1950 Boston Braves season

The 1950 Boston Braves season was the 80th season of the franchise. During the season, Sam Jethroe became the first black player in the history of the Braves.[1]

1950 Boston Braves
Major League affiliations
Location
Results
Record83–71 (.539)
League place4th
Other information
Owner(s)Louis R. Perini
General manager(s)John J. Quinn
Manager(s)Billy Southworth
Local televisionWNAC
WBZ-TV
(Jim Britt, Tom Hussey, Bump Hadley)
Local radioWHDH
(Jim Britt, Tom Hussey, Leo Egan)
< Previous season     Next season >

Offseason

Regular season

Season standings

National League W L Pct. GB Home Road
Philadelphia Phillies 91 63 0.591 48–29 43–34
Brooklyn Dodgers 89 65 0.578 2 48–30 41–35
New York Giants 86 68 0.558 5 44–32 42–36
Boston Braves 83 71 0.539 8 46–31 37–40
St. Louis Cardinals 78 75 0.510 12½ 48–28 30–47
Cincinnati Reds 66 87 0.431 24½ 38–38 28–49
Chicago Cubs 64 89 0.418 26½ 35–42 29–47
Pittsburgh Pirates 57 96 0.373 33½ 33–44 24–52

Record vs. opponents

1950 National League Records

Sources: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]
Team BOS BR CHC CIN NYG PHI PIT STL
Boston 9–13 9–13 17–5 13–9 9–13–1 15–7–1 11–11
Brooklyn 13–9 10–12 12–10 12–10 11–11–1 19–3 12–10
Chicago 13–9 12–10 4–17 5–17 9–13–1 11–11 10–12
Cincinnati 5–17 10–12 17–4 11–11 4–18 12–10 7–15
New York 9–13 10–12 17–5 11–11 12–10 16–6 11–11
Philadelphia 13–9–1 11–11–1 13–9–1 18–4 10–12 14–8 12–10
Pittsburgh 7–15–1 3–19 11–11 10–12 6–16 8–14 12–9
St. Louis 11–11 10–12 12–10 15–7 11–11 10–12 9–12

Roster

1950 Boston Braves
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders Manager

Coaches

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
OF Sid Gordon 134 481 146 .304 27 103
OF Sam Jethroe 141 582 159 .273 18 58

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Johnny Antonelli 20 57.2 2 3 5.93 33

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO

Farm system

Level Team League Manager
AAA Milwaukee Brewers American Association Bob Coleman
AA Atlanta Crackers Southern Association Dixie Walker
A Hartford Chiefs Eastern League Ripper Collins
A Denver Bears Western League Earl Browne
B Evansville Braves Illinois–Indiana–Iowa League Ernie White
B Hagerstown Braves Interstate League Dutch Dorman
B Jackson Senators Southeastern League Willis Hudlin
C Ventura Braves California League Gene Lillard
C Eau Claire Bears Northern League Andy Cohen
D Bluefield Blue-Grays Appalachian League Bill Adair
D Owensboro Oilers KITTY League Travis Jackson

References

  1. ^ Great Baseball Feats, Facts and Figures, 2008 Edition, p. 199, David Nemec and Scott Flatow, A Signet Book, Penguin Group, New York, ISBN 978-0-451-22363-0
  2. ^ Phil Paine at Baseball-Reference
  3. ^ Eddie Stanky at Baseball-Reference
  4. ^ Art Fowler at Baseball-Reference

External links

Bob Hall (pitcher)

Robert Louis Hall (December 22, 1923 – March 12, 1983) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball who played from 1949 through 1953 for the Boston Braves (1949–50) and Pittsburgh Pirates (1953). Listed at 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m), 195 lb (88 kg), Hall batted and threw right-handed. He was born in Swissvale, Pennsylvania.

In a three-season career, Hall posted a 9–18 record with a 5.40 ERA in 89 appearances, including 27 starts, one shutout, eight complete games and one save, giving up 182 runs (16 unearned) on 307 hits and 146 walks while striking out 133 in 276​2⁄3 innings of work.

Hall died on March 12, 1983 after being hit by a car.

Normie Roy

Norman Brooks Roy III (November 15, 1928 – March 22, 2011) was a Major League Baseball pitcher. Nicknamed "Jumbo" and listed at 6 feet (1.83 m) and 200 pounds (90.7 kg), he batted and threw right-handed.Roy was born in Newton, Massachusetts, and grew up in Waltham, where he attended Waltham High School. He was signed by the Boston Braves in 1947, and spent four years with Class-B Pawtucket Slaters (1947) and AAA Milwaukee Brewers (1948–49, 1951) before joining the Braves in the 1950 season.Roy posted a 4–3 record and a 5.13 ERA in 19 appearances for the Braves, including six starts, two complete games and one save. He allowed 38 runs (34 earned) on 72 hits and 39 walks while striking out 25 in 59​2⁄3 innings of work.Roy later returned to the Brewers (1951) and also played for AA Atlanta Crackers (1952). After that he developed severe pitching arm problems and was unable to continue his career. He went 27–15 with a 3.52 ERA in 70 minor league games.Following his retirement, Roy was employed with Raytheon Company for more than 38 years at both the Bedford and Tewksbury locations.Normie Roy died in Nashua, New Hampshire, at the age of 82, following a brief illness.

American League
National League
Franchise
Ballparks
Culture
Lore
Rivalries
Key personnel
World Series
Championships (3)
National League
Championships (17)
World's Championship Series
Championships (1)
National Association
Championships (4)
Division titles (18)
Wild card berths (2)
Minor league
affiliates
Broadcasting

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.