1950 United States Census

The Seventeenth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 150,697,361, an increase of 14.5 percent over the 131,669,275 persons enumerated during the 1940 Census.[1] This was the first census in which:

  • More than one state recorded a population of over 10 million
  • Every state and territory recorded a population of over 100,000
  • All 100 largest cities recorded populations of over 100,000
Seventeenth Census
of the United States
Seal of the United States Census Bureau
U.S. Census Bureau Seal
General information
CountryUnited States
Date takenApril 1, 1950
Total population150,697,361
Percent changeIncrease 14.5%
Most populous stateNew York
14,830,192
Least populous stateNevada
162,000

Census questions

The 1950 census collected the following information from all respondents:[2]

  • address
  • whether house is on a farm
  • name
  • relationship to head of household
  • race
  • sex
  • age
  • marital status
  • birthplace
  • if foreign born, whether naturalized
  • employment status
  • hours worked in week
  • occupation, industry and class of worker

In addition, a sample of individuals were asked additional questions covering income, marital history, fertility, and other topics. Full documentation on the 1950 census, including census forms and a procedural history, is available from the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series.

Data availability

Microdata from the 1950 census are freely available through the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series. Aggregate data for small areas, together with electronic boundary files, can be downloaded from the National Historical Geographic Information System. Personally identifiable information will be available in 2022.[3]

State rankings

1950 U.S. State Population Rankings
Rank State Population
1 New York 14,830,192
2 California 10,586,223
3 Pennsylvania 10,498,012
4 Illinois 8,712,176
5 Ohio 7,946,627
6 Texas 7,748,000
7 Michigan 6,421,000
8 New Jersey 4,860,000
9 Massachusetts 4,690,000
10 North Carolina 4,060,000
11 Indiana 3,952,000
12 Missouri 3,946,000
13 Georgia 3,451,000
14 Wisconsin 3,449,000
15 Tennessee 3,304,000
16 Virginia 3,262,000
17 Alabama 3,060,000
18 Minnesota 2,995,000
19 Kentucky 2,957,000
20 Florida 2,821,000
21 Louisiana 2,701,000
22 Iowa 2,621,000
23 Washington 2,386,000
24 Maryland 2,376,000
25 Oklahoma 2,193,000
26 Mississippi 2,169,000
27 South Carolina 2,119,000
28 Connecticut 2,007,280
29 West Virginia 2,006,000
30 Kansas 1,915,000
31 Arkansas 1,906,000
32 Oregon 1,532,000
33 Colorado 1,337,000
34 Nebraska 1,324,000
35 Maine 911,000
x District of Columbia 814,000
36 Rhode Island 779,000
37 Arizona 756,000
38 Utah 696,000
39 New Mexico 687,000
40 South Dakota 652,000
41 North Dakota 616,000
42 Montana 598,000
43 Idaho 592,000
44 New Hampshire 531,000
x Hawaii 491,000
45 Vermont 377,000
46 Delaware 321,000
47 Wyoming 292,000
48 Nevada 162,000
x Alaska 138,000

City rankings

Rank City State Population[4] Region (2016)[5]
01 New York New York 7,891,957 Northeast
02 Chicago Illinois 3,620,962 Midwest
03 Philadelphia Pennsylvania 2,071,605 Northeast
04 Los Angeles California 1,970,358 West
05 Detroit Michigan 1,849,568 Midwest
06 Baltimore Maryland 949,708 South
07 Cleveland Ohio 914,808 Midwest
08 St. Louis Missouri 856,796 Midwest
09 Washington District of Columbia 802,178 South
10 Boston Massachusetts 801,444 Northeast
11 San Francisco California 775,357 West
12 Pittsburgh Pennsylvania 676,806 Northeast
13 Milwaukee Wisconsin 637,392 Midwest
14 Houston Texas 596,163 South
15 Buffalo New York 580,132 Northeast
16 New Orleans Louisiana 570,445 South
17 Minneapolis Minnesota 521,718 Midwest
18 Cincinnati Ohio 503,998 Midwest
19 Seattle Washington 467,591 West
20 Kansas City Missouri 456,622 Midwest
21 Newark New Jersey 438,776 Northeast
22 Dallas Texas 434,462 South
23 Indianapolis Indiana 427,173 Midwest
24 Denver Colorado 415,786 West
25 San Antonio Texas 408,442 South
26 Memphis Tennessee 396,000 South
27 Oakland California 384,575 West
28 Columbus Ohio 375,901 Midwest
29 Portland Oregon 373,628 West
30 Louisville Kentucky 369,129 South
31 San Diego California 334,387 West
32 Rochester New York 332,488 Northeast
33 Atlanta Georgia 331,314 South
34 Birmingham Alabama 326,037 South
35 Saint Paul Minnesota 311,349 Midwest
36 Toledo Ohio 303,616 Midwest
37 Jersey City New Jersey 299,017 Northeast
38 Fort Worth Texas 278,778 South
39 Akron Ohio 274,605 Midwest
40 Omaha Nebraska 251,117 Midwest
41 Long Beach California 250,767 West
42 Miami Florida 249,276 South
43 Providence Rhode Island 248,674 Northeast
44 Dayton Ohio 243,872 Midwest
45 Oklahoma City Oklahoma 243,504 South
46 Richmond Virginia 230,310 South
47 Syracuse New York 220,583 Northeast
48 Norfolk Virginia 213,513 South
49 Jacksonville Florida 204,517 South
50 Worcester Massachusetts 203,486 Northeast
51 Tulsa Oklahoma 182,740 South
52 Salt Lake City Utah 182,121 West
53 Des Moines Iowa 177,965 Midwest
54 Hartford Connecticut 177,397 Northeast
55 Grand Rapids Michigan 176,515 Midwest
56 Nashville Tennessee 174,307 South
57 Youngstown Ohio 168,330 Midwest
58 Wichita Kansas 168,279 Midwest
59 New Haven Connecticut 164,443 Northeast
60 Flint Michigan 163,143 Midwest
61 Springfield Massachusetts 162,399 Northeast
62 Spokane Washington 161,721 West
63 Bridgeport Connecticut 158,709 Northeast
64 Yonkers New York 152,798 Northeast
65 Tacoma Washington 143,673 West
66 Paterson New Jersey 139,336 Northeast
67 Sacramento California 137,572 West
68 Arlington Virginia 135,449 South
69 Albany New York 134,995 Northeast
70 Charlotte North Carolina 134,042 South
71 Gary Indiana 133,911 Midwest
72 Fort Wayne Indiana 133,607 Midwest
73 Austin Texas 132,459 South
74 Chattanooga Tennessee 131,041 South
75 Erie Pennsylvania 130,803 Northeast
76 El Paso Texas 130,485 South
77 Kansas City Kansas 129,553 Midwest
78 Mobile Alabama 129,009 South
79 Evansville Indiana 128,636 Midwest
80 Trenton New Jersey 128,009 Northeast
81 Shreveport Louisiana 127,206 South
82 Baton Rouge Louisiana 125,629 South
83 Scranton Pennsylvania 125,536 Northeast
84 Knoxville Tennessee 124,769 South
85 Tampa Florida 124,681 South
86 Camden New Jersey 124,555 Northeast
87 Cambridge Massachusetts 120,740 Northeast
88 Savannah Georgia 119,638 South
89 Canton Ohio 116,912 Midwest
90 South Bend Indiana 115,911 Midwest
91 Berkeley California 113,805 West
92 Elizabeth New Jersey 112,817 Northeast
93 Fall River Massachusetts 111,963 Northeast
94 Peoria Illinois 111,856 Midwest
95 Wilmington Delaware 110,356 South
96 Reading Pennsylvania 109,320 Northeast
97 New Bedford Massachusetts 109,189 Northeast
98 Corpus Christi Texas 108,287 South
99 Phoenix Arizona 106,818 West
100 Allentown Pennsylvania 106,756 Northeast

References

  1. ^ "Population and Area (Historical Censuses)" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on June 24, 2008. Retrieved June 20, 2008.
  2. ^ "Library Bibliography Bulletin 88, New York State Census Records, 1790-1925". New York State Library. October 1981. pp. 45 (p. 51 of PDF). Retrieved December 15, 2008.
  3. ^ PIO, US Census Bureau, Census History Staff,. "The "72-Year Rule" - History - U.S. Census Bureau". www.census.gov. Retrieved 2015-10-26.
  4. ^ Population of the 100 Largest Cities and Other Urban Places in the United States: 1790 to 1990, U.S. Census Bureau, 1998
  5. ^ "Regions and Divisions". U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on December 3, 2016. Retrieved September 9, 2016.

External links

1952 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia

The 1952 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia were held on November 4, 1952 to determine who will represent the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States House of Representatives. Virginia gained an additional seat, having ten seats in the House apportioned according to the 1950 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms. Until this election, the Democratic Party had won every seat since 1932.

1952 United States elections

The 1952 United States elections was held on November 4. The Republicans took control of the presidency and both chambers of Congress for the first time since the Great Depression. The election took place during the Korean War.

Republican nominee Five-star general Dwight D. Eisenhower defeated Democratic Governor Adlai Stevenson of Illinois. Eisenhower won the popular vote by eleven points, and carried every state outside the South. Eisenhower took the Republican nomination on the first ballot, defeating Ohio Senator Robert A. Taft and California Governor Earl Warren. After incumbent president Harry S. Truman declined to seek re-election, Stevenson won the Democratic nomination on the third ballot, defeating Tennessee Senator Estes Kefauver, Georgia Senator Richard Russell Jr., and former Commerce Secretary W. Averell Harriman. Eisenhower was the first professional soldier to be elected president since Ulysses S. Grant.

The Republicans gained twenty-two seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, gaining a majority over the Democrats. The House elections took place after the 1950 United States Census and the subsequent Congressional re-apportionment. The Republicans also became the majority in the U.S. Senate, gaining two seats.To date, 1952 is the last time both houses of Congress and the Presidency have all flipped in the same election, and it would be the last time the Republicans won the Senate Majority until 1980 and the last time they would win the House Majority until 1994.

1954 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia

The 1954 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia were held on November 2, 1954 to determine who will represent the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States House of Representatives. Virginia had ten seats in the House, apportioned according to the 1950 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms.

1956 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia

The 1956 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia were held on November 6, 1956 to determine who will represent the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States House of Representatives. Virginia had ten seats in the House, apportioned according to the 1950 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms.

1958 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia

The 1958 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia were held on November 4, 1958 to determine who will represent the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States House of Representatives. Virginia had ten seats in the House, apportioned according to the 1950 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms.

1960 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia

The 1960 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia were held on November 8, 1960 to determine who will represent the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States House of Representatives. Virginia had ten seats in the House, apportioned according to the 1950 United States Census. Representatives are elected for two-year terms.

2022

2022 (MMXXII)

will be a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2022nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 22nd year of the 3rd millennium, the 22nd year of the 21st century, and the 3rd year of the 2020s decade.

Allison Gap, Virginia

Allison Gap is an unincorporated community in Smyth County, Virginia. It was defined as a census-designated place (then termed an unincorporated place) at the 1950 United States Census where it had a population of 1,015. It did not reappear at subsequent censuses.

Arlington-Five Forks-Kenwood, Virginia

Arlington-Five Forks-Kenwood was a census-designated place (then termed an unincorporated place) in Prince George County, Virginia, United States. Its first and only designation was at the 1950 United States Census when it had a population of 4,124. Arlington-Five Forks-Kenwood did not reappear at subsequent censuses.

Benedict-Leona Mines, Virginia

Benedict-Leona Mines was a census-designated place (then termed an unincorporated place) in Lee County, Virginia, United States. Its first and only designation was at the 1950 United States Census when it had a population of 1,486. Benedict-Leona Mines did not reappear at subsequent censuses.

Boissevain, Virginia

Boissevain is an unincorporated community and former coal town in Tazewell County, Virginia, United States. It was defined as a census-designated place (then termed an unincorporated place) at the 1950 United States Census under the spelling Boissevaine, when it had a population of 1,197. It did not reappear at subsequent censuses.

Boissevain is served by the Abbs Valley -Boissevain - Pocahontas Rescue Squad Inc - Rescue 945 for Emergency Medical Services.

Brownsville-Brent-Goulding, Florida

Brownsville-Brent-Goulding was a Census-designated place in Escambia County, Florida during the 1950 United States Census, which consists of the communities of Brent, Brownsville, Goulding and West Pensacola. The population in 1950 was 20,269.The census area's name was reduced to just "Brownsville" during the 1960 Census, when the population increased to 38,417. During the 1970 census, the census area was reduced and was reassigned to West Pensacola, with a recorded population of 20,924. The communities of Brent and Goulding were not returned separately by census enumerators until 1980.

Data processing

Data processing is, generally, "the collection and manipulation of items of data to produce meaningful information."

In this sense it can be considered a subset of information processing, "the change (processing) of information in any manner detectable by an observer."

The term Data Processing (DP) has also been used to refer to a department within an organization responsible for the operation of data processing applications.

Dumfries, Virginia

Dumfries, officially the Town of Dumfries, is a town in Prince William County, Virginia. The population was 4,961 at the 2010 United States Census.

Dumfries-Triangle, Virginia

Dumfries-Triangle was a census-designated place (then termed an unincorporated place) in Prince William County, Virginia, United States. Its first and only designation was at the 1950 United States Census and consisted of the unincorporated communities of Dumfries and Triangle. It had a population of 1,585. Dumfries-Triangle was deleted at the 1960 Census as Dumfries and Triangle were designated separately. As of the 2010 Census Dumfries and Triangle collectively have a population of 13,149.

Gertrude Bancroft

Gertrude Bancroft McNally (1908–1985) was an American economist who was chief of the economic statistics section of the United States Census Bureau until 1951, later associated with the Social Science Research Council,

and special assistant to the commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics.Bancroft earned a master's degree in economics in 1934 from the University of Pennsylvania with a thesis on The effect of the War of 1812 on price relations in Philadelphia.

In 1958 she published the book The American Labor Force: Its Growth and Changing Composition (Wiley).

This book, part of the Census Monograph Series produced by the Social Science Research Council in cooperation with the Census Bureau, analyzes the results of the 1950 United States Census and associated data to measure the growth and makeup of workers and unemployed people within the US,

and discover patterns of change in which kinds of people were working and what they did between 1940 and 1950.In 1962, she was honored by the American Statistical Association by election as one of their Fellows for "distinguished service to the field of labor force statistics both in the development of objectively measurable concepts and in the promotion of public understanding of the uses and limitations of labor force data".

Maryland's 7th congressional district

Maryland's 7th congressional district elects a representative to the United States House of Representatives every two years. The seat is currently represented by Elijah Cummings (D). It encompasses just over half of Baltimore City, most of the majority African American sections of Baltimore County, and the majority of Howard County. The district was created following the census of 1950, which gave Maryland one additional representative in the House. It has been drawn as a majority-African American district since 1973.

Portage, Anchorage

Portage is a ghost town and former settlement on Turnagain Arm in Alaska, about 47 miles (76 km) south of Anchorage. This town was destroyed almost entirely in the 1964 Alaska earthquake when the ground in the area sank about six feet (1.8 m), putting most of the town below high tide level. All that remains today are the ruins of a few buildings and a "ghost forest" of trees that died after salt water inundated their root systems. Where there was once a town there is now only a railroad and road junction linking the Seward Highway and the Alaska Railroad to Portage Glacier park and the Anton Anderson Memorial Tunnel, which leads to Whittier.Popular recreational activities in the Portage area include visiting the wildlife center, floating Portage, Twentymile, Placer rivers, Fishing for hooligan in the Twentymile river, and ice skating the numerous marshy areas, creeks, and Portage Lake.

Triangle, Virginia

Triangle is a census-designated place (CDP) in Prince William County, Virginia, United States. The population was 8,188 at the 2010 census. It is bounded to the south by the Marine Corps Base Quantico, which surrounds the town of Quantico.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.