1950 Chicago Cubs season

The 1950 Chicago Cubs season was the 79th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 75th in the National League and the 35th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished seventh in the National League with a record of 64–89.

1950 Chicago Cubs
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s)Philip K. Wrigley
General manager(s)Wid Matthews
Manager(s)Frankie Frisch
Local televisionWGN-TV
(Jack Brickhouse, Harry Creighton, Vince Lloyd)
WBKB
(Joe Wilson)
Local radioWIND
(Bert Wilson, Bud Campbell)
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Offseason

Regular season

Season standings

National League W L Pct. GB Home Road
Philadelphia Phillies 91 63 0.591 48–29 43–34
Brooklyn Dodgers 89 65 0.578 2 48–30 41–35
New York Giants 86 68 0.558 5 44–32 42–36
Boston Braves 83 71 0.539 8 46–31 37–40
St. Louis Cardinals 78 75 0.510 12½ 48–28 30–47
Cincinnati Reds 66 87 0.431 24½ 38–38 28–49
Chicago Cubs 64 89 0.418 26½ 35–42 29–47
Pittsburgh Pirates 57 96 0.373 33½ 33–44 24–52

Record vs. opponents

1950 National League Records

Sources: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]
Team BOS BR CHC CIN NYG PHI PIT STL
Boston 9–13 9–13 17–5 13–9 9–13–1 15–7–1 11–11
Brooklyn 13–9 10–12 12–10 12–10 11–11–1 19–3 12–10
Chicago 13–9 12–10 4–17 5–17 9–13–1 11–11 10–12
Cincinnati 5–17 10–12 17–4 11–11 4–18 12–10 7–15
New York 9–13 10–12 17–5 11–11 12–10 16–6 11–11
Philadelphia 13–9–1 11–11–1 13–9–1 18–4 10–12 14–8 12–10
Pittsburgh 7–15–1 3–19 11–11 10–12 6–16 8–14 12–9
St. Louis 11–11 10–12 12–10 15–7 11–11 10–12 9–12

Notable transactions

  • April 1, 1950: Gene Baker was signed as an amateur free agent by the Cubs.[2]
  • June 29, 1950: Harry Chiti was signed as an amateur free agent by the Cubs.[3]

Roster

1950 Chicago Cubs
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders Manager

Coaches

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
SS Roy Smalley 154 557 128 .230 21 85

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
Randy Jackson 34 111 25 .225 3 6
Harry Chiti 3 6 2 .333 0 0

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Bob Rush 39 254.2 13 20 3.71 93

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Frank Hiller 38 153 12 5 3.53 55
Monk Dubiel 39 142.2 6 10 4.16 51
Warren Hacker 5 15.1 0 1 5.28 5

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO
Dutch Leonard 35 5 1 6 3.77 28

Farm system

Level Team League Manager
AAA Springfield Cubs International League Stan Hack
AAA Los Angeles Angels Pacific Coast League Bill Kelly
AA Nashville Vols Southern Association Don Osborn
A Grand Rapids Jets Central League Jack Knight
A Des Moines Bruins Western League Charlie Root
B Decatur Commodores Illinois–Indiana–Iowa League Morrie Arnovich
B Rock Hill Chiefs Tri-State League Dick Bouknight
C Visalia Cubs California League Jim Acton
C Sioux Falls Canaries Northern League Lee Eilbracht
C Springfield Cubs Western Association Bob Peterson
C Clovis Pioneers West Texas–New Mexico League Paul Dean, Harold Hoffman,
Ray Bauer and Chuck Bushong
D Moultrie Cubs Georgia–Florida League Steve Collins and Jim Trew
D Carthage Cubs Kansas–Oklahoma–Missouri League Donald Anderson
D Rutherford County Owls Western Carolina League Halley Wilson
D Janesville Cubs Wisconsin State League Adolph Matulis

LEAGUE CHAMPIONS: Nashville, Rock Hill, Sioux Falls

References

  1. ^ Jim Fanning at Baseball Reference
  2. ^ Gene Baker at Baseball Reference
  3. ^ Harry Chiti at Baseball Reference

External links

Andy Varga

Andrew William Varga (December 11, 1930 – November 4, 1992) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher who played for two seasons. He pitched with the Chicago Cubs for one game during the 1950 Chicago Cubs season and two games during the 1951 Chicago Cubs season. The 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m), 187 lb (85 kg) left-hander allowed two hits and six bases on balls in four Major League innings pitched.

Doyle Lade

Doyle Marion "Porky" Lade (February 17, 1921 – May 18, 2000) was a Major League Baseball pitcher who pitched for the Chicago Cubs from 1946 to 1950. Although nicknamed for his stocky frame, Lade was listed as 5 feet 10 inches (1.78 m) tall and 183 pounds (83 kg).

Born in Fairbury, Nebraska, Lade began his baseball career when he was signed by the Cleveland Indians as an amateur free agent in 1941. He spent the 1941 season with Oklahoma City of the Texas League, where he had a 6–10 record and an earned run average (ERA) of 3.66. At the end of the 1941 season, he was traded to Savannah of the South Atlantic League for Hugh Klaerner. On July 8, 1942, while playing for the Shreveport Sports of the Texas League, Lade pitched a no-hitter against San Antonio and won the game 1–0, with his solo home run providing the only run support for Shreveport. In August, he was purchased by the Chicago White Sox effective at the conclusion of the Texas League season, and was considered the top prospect of the four players acquired.After the 1942 season ended, Lade signed up for military service, and spent the next few years as a member of the United States Coast Guard. When he returned to the White Sox for the 1946 season, he was placed on the original major league roster, but instead began the season for Shreveport. On July 9, 1946, Lade's contract was purchased from the Chicago White Sox by the Chicago Cubs. In his time in the minors in 1946, he won 12 games and at one time pitched 32 consecutive scoreless innings.Lade made his major league debut on September 18, 1946 and played three games for the Cubs, losing two and finished with a 4.11 ERA. During the 1947 Chicago Cubs season, Lade had career highs in games started with 25, games played with 34, inning pitched with over 187, 11 wins, 10 losses, and a 3.94 ERA. By the end of the season, sportswriters were declaring the White Sox giving up Lade to be a "mistake" on their part. Over the next three season, Lade was primarily used as a spot starter. During the 1948 Chicago Cubs season, he played the first two months of the season before being optioned to Los Angeles to the disappointment of Ralph Kiner, who had hit five home runs off of Lade. He was later recalled and finished the season with the Cubs. He finished the season with a 4.02 ERA, five wins, and six losses in 19 games.The 1949 Chicago Cubs season saw Lade continue his role as a utility pitcher, pitching in 36 games, starting 13, and finishing 12, going 4–5 with an ERA of 5.00 in the process. Lade put up similar stats during the 1950 Chicago Cubs season. In 34 games, 12 of which he started, he won five, lost six, and had an ERA of 4.74. He was on the Cubs' roster through the winter preceding the 1951 season, but was cut May 15, 1951 to reduce the Cubs to a 25-man roster. This signified the end of his major league career, with Lade having played his last game on September 29, 1950.Lade died on May 18, 2000 in Lincoln, Nebraska, at the age of 79. He was cremated and is interred at the National Memorial Cemetery of Arizona located in Phoenix, Arizona.

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