1950 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1950 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 17th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 11, 1950, at Comiskey Park in Chicago the home of the Chicago White Sox of the American League. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 4–3 in 14 innings. It was the first All-Star game to go into extra innings.

1950 Major League Baseball All-Star Game
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 R H E
National League 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 4 10 0
American League 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 8 1
DateJuly 11, 1950
VenueComiskey Park
CityChicago
Managers
Attendance46,127
Ceremonial first pitchConnie Mack
TelevisionNBC
TV announcersJack Brickhouse
RadioMutual
Radio announcersMel Allen and Jim Britt

White Sox in the game

The White Sox hosted the game and were represented by pitcher Ray Scarborough, who did not appear in the game.

Starting lineups

Players in italics have since been inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

National League

American League

Umpires

Position Umpire League
Home Plate Bill McGowan American
First Base Babe Pinelli National
Second Base Eddie Rommel American
Third Base Jocko Conlan National
Left Field Johnny Stevens American
Right Field Scotty Robb National

The umpires changed assignments in the middle of the fifth inning – Pinelli to home, Rommel to first, Conlan to second, and McGowan to third.[1]

Synopsis

Tuesday, July 11, 1950 1:30 pm (CT) at Comiskey Park in Chicago, Illinois
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 R H E
National League 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 4 10 0
American League 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 8 1
WP: Ewell Blackwell (1–0)   LP: Ted Gray (0–1)
Home runs:
NL: Ralph Kiner (1), Red Schoendienst (1)
AL: None

Vic Raschi and Robin Roberts were the starting pitchers for the AL and NL, respectively.

The NL scored first in the top of the 2nd inning, pushing across 2 runs on a single by Jackie Robinson followed by a triple by Enos Slaughter, who then scored on a flyout by Hank Sauer. The AL got 1 run back in the bottom of the 3rd inning, when Cass Michaels scored from third base on a flyout by George Kell. The AL then pulled ahead 3–2 in the bottom of the 5th inning; with runners on second and third with one out, Bob Lemon scored from third base on a flyout by George Kell, and Larry Doby then scored on a single by Ted Williams.

There was no further scoring until the top of the 9th inning, when the NL's Ralph Kiner hit a home run off of AL reliever Art Houtteman, tying the score 3–3. The NL benefitted from five innings of scoreless relief from Larry Jansen, who faced 16 batters striking out 6, while allowing just one hit.

In the top of the 14th, the NL's Red Schoendienst hit a home run off of AL reliever Ted Gray to put the NL ahead 4–3. In the bottom of the 14th, the AL's Joe DiMaggio came to bat with one out and a man on first, but with the crowd on its feet, DiMaggio grounded into a game-ending 5-4-3 double play.

The losing pitcher was the AL's Ted Gray. The winning pitcher was the NL's Ewell Blackwell, who shutout the AL in the final three innings, while facing nine batters and giving up just a single.

References

  1. ^ "National League 4, American League 3". Retrosheet. July 11, 1950. Retrieved October 22, 2016.

External links

1950 Brooklyn Dodgers season

The 1950 Brooklyn Dodgers struggled for much of the season, but still wound up pushing the Philadelphia Phillies to the last day of the season before falling two games short. Following the season, Branch Rickey was replaced as majority owner/team president by Walter O'Malley, who promptly fired manager Burt Shotton and replaced him with Chuck Dressen. Buzzie Bavasi was also hired as the team's first independent General Manager.

Vin Scully joined the Dodgers' radio and television crew as a play-by-play announcer in 1950; in 2016, Scully entered his 67th consecutive season with the club, the longest such tenure in the history of sports broadcasting, that season was the first wherein his voice, as well as of Red Barber's, was broadcast on television station WOR-TV, making the Dodgers the last New York City MLB team to introduce regular television broadcasts, 11 years following the first broadcasts of 1939.

1950 Detroit Tigers season

The 1950 Detroit Tigers had a record of 95–59 (.617), the seventh-best winning percentage in the Tigers' 107-year history. After a tight back-and-forth pennant race, they finished in second place, three games behind a Yankees team that swept the Phillies in the 1950 World Series.

1950 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1950 Philadelphia Phillies won the National League pennant by two games over the Brooklyn Dodgers. Nicknamed the "Whiz Kids" because of the youth of their roster, they went on to lose the World Series to the New York Yankees in four straight games.

1951 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1951 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 18th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 10, 1951, at Briggs Stadium in Detroit, Michigan the home of the Detroit Tigers of the American League. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 8–3.

Cass Michaels

Cass Michaels (Casimir Eugene Kwietniewski; March 4, 1926 – November 12, 1982) was a Major League Baseball infielder. He joined the Chicago White Sox at just seventeen years old, and played twelve seasons in the majors until a beanball ended his career at just 28 years old.

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