1951 Major League Baseball season

The 1951 Major League Baseball season opened on April 16 and finished on October 12, 1951. Teams from both leagues played a 154-game regular season schedule. At the end of the regular season, the National League pennant was still undecided resulting in a three game playoff between the New York Giants and the Brooklyn Dodgers. After splitting the first two games, the stage was set for a decisive third game, won in dramatic fashion on a walk-off homerun from the bat of Giant Bobby Thompson, one of the most famous moments in the history of baseball, commemorated as the "Shot Heard 'Round the World" and "The Miracle at Coogan's Bluff". The Giants lost the 1951 World Series to defending champion New York Yankees, who were in the midst of a 5-year World Series winning streak.

1951 MLB season
LeagueMajor League Baseball
SportBaseball
DurationApril 16 – October 12, 1951
Regular season
Season MVPAL: Yogi Berra (NYY)
NL: Roy Campanella (BKN)
Postseason
AL championsNew York Yankees
  AL runners-upCleveland Indians
NL championsNew York Giants
  NL runners-upBrooklyn Dodgers
World Series
ChampionsNew York Yankees
  Runners-upNew York Giants
Finals MVPPhil Rizzuto (NYY)

Awards and honors

Statistical leaders

  American League National League
Type Name Stat Name Stat
AVG Ferris Fain PHA .344 Stan Musial SLC .355
HR Gus Zernial CHW/PHA 33 Ralph Kiner PIT 42
RBI Gus Zernial CHW/PHA 129 Monte Irvin NYG 121
Wins Bob Feller CLE 22 Larry Jansen NYG
Sal Maglie NYG
23
ERA Saul Rogovin CHW 2.78 Chet Nichols BSB 2.88
SO Vic Raschi NYY 164 Don Newcombe BRO
Warren Spahn BSB
164
SV Ellis Kinder BSR 14 Ted Wilks SLC/PIT 13
SB Minnie Miñoso CLE/CHW 31 Sam Jethroe BSB 35

Major league baseball final standings

American League final standings

American League
Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
New York Yankees 98 56 .636 --
Cleveland Indians 93 61 .604 5
Boston Red Sox 87 67 .565 11
Chicago White Sox 81 73 .526 17
Detroit Tigers 73 81 .474 25
Philadelphia Athletics 70 84 .455 28
Washington Senators 62 92 .403 36
St. Louis Browns 52 102 .338 46

National League final standings

National League
Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
New York Giants 98 59 .624 --
Brooklyn Dodgers 97 60 .618 1
St. Louis Cardinals 81 73 .526 15.5
Boston Braves 76 78 .494 20.5
Philadelphia Phillies 73 81 .474 23.5
Cincinnati Reds 68 86 .442 28.5
Pittsburgh Pirates 64 90 .416 32.5
Chicago Cubs 62 92 .403 33.5

Events

Managers

American League

Team Manager Comments
Boston Red Sox Steve O'Neill
Chicago White Sox Paul Richards
Cleveland Indians Al López
Detroit Tigers Red Rolfe
New York Yankees Casey Stengel
Philadelphia Athletics Connie Mack
St. Louis Browns Zack Taylor
Washington Senators Bucky Harris

National League

Team Manager Comments
Boston Braves Billy Southworth and Tommy Holmes
Brooklyn Dodgers Chuck Dressen
Chicago Cubs Frankie Frisch and Phil Cavarretta
Cincinnati Reds Luke Sewell
New York Giants Leo Durocher
Philadelphia Phillies Eddie Sawyer
Pittsburgh Pirates Billy Meyer
St. Louis Cardinals Marty Marion

See also

References

  1. ^ "Charlton's Baseball Chronology". www.baseballlibrary.com. Archived from the original on July 28, 2013. Retrieved April 4, 2013.
  2. ^ a b c May 15 in Baseball History. Know More About Baseball]. Retrieved on May 15, 2019.
  3. ^ Fenway Park Timeline. MLB.com. Retrieved on May 15, 2019.
  4. ^ Chicago White Sox at Boston Red Sox Box Score, May 15, 1951. Baseball Reference. Retrieved on May 15, 2019.
  5. ^ Firstman, Diane. "And all the Runs were Scored 2 by 2". valueoverreplacementgrit.com. Retrieved August 4, 2018.
  6. ^ "Strange and Unusual Plays". www.retrosheet.org. Retrieved June 13, 2012.
  7. ^ Mackin, Bob (2004). The Unofficial Guide to Baseball's Most Unusual Records. Canada: Greystone Books. p. 240. ISBN 9781553650386.

External links

1951 Boston Braves season

The 1951 Boston Braves season was the 81st season of the franchise and its penultimate in Boston.

1951 Boston Red Sox season

The 1951 Boston Red Sox season was the 51st season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished third in the American League (AL) with a record of 87 wins and 67 losses.

1951 Brooklyn Dodgers season

The 1951 Brooklyn Dodgers led the National League for much of the season, holding a 13-game lead as late as August. However, a late season swoon and a hot streak by the New York Giants led to a classic three-game playoff series. Bobby Thomson's dramatic ninth-inning home run off Dodger reliever Ralph Branca in the final game won the pennant for the Giants and was immortalized as the Shot Heard 'Round the World.

1951 Chicago Cubs season

The 1951 Chicago Cubs season was the 80th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 76th in the National League and the 36th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished eighth and last in the National League with a record of 62–92.

1951 Chicago White Sox season

The 1951 Chicago White Sox season was the team's 51st season in the major leagues, and its 52nd season overall. They finished with a record 81–73, good for fourth place in the American League, 17 games behind the first place New York Yankees.

1951 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1951 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The team finished sixth in the National League with a record of 68–86, 28½ games behind the New York Giants.

1951 Cleveland Indians season

The 1951 Cleveland Indians season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the American League with a record of 93–61, 5 games behind the New York Yankees.

1951 Detroit Tigers season

The 1951 Detroit Tigers season was a season in American baseball. The team finished fifth in the American League with a record of 73–81, 25 games behind the New York Yankees.

1951 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1951 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 18th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 10, 1951, at Briggs Stadium in Detroit, Michigan the home of the Detroit Tigers of the American League. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 8–3.

1951 National League tie-breaker series

The 1951 National League tie-breaker series was a best-of-three playoff series at the conclusion of Major League Baseball's (MLB) 1951 regular season to decide the winner of the National League (NL) pennant. The games were played on October 1, 2, and 3, 1951, between the New York Giants and Brooklyn Dodgers. It was necessary after both teams finished the season with identical win–loss records of 96–58. It is most famous for the walk-off home run hit by Bobby Thomson of the Giants in the deciding game, which has come to be known as baseball's "Shot Heard 'Round the World".

This was the second three-game playoff in NL history. After no tiebreakers had been needed since the American League (AL) became a major league in 1901, this was the third such tie in the previous six seasons. The Dodgers had been involved in the previous one as well, losing to the St. Louis Cardinals during the 1946 season in two straight games. In addition to the 1946 series, the AL had a one-game playoff in 1948.

The Giants won game one, while the Dodgers came back to win game two. After trailing for most of game three, the Giants rallied to win the game and the series. Consequently, they advanced to the 1951 World Series, in which they were defeated by the New York Yankees. In baseball statistics, the tie-breaker series counted as the 155th, 156th, and 157th regular season games by both teams; all events in the games were added to regular season statistics.

1951 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1951 New York Giants season was the franchise's 69th season and saw the Giants finish the regular season in a tie for first place in the National League with a record of 96 wins and 58 losses. This prompted a three-game playoff against the Brooklyn Dodgers, which the Giants won in three games, clinched by Bobby Thomson's walk-off home run, a moment immortalized as the Shot Heard 'Round the World. The Giants, however, lost the 1951 World Series to the New York Yankees in six games.

1951 New York Yankees season

The 1951 New York Yankees season was the 49th season for the team in New York, and its 51st season overall. The team finished with a record of 98–56, winning their 18th pennant, finishing five games ahead of the Cleveland Indians. New York was managed by Casey Stengel. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the New York Giants in 6 games.

This year was noted for a "changing of the guard" for the Yankees, as it was Joe DiMaggio's final season and Mickey Mantle's first. The 1951 season also marked the first year of Bob Sheppard's long tenure as Yankee Stadium's public address announcer.

1951 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1951 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing sixth in the American League with a record of 70 wins and 84 losses.

1951 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1951 Philadelphia Phillies finished in fifth place. The team had won the 1950 National League pennant but in the United Press' annual preseason poll of sportswriters, only 18 out of 168 writers picked the team to repeat as pennant winners; the Giants received 81 votes and the Dodgers 55. Those two teams wound up tied, with the Phillies 23 games behind.

1951 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1951 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 70th season of the Pittsburgh Pirates franchise; the 65th in the National League. The Pirates finished seventh in the league standings with a record of 64–90.

1951 St. Louis Browns season

The 1951 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 52 wins, and 102 losses.

1951 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1951 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 70th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 60th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 81–73 during the season and finished 3rd in the National League.

1951 Washington Senators season

The 1951 Washington Senators won 62 games, lost 92, and finished in seventh place in the American League. They were managed by Bucky Harris and played home games at Griffith Stadium.

1951 World Series

The 1951 World Series matched the two-time defending champion New York Yankees against the New York Giants, who had won the National League pennant in a thrilling three-game playoff with the Brooklyn Dodgers on the legendary home run by Bobby Thomson (the Shot Heard 'Round the World).

In the Series, the Yankees showed some power of their own, including Gil McDougald's grand slam home run in Game 5, at the Polo Grounds. The Yankees won the Series in six games, for their third straight title and 14th overall. This would be the last World Series for Joe DiMaggio, who retired afterward, and the first for rookies Willie Mays and Mickey Mantle.

This was the last Subway Series the Giants played in. Both teams would meet again eleven years later after the Giants relocated to San Francisco. They have not played a World Series against each other since. This was the first World Series announced by Bob Sheppard, who was in his first year as Yankee Stadium's public address announcer. It was also the first World Series to be televised nationwide, as coaxial cable had recently linked both coasts.

1951 MLB season by team
American League
National League
Pre-modern era
Modern era
See also

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.