red Sox.
  • May 1, 1951: Mickey Mantle hits his first major league home run. The game was played against the Chicago White Sox and the pitcher who gave up the home run was Randy Gumpert. The home run was in the sixth inning and was measured at 450 feet.
  • September 18, 1951: Allie Reynolds threw a no-hitter to clinch the American League pennant. It was the first time that a pitcher threw a no-hitter to clinch a pennant.[4]

Season standings

American League W L Pct. GB
New York Yankees 98 56 .636 --
Cleveland Indians 93 61 .604 5
Boston Red Sox 87 67 .565 11
Chicago White Sox 81 73 .526 17
Detroit Tigers 73 81 .474 25
Philadelphia Athletics 70 84 .455 28
Washington Senators 62 92 .403 36
St. Louis Browns 52 102 .338 46

Record vs. opponents

1951 American League Records

Sources: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]
Team BOS CWS CLE DET NYY PHI STL WSH
Boston 11–11 8–14 12–10 11–11 15–7 15–7 15–7
Chicago 11–11 12–10–1 12–10 8–14 9–13 15–7 14–8
Cleveland 14–8 10–12–1 17–5 7–15 16–6 16–6 13–9
Detroit 10–12 10–12 5–17 10–12 13–9 12–10 13–9
New York 11–11 14–8 15–7 12–10 13–9 17–5 16–6
Philadelphia 7–15 13–9 6–16 9–13 9–13 14–8 12–10
St. Louis 7–15 7–15 6–16 10–12 5–17 8–14 9–13
Washington 7–15 8–14 9–13 9–13 6–16 10–12 13–9

Notable transactions

Roster

1951 New York Yankees
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders Manager

Coaches

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
C Yogi Berra 141 547 161 .294 27 88
1B Joe Collins 125 262 75 .286 9 48
2B Jerry Coleman 121 362 90 .249 3 43
3B Bobby Brown 103 313 84 .268 6 51
SS Phil Rizzuto 144 540 148 .274 2 43
OF Gene Woodling 120 420 118 .281 15 71
OF Joe DiMaggio 116 415 109 .263 12 71
OF Hank Bauer 118 348 103 .296 10 54

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
Gil McDougald 131 402 123 .306 14 63
Mickey Mantle 96 341 91 .267 13 65
Johnny Mize 113 332 86 .259 10 49
Jackie Jensen 56 168 50 .298 8 25
Johnny Hopp 46 63 13 .206 2 4
Billy Martin 51 58 15 .259 0 2
Cliff Mapes 45 51 11 .216 2 8
Charlie Silvera 18 51 14 .275 1 7
Billy Johnson 15 40 12 .300 0 4
Bob Cerv 12 28 6 .214 0 2
Jim Brideweser 2 8 3 .375 0 0
Ralph Houk 3 5 1 .200 0 2
Archie Wilson 4 4 0 .000 0 0
Clint Courtney 1 2 0 .000 0 0

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Vic Raschi 35 258.1 21 10 3.27 164
Ed Lopat 31 234.2 21 9 2.91 93
Allie Reynolds 40 221 17 8 3.05 126
Bob Wiesler 4 9.1 0 2 13.50 3

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Tom Morgan 27 124.2 9 3 3.68 57
Spec Shea 25 95.2 5 5 4.33 38
Bob Kuzava 23 82.1 8 4 2.40 50
Art Schallock 11 46.1 3 1 3.88 19
Stubby Overmire 15 44.2 1 1 4.63 14
Jack Kramer 19 40.2 1 3 4.65 15
Johnny Sain 7 37 2 1 4.14 21
Fred Sanford 11 26.2 0 3 3.71 10
Tommy Byrne 9 21 2 1 6.86 14

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO
Joe Ostrowski 34 6 4 5 3.49 30
Tom Ferrick 9 1 1 1 7.50 3
Bobby Hogue 7 1 0 0 0.00 2
Bob Muncrief 2 0 0 0 9.00 2
Ernie Nevel 1 0 0 1 0.00 1
Bob Porterfield 2 0 0 0 15.00 2

1951 World Series

AL New York Yankees (4) vs. NL New York Giants (2)

Game Score Date Location Attendance
1 Giants – 5, Yankees – 1 October 4 Yankee Stadium 65,673
2 Giants – 1, Yankees – 3 October 5 Yankee Stadium 66,018
3 Yankees – 2, Giants – 6 October 6 Polo Grounds 52,035
4 Yankees – 6, Giants – 2 October 8 Polo Grounds 49,010
5 Yankees – 13, Giants – 1 October 9 Polo Grounds 47,530
6 Giants – 3, Yankees – 4 October 10 Yankee Stadium 61,711

Awards and honors

All-Star Game

Farm system

Level Team League Manager
AAA Kansas City Blues American Association George Selkirk
AAA San Francisco Seals Pacific Coast League Lefty O'Doul
AA Beaumont Roughnecks Texas League Harry Craft
A Muskegon Clippers Central League Jim Gleeson
A Binghamton Triplets Eastern League Bill Skiff
B Quincy Gems Illinois–Indiana–Iowa League Dutch Zwilling
B Norfolk Tars Piedmont League Mayo Smith
C Amsterdam Rugmakers Canadian–American League Frank Novosel
C Twin Falls Cowboys Pioneer League Don Trower
C Joplin Miners Western Association Billy Holm
D LaGrange Troupers Georgia–Alabama League Carl Cooper
D Newark Yankees Ohio–Indiana League Bunny Mick
D McAlester Rockets Sooner State League Vern Hoscheit
D Fond du Lac Panthers Wisconsin State League James Adlam

LEAGUE CHAMPIONS: Quincy, Norfolk, LaGrange, McAlester

Newark club folded, July 17, 1951[6]

References

  1. ^ John Drebinger (December 12, 1951). "DiMaggio Retires as Player but Expects to Remain in Yankee Organization". New York Times. p. 63.
  2. ^ Jerry Lumpe at Baseball-Reference
  3. ^ Don Taussig at Baseball-Reference
  4. ^ Great Baseball Feats, Facts and Figures, 2008 Edition, p. 142, David Nemec and Scott Flatow, A Signet Book, Penguin Group, New York, ISBN 978-0-451-22363-0
  5. ^ Billy Johnson at Baseball-Reference
  6. ^ Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 2nd and 3rd editions. Durham, North Carolina: Baseball America, 1997 and 2007

External links

Spec Shea

Francis Joseph "Spec" Shea (October 2, 1920 – July 19, 2002) was a Major League Baseball pitcher from 1947–1955. He played for the New York Yankees from 1947–1951 and the Washington Senators from 1952–1955. He was known as "The Naugatuck Nugget" as a result of him being from Naugatuck, Connecticut, and was named as such by Yankees broadcaster Mel Allen, and was nicknamed "Spec" because of his freckles.Shea originally signed with the Yankees as an amateur free agent in 1940. He spent the 1940 season playing in Amsterdam, winning 11 and losing four while pitching 137 innings. In 1941, he was promoted to Norfolk, where he struck out 154 in 199 innings, and in 1942 he played in Kansas City, where he improved upon his earned run average. He was a member of the United States Military, serving in World War II. He joined in 1943 and served for three years, where he served solely as a soldier and did not play baseball.He was promoted to the Yankees' major league roster at the start of the 1947 New York Yankees season, and made his debut on April 19, 1947. He made his debut against the Boston Red Sox, which was so looked forward to at Naugatuck High School, his alma mater, that the school suspended operations for the day because most of the student body went to New York to root for Spec. As a rookie, Shea played in his first and only All-Star Game, playing in the 1947 Major League Baseball All-Star Game. In the game, Shea pitched the 4th, 5th, and 6th innings, relieving for Hal Newhouser. He allowed one earned run, and was declared the winning pitcher of the All-Star Game.The same year, MLB established the Rookie of the Year Award. In the middle of the season, however, Shea was sidelined for seven weeks due to a pulled neck muscle. Shea finished the season with a 14–5 record in 27 appearances, had the lowest hits allowed per nine innings pitched in the majors with 6.4, had the best win-loss record in the American League with .737%, threw 13 complete games, three shutouts, and had an ERA of 3.07. Shea was in the running for the Major League Baseball Rookie of the Year Award, which went to Jackie Robinson. Shea finished third in voting behind Robinson and Larry Jansen, but would have won the award had the American and National Leagues had separate Rookie of the Year winners. In the 1947 World Series, Shea started games one, five and seven, winning the first two en route to the Yankees' World Series victory.From 1948 to 1951, however, Shea had a combined 15-16 record, continuing to pitch in pain due to a nagging neck injury suffered in 1947. Instead of it being arm trouble as the Yankees believed, it was an issue that was solved by Shea visiting a chiropractor during the winter before the 1951 New York Yankees season. On May 3, 1952, Shea was traded by the Yankees with Jackie Jensen, Jerry Snyder, and Archie Wilson to the Washington Senators for Irv Noren and Tom Upton. In 1952 he had an 11–7 record with a 2.93 ERA, and in 1953 he had a 12–7 record with a 3.94 ERA. He was used in his final two seasons primarily as a relief pitcher, and pitched his final major league game on August 27, 1955.

Robert Redford called Shea during production of the film The Natural for pitching consultation, where he taught Redford how to pitch in an old-time style. Shea died in New Haven, Connecticut, on July 19, 2002 at the age of 81 after having heart valve replacement surgery.

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