1951 British Grand Prix

The 1951 British Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 14 July 1951 at the Silverstone Circuit in Northamptonshire, England. It was race 5 of 8 in the 1951 World Championship of Drivers and was contested over 90 laps. The race was the first victory for José Froilán González, and was also the first of many for the Scuderia Ferrari team. Both the team and driver also achieved their first ever pole position during the weekend.

1951 British Grand Prix
Silverstone Circuit in 1950–1951 configuration
Silverstone Circuit in 1950–1951 configuration
Race details
Date 14 July 1951
Official name IV RAC British Grand Prix
Location Silverstone Circuit
Silverstone, England
Course Permanent racing facility
Course length 4.649 km (2.888 mi)
Distance 90 laps, 408.410 km (253.774 mi)
Weather Mild, Dry
Pole position
Driver Ferrari
Time 1:43.4
Fastest lap
Driver Italy Nino Farina Alfa Romeo
Time 1:44.0 on lap 38
Podium
First Ferrari
Second Alfa Romeo
Third Ferrari

Report

José Froilán González was one second quicker than Juan Manuel Fangio in qualifying, achieving the first pole position of his career. It was also the first pole position for the Ferrari team, and the first in the World Championship (excluding the Indy 500 races) not scored by an Alfa Romeo. Nino Farina and Alberto Ascari qualified in third and fourth positions, completing the front row.[1]

González and Fangio shot away almost parallel from the front row of the grid, closely followed by the other Alfa Romeos and Ferraris. Alfa Romeo driver Felice Bonetto, who started in seventh position, was the first man at the first corner, with the Ferrari of González in second position. González took the lead from Bonetto on the second lap with Fangio chasing. The BRM cars of Reg Parnell and Peter Walker were in hot pursuit of the leaders. The team had arrived at the last minute, and had not practiced or even qualified for their debut race, and had started in 19th and 20th positions. Bonetto's Alfa Romeo teammates of Fangio and reigning World Champion, Nino Farina, managed to overtake him to move into second and third places. On lap 6, Fangio began to close in on González; he passed him on the straight on lap 10, and slowly began to draw away. Consalvo Sanesi then pulled into the pits for fuel and new tyres.

The Maserati of John James became the first retirement of the race on lap 23 with a radiator problem, but was soon joined on the sidelines by Louis Chiron, both his Maserati teammates, the Ferrari of Alberto Ascari and Farina. Farina pulled up at Abbey curve after 75 laps with a slipping clutch and his engine on fire. He had set the lap record on lap 38, with a time of 1 minute 44 seconds, an average speed of 99.99 mph, ensuring he still left the weekend with one point. González retook the lead on lap 39 with an overtake at Becketts corner. He kept his lead for the remainder of the race (excluding one lap when he pitted just before Fangio did) extending it to 1 minute and 5 seconds with 5 laps to go, before easing off at the end of the race. The BRM drivers of Parnell and Walker were still battling on, despite the fact they were suffering from hand and feet burns, and would eventually finish fifth and seventh respectively.

The Alfa Romeos of Fangio and Farina pitted twice for fuel, owing to the awful fuel consumption of their cars. They were doing 1 1/2 miles to the gallon, and needed to take on 70 gallons for every stop. Both drivers needed to stop twice, and, owing to the lengthy, minutes-long pit stops of Formula One in 1951, the more fuel efficient Ferrari of González (who only needed to make one stop) was able to overtake the Alfa Romeos and pull out a considerable lead.

González eventually took his own and Ferrari's first victory in a World Championship race by 51 seconds. It was the first World Championship race (excluding the Indy 500) that was not won by an Alfa Romeo. An Alfa Romeo was still in second place though, in the form of the year's eventual champion Fangio. Luigi Villoresi became the second Ferrari on the podium after he finished in third place, two laps behind. Bonetto and Parnell were the other two point scorers at the race, finishing in fourth and fifth positions respectively.

As it turned out, González had actually raced with an older chassis and engine than his teammates, Villoresi and Ascari.[1]

Entries

No Driver Entrant Constructor Chassis Engine Tyre
1 Italy Nino Farina Alfa Romeo SpA Alfa Romeo Alfa Romeo 159B Alfa Romeo 1.5 L8s P
2 Argentina Juan Manuel Fangio Alfa Romeo Alfa Romeo 159B Alfa Romeo 1.5 L8s P
3 Italy Consalvo Sanesi Alfa Romeo Alfa Romeo 159B Alfa Romeo 1.5 L8s P
4 Italy Felice Bonetto Alfa Romeo Alfa Romeo 159A Alfa Romeo 1.5 L8s P
5 Republic of Ireland Joe Kelly Joe Kelly Alta Alta GP Alta 1.5 L4s D
6 United Kingdom Reg Parnell BRM Ltd. BRM BRM P15 BRM 15 1.5 V16s D
7 United Kingdom Peter Walker BRM BRM P15 BRM 15 1.5 V16s D
8 United Kingdom Bob Gerard Bob Gerard ERA ERA B ERA 1.5 L6s D
9 United Kingdom Brian Shawe-Taylor Brian Shawe-Taylor ERA ERA B ERA 1.5 L6s D
10 Italy Luigi Villoresi Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari Ferrari 375 Ferrari Type 375 4.5 V12 P
11 Italy Alberto Ascari Ferrari Ferrari 375 Ferrari Type 375 4.5 V12 P
12 Argentina José Froilán González Ferrari Ferrari 375 Ferrari Type 375 4.5 V12 P
14 United Kingdom Peter Whitehead G. A. Vandervell Ferrari Ferrari 375 tw Ferrari Type 375 4.5 V12 P
15 United Kingdom David Murray Scuderia Ambrosiana Maserati Maserati 4CLT-48 Maserati 4 CL 1.5 L4s D
16 United Kingdom John James John James Maserati Maserati 4CLT-48 Maserati 4 CL 1.5 L4s D
17 United Kingdom Philip Fotheringham-Parker Philip Fotheringham-Parker Maserati Maserati 4CL Maserati 4 CL 1.5 L4s D
18 United Kingdom Duncan Hamilton Duncan Hamilton Talbot-Lago Talbot-Lago T26C Talbot 23CV 4.5 L6 D
19 France Maurice Trintignant1 Equipe Gordini Simca-Gordini Simca-Gordini T15 Simca-Gordini 15C 1.5 L4s E
20 France Robert Manzon1 Simca-Gordini Simca-Gordini T15 Simca-Gordini 15C 1.5 L4s E
21 France André Simon1 Simca-Gordini Simca-Gordini T15 Simca-Gordini 15C 1.5 L4s E
22 France Louis Rosier Ecurie Rosier Talbot-Lago Talbot-Lago T26C-DA Talbot 23CV 4.5 L6 D
23 Monaco Louis Chiron Talbot-Lago Talbot-Lago T26C Talbot 23CV 4.5 L6 D
24 France Philippe Étancelin1 Philippe Étancelin Talbot-Lago Talbot-Lago T26C-DA Talbot 23CV 4.5 L6 D
25 Belgium Johnny Claes Ecurie Belge Talbot-Lago Talbot-Lago T26C-DA Talbot 23CV 4.5 L6 D
Sources:[2][3][4]
^1 — Maurice Trintignant, Robert Manzon, André Simon and Philippe Étancelin all withdrew from the event prior to practice.[5]

Classification

Qualifying

Pos No Driver Constructor Time Gap
1 12 Argentina José Froilán González Ferrari 1:43.4
2 2 Argentina Juan Manuel Fangio Alfa Romeo 1:44.4 + 1.0
3 1 Italy Nino Farina Alfa Romeo 1:45.0 + 1.6
4 11 Italy Alberto Ascari Ferrari 1:45.4 + 2.0
5 10 Italy Luigi Villoresi Ferrari 1:45.8 + 2.4
6 3 Italy Consalvo Sanesi Alfa Romeo 1:50.2 + 6.8
7 4 Italy Felice Bonetto Alfa Romeo 1:52.0 + 8.6
8 14 United Kingdom Peter Whitehead Ferrari 1:54.6 + 11.2
9 22 France Louis Rosier Talbot-Lago-Talbot 1:56.0 + 12.6
10 8 United Kingdom Bob Gerard ERA 1:57.0 + 13.6
11 18 United Kingdom Duncan Hamilton Talbot-Lago-Talbot 1:57.2 + 13.8
12 9 United Kingdom Brian Shawe-Taylor ERA 1:58.2 + 14.8
13 23 Monaco Louis Chiron Talbot-Lago-Talbot 2:00.2 + 16.8
14 25 Belgium Johnny Claes Talbot-Lago-Talbot 2:05.8 + 22.4
15 15 United Kingdom David Murray Maserati 2:06.0 + 22.6
16 17 United Kingdom Philip Fotheringham-Parker Maserati 2:13.2 + 29.8
17 16 United Kingdom John James Maserati 2:17.0 + 33.6
18 5 Republic of Ireland Joe Kelly Alta 2:18.4 + 35.0
19 7 United Kingdom Peter Walker BRM No time
20 6 United Kingdom Reg Parnell BRM No time
DNA 19 France Maurice Trintignant Simca-Gordini
DNA 20 France Robert Manzon Simca-Gordini
DNA 21 France André Simon Simca-Gordini
DNA 24 France Philippe Étancelin Talbot-Lago-Talbot
Source:[6]

Race

Pos No Driver Constructor Laps Time/retired Grid Points
1 12 Argentina José Froilán González Ferrari 90 2:42:18.2 1 8
2 2 Argentina Juan Manuel Fangio Alfa Romeo 90 +51.0 2 6
3 10 Italy Luigi Villoresi Ferrari 88 +2 laps 5 4
4 4 Italy Felice Bonetto Alfa Romeo 87 +3 laps 7 3
5 6 United Kingdom Reg Parnell BRM 85 +5 laps 20 2
6 3 Italy Consalvo Sanesi Alfa Romeo 84 +6 laps 6
7 7 United Kingdom Peter Walker BRM 84 +6 laps 19
8 9 United Kingdom Brian Shawe-Taylor ERA 84 +6 laps 12
9 14 United Kingdom Peter Whitehead Ferrari 83 +7 laps 8
10 22 France Louis Rosier Talbot-Lago-Talbot 83 +7 laps 9
11 8 United Kingdom Bob Gerard ERA 82 +8 laps 10
12 18 United Kingdom Duncan Hamilton Talbot-Lago-Talbot 81 +9 laps 11
13 25 Belgium Johnny Claes Talbot-Lago-Talbot 80 +10 laps 14
Ret 1 Italy Nino Farina Alfa Romeo 75 Clutch 3 11
NC 5 Republic of Ireland Joe Kelly Alta 75 Not Classified 18
Ret 11 Italy Alberto Ascari Ferrari 56 Gearbox 4
Ret 17 United Kingdom Philip Fotheringham-Parker Maserati 46 Oil leak 16
Ret 15 United Kingdom David Murray Maserati 45 Engine 15
Ret 23 Monaco Louis Chiron Talbot-Lago-Talbot 41 Brakes 13
Ret 16 United Kingdom John James Maserati 23 Radiator 17
Source:[7]
Notes
  • ^1 – 1 point for fastest lap

Championship standings after the race

Drivers' Championship standings
Pos Driver Points
1rightarrow blue.svg 1 Argentina Juan Manuel Fangio 21
1rightarrow blue.svg 2 Italy Nino Farina 15
1uparrow green.svg 2 3 Italy Luigi Villoresi 12
1uparrow green.svg 5 4 Argentina José Froilán González 11
1downarrow red.svg 2 5 United States Lee Wallard 9
Source: [8]
  • Note: Only the top five positions are listed. Only the best 4 results counted towards the Championship.

References

  1. ^ a b "GRAND PRIX RESULTS: BRITISH GP, 1951". grandprix.com. Retrieved 1 April 2012.
  2. ^ "1951 British Grand Prix - Race Entries". manipef1.com. Archived from the original on 9 May 2012. Retrieved 6 January 2016.
  3. ^ "1951 British GP - Entry List". chicanef1.com. Retrieved 5 December 2013.
  4. ^ "Britain 1951 - Race entrants". statsf1.com. Retrieved 5 December 2013.
  5. ^ "Britain 1951 - Result". statsf1.com. Retrieved 9 January 2014.
  6. ^ "VI RAC British Grand Prix". silhouet.com. Retrieved 25 December 2015.
  7. ^ "1951 British Grand Prix". formula1.com. Archived from the original on 18 January 2015. Retrieved 25 December 2015.
  8. ^ "Britain 1951 - Championship • STATS F1". www.statsf1.com. Retrieved 1 March 2019.
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1952 British Grand Prix
1950 British Grand Prix

The 1950 British Grand Prix, formally known as The Royal Automobile Club Grand Prix d'Europe Incorporating The British Grand Prix, was a Formula One motor race held on 13 May 1950 at the Silverstone Circuit in Silverstone, England. It was the first World Championship Formula One race, as well as the fifth British Grand Prix, and the third to be held at Silverstone after motor racing resumed after World War II. It was the first race of seven in the 1950 World Championship of Drivers.

The 70-lap race was won by Giuseppe Farina for the Alfa Romeo team, after starting from pole position, with a race time of 2:13:23.6 and an average speed of 146.378 km/h. Luigi Fagioli finished second in another Alfa Romeo, and Reg Parnell third in a third Alfa Romeo.

The race followed the non-championship Pau Grand Prix and San Remo Grand Prix (both won by Juan Manuel Fangio), the Richmond Trophy (won by Reg Parnell) and the Paris Grand Prix (won by Georges Grignard).

1951 French Grand Prix

The 1951 French Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Reims-Gueux on 1 July 1951. It was race 4 of 8 in the 1951 World Championship of Drivers and was won by Juan Manuel Fangio and Luigi Fagioli driving an Alfa Romeo. It was the first of three occasions where two drivers would be credited with a Grand Prix win after sharing a car.

The race, which also carried the honorific title of European Grand Prix, saw the World Championship debuts of Aldo Gordini, André Simon and Onofre Marimón. Fagioli's victory, his first in a World Championship race, made him the oldest driver to win a World Championship Grand Prix, a record he still holds.

This race also holds the record for the longest Formula One Grand Prix in terms of total distance needed to cover. 77 laps of the 4.856 mile Reims-Gueux circuit totaled to 373 miles.

1951 German Grand Prix

The 1951 German Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held on 29 July 1951 at the Nürburgring Nordschleife. It was race 6 of 8 in the 1951 World Championship of Drivers.

1951 in the United Kingdom

Events from the year 1951 in the United Kingdom. This is the year of the Festival of Britain and a general election returning Winston Churchill to power.

1952 British Grand Prix

The 1952 British Grand Prix was a Formula Two race held on 19 July 1952 at Silverstone Circuit. It was race 5 of 8 in the 1952 World Championship of Drivers, in which each Grand Prix was run to Formula Two rules rather than the Formula One regulations normally used.

New pit facilities had been built on the straight between Woodcote and Copse corners; the original pits were located between Abbey and Woodcote.

Brian Shawe-Taylor

Brian Newton Shawe-Taylor (28 January 1915 – 1 May 1999) was a British racing driver. He participated in 3 World Championship Grands Prix and numerous non-Championship Formula One races. He scored no World Championship points.

Shawe-Taylor was born in Dublin, Ireland, the younger of two sons of Francis Manley Shawe-Taylor (1869–1920), magistrate and high sheriff for the county of Galway, and his wife, Agnes Mary Eleanor née Ussher (1874–1939). His parents were members of the Anglo-Irish ruling classes; he was related to the playwright and co-founder of the Abbey Theatre, Lady Gregory and a cousin of Sir Hugh Lane who founded Dublin's gallery of modern art.Shawe-Taylor started racing before the war, winning the Nuffield Trophy in 1939. After the war he raced an ERA, with which he tried to enter the 1950 British Grand Prix. The organisers deemed his car to be too old, but he managed to take part in the race anyway, by sharing the Maserati 4CL of Joe Fry. The following year, he practiced a Ferrari entered by Tony Vandervell at the 1951 French Grand Prix, but ultimately Reg Parnell drove the car during the race.His entry was accepted for the 1951 British Grand Prix, despite the fact that he was still campaigning his old ERA, and he finished the race in 8th position as the top privateer, albeit six laps down on the winner. He also raced in the 24 Hours of Le Mans that year, sharing an Aston Martin DB2 with George Abecassis, finishing 5th. He was later seriously injured in an accident at Goodwood, when he spun the ERA and was hit by Toni Branca. Shawe-Taylor recovered but his career was ended.

Shawe-Taylor was the younger brother of the music critic Desmond Shawe-Taylor, and the father of the art historian and Surveyor of the Queen's Pictures, the younger Desmond Shawe-Taylor, LVO.

Consalvo Sanesi

Consalvo Sanesi (28 March 1911, in Terranuova Bracciolini, Arezzo – 28 July 1998, in Milan) was best known as the Alfa Romeo works' test driver in the period following World War II, but he also competed in races with the Alfa Romeo Tipo 158/159 cars in the period before the Formula One World Championship came into being. He competed in five Formula One World Championship Grands Prix, debuting on 3 September 1950. Although, on his day, his experience with the cars meant that he was often one of the fastest men on the racetrack, somehow this rarely translated into good results. He scored only 3 championship points. He found some success driving in sports car racing, continuing into the mid-1960s.

On the 1953 Mille Miglia he posted the fastest stage average speed, 112.8 mph (181.5 km/h), beating greats such as Nino Farina and Juan Manuel Fangio, but on this occasion his car let him down and he failed to finish. A year later he won his class in the Carrera Panamericana.

Sanesi entered an Alfa Romeo in the November 1954 Pan American race in Mexico. In the European touring car class of the event he led at one juncture with a total time of 8 hours,

29 minutes, and 24 seconds. He was overtaken by fellow Italian and Alfa Romeo drivers, Sergio Mantovani and Mario Della Favera. A couple of days later Sanesi

established a 17-minute lead in his car, with the Alfa Romeo marque sweeping the first five

positions of the European touring car division.He gave up front line racing following a near-death accident during the 1964 12 Hours of Sebring race, when following a crash his Alfa Romeo Giulia TZ burst into flames. Only the prompt and courageous actions of Jocko Maggiocommo, a fellow driver watching at the trackside who dived into the flames and pulled Sanesi clear, saved his life. Sanesi was paired with driver Roberto Bussinello in the event.Maggiacomo received a Gentleman of the Road award in November 1964 for his effort in rescuing Sanesi. Maggiacomo was the proprietor of Jocko's Speed Shop in Poughkeepsie, New York. The commendation was presented by the Milan Automobile Club.

Ferrari

Ferrari (; Italian: [ferˈraːri]) is an Italian luxury sports car manufacturer based in Maranello. Founded by Enzo Ferrari in 1939 out of Alfa Romeo's race division as Auto Avio Costruzioni, the company built its first car in 1940. However, the company's inception as an auto manufacturer is usually recognized in 1947, when the first Ferrari-badged car was completed.

In 2014 Ferrari was rated the world's most powerful brand by Brand Finance. In June 2018, the 1964 250 GTO became the most expensive car in history, setting an all-time record selling price of $70 million.Fiat S.p.A. acquired 50% of Ferrari in 1969 and expanded its stake to 90% in 1988. In October 2014 Fiat Chrysler Automobiles N.V. (FCA) announced its intentions to separate Ferrari S.p.A. from FCA; as of the announcement FCA owned 90% of Ferrari.

The separation began in October 2015 with a restructuring that established Ferrari N.V. (a company incorporated in the Netherlands) as the new holding company of the Ferrari group and the subsequent sale by FCA of 10% of the shares in an IPO and concurrent listing of common shares on the New York Stock Exchange. Through the remaining steps of the separation, FCA's interest in Ferrari's business was distributed to shareholders of FCA, with 10% continuing to be owned by Piero Ferrari. The spin-off was completed on 3 January 2016.Throughout its history, the company has been noted for its continued participation in racing, especially in Formula One, where it is the oldest and most successful racing team, holding the most constructors championships (16) and having produced the highest number of drivers' championship wins (15). Ferrari road cars are generally seen as a symbol of speed, luxury and wealth.

Ferrari 375 F1

See also the 340 and 375 road cars sharing the same engineAfter finding only modest success with the supercharged 125 F1 car in Formula One, Ferrari decided to switch for 1950 to the naturally aspirated 4.5-litre formula for the series. Calling in Aurelio Lampredi to replace Gioacchino Colombo as technical director, Enzo Ferrari directed that the company work in stages to grow and develop an entirely new large-displacement V12 engine for racing.

The first outcome of Lampredi's work was the experimental 275 S. Just two of these racing barchettas were built, based on the 166 MM but using the experimental 3.3-litre V12. These were raced at the Mille Miglia of 1950 on April 23. Although one car held the overall lead for a time, both were forced to retire with mechanical failure before the end.

The 275 F1 made its debut at the Grand Prix of Belgium on June 18, sporting the same 3.3-litre (3322 cc/202 in³) version of Lampredi's new engine. With three Weber 42DCF carburetors, a single overhead camshaft for each bank of cylinders, and two valves per cylinder, the engine produced a capable 300 hp (224 kW) at 7200 rpm. Alberto Ascari drove the car to fifth place, marking the end of the 3.3-litre engine.

The 275 was replaced at the Grand Prix of Nations at Geneva on July 30, 1950 by the 340 F1. As the name suggests, the car sported a larger 4.1-litre (4101.66 cc/250 in³) version of Lampredi's V12. Other changes included a new de Dion tube rear suspension based on that in the 166 F2 car and four-speed gearbox. It had a longer 2,420 mm (95 in) wheelbase, but other dimensions remained the same. With 335 hp (250 kW), Ascari was able to keep up with the Alfa Romeo 158 of Juan Manuel Fangio but retired with engine trouble. Although the 340 proved itself capable, it was only the middle step in Ferrari's 1950 car development.

Ferrari achieved the 4.5-litre goal of the formula with the 375 F1, two of which debuted at Monza on September 3, 1950. This 4.5-litre (4493.73 cc/274 in³) engine produced roughly the same power as its 4.1-litre predecessor, but its tractability earned Ascari second place in that debut race. A series of modifications through the 1951 season allowed Ferrari to finally put Alfa Romeo behind it in a Formula One race, with José Froilán González' victory at Silverstone on July 14 becoming the constructor's first World Championship win. Ascari's wins at the Nürburgring and Monza and strong finishes throughout the season cemented the company's position as a Formula One contender.

Changes in the Formula One regulations led the company to shift the big engine to an Indy car, the 1952 375 Indianapolis. Three new Weber 40IF4C carburettors brought power output to 380 hp (279 kW), the wheelbase was lengthened, and the chassis and suspension were strengthened. Although the car performed well in European testing, it was not able to meet the American challenge, with just one of four 375s even qualifying for the 1952 Indianapolis 500. Ascari was the driver who did qualify the car for the race, starting 25th (out of 33 starters) with a qualifying speed of 134.3 mp/h (the pole was won by American Chet Miller who pushed his supercharged Kurtis Kraft-Novi to 139.03 mp/h). Ascari would be classified in 31st place, completing only 40 of the 200 laps before being forced to retire with wheel failure, though he would go on to win the remaining six Grands Prix of the season to easily win his first World Championship from Ferrari teammate Giuseppe Farina.

The big V12 was scrapped for 1954, as Formula One required a 2.5-litre engine. The new 553 F1 adopted Lampredi's four cylinder engine, leaving the V12 for sports car use.

The 375 was driven during the 2011 British Grand Prix weekend by then-current Ferrari driver Fernando Alonso as a tribute to the sixtieth anniversary of the Ferrari's first World Championship Grand Prix win at the 1951 British Grand Prix at Silverstone, with Argentinean driver José Froilán González driving at the time.

Ferris de Joux

Ferris de Joux (1935–2009) was a designer, engineer and constructor of sports cars. He was born on 24 August 1935. de Joux was said to have been one of New Zealand's most talented automotive designers. He appeared regularly in motoring magazines such as Motorman and Sports Car World from the 1970s.

Joe Kelly (racing driver)

Joe Kelly (13 March 1913 – 28 November 1993) was a racing driver and motor trader from Ireland. He was born in Dublin and was raised there, later moving to England. He died in Neston, Cheshire, England.

John James (racing driver)

John Martin James (10 May 1914 – 27 January 2002) was a British racing driver from England who was born in Packwood, Warwickshire and died in St. Julian's, Malta. He competed in one Formula One World Championship Grand Prix. James was an engineer who acquired a Maserati 4CLT/48, and entered the 1951 British Grand Prix, retiring from a damaged radiator after 23 laps. Regulation changes for 1952 limited his Maserati to competing in Formula Libre only, and he competed in several sprint races before retiring from racing.

José Froilán González

José Froilán González (October 5, 1922 – June 15, 2013) was an Argentine racing driver, particularly notable for scoring Ferrari's first win in a Formula One World Championship race at the 1951 British Grand Prix. He made his Formula One debut for Scuderia Achille Varzi in the 1950 Monaco Grand Prix. His last Grand Prix was the 1960 Argentine Grand Prix.

González competed in 26 World Championship Formula One Grands Prix over nine seasons (1950–1957 and 1960) and numerous non-Championship events. In the 26 World Championship races, González scored two victories (the 1951 British Grand Prix and the 1954 British Grand Prix), seven second-place finishes, six third-place finishes, three pole positions, six fastest laps, and 72 ​1⁄7 points. He won the 1951 Coppa Acerbo, in 1954 the 24 Hours of Le Mans with Maurice Trintignant, and the Portuguese Grand Prix for Ferrari.

González's nicknames were The Pampas Bull (by his English fans) and El Cabezón (Fat Head, by his close colleagues).

List of Formula One Grand Prix winners

Formula One, abbreviated to F1, is the highest class of open-wheeled auto racing defined by the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA), motorsport's world governing body. The "formula" in the name refers to a set of rules to which all participants and cars must conform. The F1 world championship season consists of a series of races, known as Grands Prix, held usually on purpose-built circuits, and in a few cases on closed city streets. The most famous Grand Prix is the Monaco Grand Prix in Monte Carlo. Each winner is presented with a trophy and the results of each race are combined to determine two annual Championships, one for drivers and one for constructors. The World Championship for Drivers is held since 1950, after the Formula One standard was agreed upon in 1946. The Constructors' Championship was added for the 1958 season and has been awarded ever since.

Michael Schumacher holds the record for the most Grand Prix victories, having won 91 times. Lewis Hamilton is second with 80 wins and Sebastian Vettel is third with 52 wins. Kimi Räikkönen holds the distinction of having the longest time between his first win and his last. He won his first Grand Prix in 2003 at the Malaysian Grand Prix, and his last (to date) in 2018 at the United States Grand Prix, a span of 15 years and 212 days. Riccardo Patrese holds the record for the longest period of time between two race wins–more than six-and-a-half years between the 1983 South African Grand Prix and the 1990 San Marino Grand Prix. Mario Andretti had to wait the longest time between his maiden victory at the 1971 South African Grand Prix and his second win–coming five years, seven months and 18 days later at the 1976 Japanese Grand Prix. Sebastian Vettel holds the record for the most consecutive wins, having won nine Grands Prix in a row from the 2013 Belgian Grand Prix to the 2013 Brazilian Grand Prix. Max Verstappen is the youngest winner of a Grand Prix; he was 18 years and 227 days old when he won the 2016 Spanish Grand Prix. Luigi Fagioli is the oldest winner of a Formula One Grand Prix; he was 53 years and 22 days old when he won the 1951 French Grand Prix.As of the 2019 British Grand Prix, out of the 764 drivers who started a Grand Prix, there have been 107 different Formula One Grand Prix winners. The first Grand Prix winner was Giuseppe Farina at the 1950 British Grand Prix, and the most recent driver to score their first Grand Prix win was Valtteri Bottas.This list includes the winners of the Indianapolis 500 race between 1950 and 1960, as they formed part of the World Championships, even though they were not run by Formula One regulations, nor are they referred to as Grands Prix.

List of Formula One Grand Prix winners (constructors)

Formula One, abbreviated to F1, is the highest class of open wheeled auto racing defined by the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA), motorsport's world governing body. The "formula" in the name refers to a set of rules to which all participants and cars must conform. The F1 world championship season consists of a series of races, known as Grands Prix, held usually on purpose-built circuits, and in a few cases on closed city streets, the most famous of which is the Monaco Grand Prix in Monte Carlo. The results of each race are combined to determine two annual World Championships, one for drivers and one for constructors.

Ferrari hold the record for the most Grands Prix victories, having won 235 times. McLaren are second with 182 wins, and Williams are third with 114 wins. So far, nine countries have produced winning constructors, apart from six countries regarded as the major competitors, also Canada (Wolf), Ireland (Jordan), and Austria (Red Bull), the three countries without large automotive industry. British constructors have won the most Grands Prix, 15 constructors have won 517 races between them. Italian constructors are second with 255 wins between five constructors. German constructors are third, having won 98 Grands Prix between three constructors. During the first four championship seasons (1950-1953), only Italian constructors won championship races, with the exception of the Indianapolis 500. Five seasons (1973, 1986, 1991, 1992, and 1993) witnessed wins of only British constructors. Since the first win for a British constructor in 1957, British constructors have won races in every season except 2006 and 2014–2019. Only one constructor (Benetton) has achieved victories under two different nationalities.

List of Formula One polesitters

Formula One, abbreviated to F1, is the highest class of open-wheeled auto racing defined by the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA), motorsport's world governing body. The "formula" in the name refers to a set of rules to which all participants and cars must conform. The F1 World Championship season consists of a series of races, known as Grands Prix, held usually on purpose-built circuits, and in a few cases on closed city streets. The polesitter is the driver that has qualified for a Grand Prix in pole position, at the front of the starting grid. Drivers are awarded points based on their position at the end of each race, and the driver who accumulates the most points over each calendar year is crowned that year's World Champion. Out of the 1,007 completed Grands Prix (as of the 2019 British Grand Prix), the driver that has qualified on pole position has gone on to win the race 420 times.Qualifying is traditionally contested on the Saturday of a Grand Prix weekend to determine the drivers' positions on the starting grid. Historically, there have been a number of different qualifying systems; previously, each driver was only allowed a single lap to set his qualifying time. Drivers currently have to compete in three rounds before pole position is determined. The first round known as Q1 is contested by twenty drivers in an 18-minute session, at the end of which the five slowest cars are eliminated. This is followed by Q2, a 15-minute session, where the slowest five are again eliminated. The remaining ten cars contest Q3, the final 12-minute session to determine their places on the grid and who will sit on pole-position.Lewis Hamilton holds the record for the most pole positions, having qualified first on 86 occasions. Michael Schumacher is second with 68 pole positions. Ayrton Senna is third with 65 poles. Senna holds the record for the most consecutive poles; he qualified in first place eight Grands Prix in a row from the 1988 Spanish Grand Prix to the 1989 United States Grand Prix. Sebastian Vettel is the youngest polesitter, he was 21 years, 72 days old when he qualified in first place for the 2008 Italian Grand Prix. The oldest person to qualify in pole position was Nino Farina, who was 47 years, 79 days old when he was polesitter for the 1954 Argentine Grand Prix. As of the 2019 British Grand Prix, 99 drivers have been on pole position in the 1,007 Grands Prix since the first World Championship race, the 1950 British Grand Prix. From 2014 onwards the driver who achieves the most pole positions in a season is awarded the Pole Trophy. The inaugural Pole Trophy was won by Nico Rosberg; the 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018 trophies were won by Lewis Hamilton.

Luigi Villoresi

Luigi Villoresi (16 May 1909 – 24 August 1997) was an Italian Grand Prix motor racing driver who continued racing on the Formula One circuit at the time of its inception.

Philip Fotheringham-Parker

Philip Fotheringham-Parker (22 September 1907 in Beckenham, Kent – 15 October 1981 in Beckley, East Sussex) was a racing driver from England. He participated in the 1951 British Grand Prix driving a privately run Maserati 4CL, but retired from the race after a problem with an oil pipe, scoring no championship points. Later that year, he won the 1951 Scottish Grand Prix, a minor Formula One race at Winfield with this car.

Fotheringham-Parker competed in the 1953 24 Hours of Le Mans race, sharing an Allard with Sidney Allard himself, but the team retired after completing just four laps. He also took part in the 1954 Monte Carlo Rally with a Ford Zephyr.

Walt Faulkner

Walt Faulkner (February 16, 1918 – April 22, 1956) was an American racing driver from Tell, Texas. He moved to Milledgeville, Georgia at the age of two-and-a-half, and to Lake Wales, Florida at the age of eight. He then moved to Los Angeles, California in 1936. Faulkner competed mainly in the National Championship and in stock car races. In 1950 Faulkner became the first rookie to win pole position at the Indianapolis 500. He died in 1956 after a qualifying crash at a USAC Stock Car event in Vallejo, California.

Earlier in his career, Faulkner raced motorcycles and then midget cars for the Edelbrock dirt track racing team. He had great success in midget car racing and was inducted into the National Midget Auto Racing Hall of Fame in 2007. Faulkner was also inducted into the West Coast Stock Car Hall of Fame in 2006.

Formula One Grands Prix (1950–59)
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