1947 New York Yankees season

The 1947 New York Yankees season was the team's 45th season in New York, and its 47th season overall. The team finished with a record of 97–57, winning their 15th pennant, finishing 12 games ahead of the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Bucky Harris. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they defeated the Brooklyn Dodgers in 7 games. It was the first ever season of the Yankees to be broadcast live on television with WABD providing the television broadcast feed to viewers in the city.

1947 New York Yankees
1947 World Series Champions
1947 American League Champions
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s)Larry MacPhail, Dan Topping and Del Webb
General manager(s)Larry MacPhail
Manager(s)Bucky Harris
Local televisionWABD
Local radioWINS (AM)
(Mel Allen, Russ Hodges)
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Regular season

The 1947 Yankees, led by MVP Joe DiMaggio, won the AL pennant by 12 games over the Tigers. They played the Brooklyn Dodgers in the World Series, winning a close-fought seven-game series that featured memorable moments like Cookie Lavagetto's walk-off double in game 4 and Al Gionfriddo's famous catch that robbed DiMaggio of a potential home run.

Season standings

American League W L Pct. GB
New York Yankees 97 57 .630 --
Detroit Tigers 85 69 .552 12
Boston Red Sox 83 71 .539 14
Cleveland Indians 80 74 .519 17
Philadelphia Athletics 78 76 .506 19
Chicago White Sox 70 84 .455 27
Washington Senators 64 90 .416 33
St. Louis Browns 59 95 .383 38

Record vs. opponents

1947 American League Records

Sources: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]
Team BOS CWS CLE DET NYY PHI STL WSH
Boston 16–6–1 9–13 12–10–1 9–13 10–12–1 15–7 12–10
Chicago 6–16–1 11–11 7–15 10–12 11–11 11–11 14–8
Cleveland 13–9 11–11 8–14–2 7–15 11–11–1 17–5 13–9
Detroit 10–12–1 15–7 14–8–2 8–14–1 11–11 15–7 12–10
New York 13–9 12–10 15–7 14–8–1 13–9 15–7 15–7
Philadelphia 12–10–1 11–11 11–11–1 11–11 9–13 13–9 11–11
St. Louis 7–15 11–11 5–17 7–15 7–15 9–13 13–9
Washington 10–12 8–14 9–13 10–12 7–15 11–11 9–13

Roster

1947 New York Yankees
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders

Other batters

Manager

Coaches

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
C Aaron Robinson 82 252 68 .270 5 36
1B George McQuinn 144 517 157 .304 13 80
2B Snuffy Stirnweiss 148 571 146 .256 5 41
3B Billy Johnson 132 494 141 .285 10 95
SS Phil Rizzuto 153 549 150 .273 2 60
OF Joe DiMaggio 141 534 168 .315 20 97
OF Tommy Henrich 142 440 158 .287 16 98
OF Johnny Lindell 127 476 131 .275 11 67

[1]

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
Yogi Berra 83 293 82 .280 11 54
Charlie Keller 45 151 36 .238 13 36
Bobby Brown 69 150 45 .300 1 18
Ralph Houk 41 92 25 .272 0 12
Allie Clark 24 67 25 .373 1 14
Jack Phillips 16 36 10 .278 1 2
Sherm Lollar 11 32 7 .219 1 6
Frank Colman 22 28 3 .107 2 6
Lonny Frey 24 28 5 .179 0 2
Johnny Lucadello 12 12 1 .083 0 0
Ken Silvestri 3 10 2 .200 0 0
Frankie Crosetti 3 1 0 .000 0 0
Ray Mack 1 0 0 --- 0 0
Ted Sepkowski 2 0 0 --- 0 0

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Allie Reynolds 34 241.2 19 8 3.20 129
Bill Bevens 28 165 7 13 3.82 77
Spec Shea 27 178.2 14 5 3.07 89
Spud Chandler 17 128 9 5 2.46 68
Bobo Newsom 17 115.2 7 5 2.80 42
Vic Raschi 15 104.2 7 2 3.87 51
Bill Wight 1 9 1 0 1.00 3

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Karl Drews 30 91.2 6 6 4.91 45
Randy Gumpert 24 56.1 4 1 5.43 25
Don Johnson 15 54.1 4 3 3.64 16
Butch Wensloff 11 51.2 3 1 2.61 18
Dick Starr 4 12.1 1 0 1.46 1
Tommy Byrne 4 4.1 0 0 4.15 2

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO
Joe Page 56 14 8 16 2.48 116
Al Lyons 6 1 0 0 9.00 7
Mel Queen 5 0 0 0 9.45 2
Rugger Ardizoia 1 0 0 0 9.00 0

1947 World Series

AL New York Yankees (4) vs. NL Brooklyn Dodgers (3)

Game Score Date Attendance
1 New York 5, Brooklyn 3 September 30 73,365
2 New York 10, Brooklyn 3 October 1 69,865
3 Brooklyn 9, New York 8 October 2 33,098
4 Brooklyn 3, New York 2 October 3 33,443
5 New York 2, Brooklyn 1 October 4 34,379
6 Brooklyn 8, New York 6 October 5 74,065
7 New York 5, Brooklyn 2 October 6 71,548

Awards and honors

  • All-Star Game
    • Spud Chandler
    • Joe DiMaggio (starting CF)
    • Tommy Henrich
    • Billy Johnson
    • Charlie Keller
    • George McQuinn (starting 1B)
    • Joe Page
    • Aaron Robinson
    • Spec Shea[2]

Farm system

Level Team League Manager
AAA Kansas City Blues American Association Billy Meyer
AAA Newark Bears International League George Selkirk
AA Beaumont Exporters Texas League Goldie Holt
A Binghamton Triplets Eastern League Lefty Gomez
A Augusta Tigers Sally League Dib Williams and Carl Cooper
A Denver Bears Western League Marty McManus
B Quincy Gems Illinois–Indiana–Iowa League Gordie Hinkle
B Sunbury Yankees Interstate League Walt Van Grofski
B Norfolk Tars Piedmont League Buddy Hassett
B Victoria Athletics Western International League Ted Norbert
C Bisbee Yanks Arizona–Texas League Charlie Metro
C Ventura Yankees California League Mike Gazella and Johnny Sturm
C Amsterdam Rugmakers Canadian–American League Solly Mishkin
C Butler Yankees Middle Atlantic League Dallas Warren
C Twin Falls Cowboys Pioneer League Earl Bolyard
C Joplin Miners Western Association Jim McLeod
D Easton Yankees Eastern Shore League Joe Antolick
D Independence Yankees Kansas–Oklahoma–Missouri League Goldie Howard
D Stroudsburg Poconos North Atlantic League Jack Farmer
D Fond du Lac Panthers Wisconsin State League James Adlam

LEAGUE CHAMPIONS: Twin Falls[3]

Notes

  1. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/teams/NYY/1947.shtml
  2. ^ http://www.baseball-almanac.com/asgbox/yr1947as.shtml
  3. ^ Johnson, Lloyd, and Wolff, Miles, ed., The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball, 2nd and 3rd editions. Durham, North Carolina: Baseball America, 1997 and 2007

References

1947 New York Yankees (AAFC) season

The 1947 New York Yankees season was their second in the All-America Football Conference. The team improved on their previous output of 10-3-1, winning eleven games. For the second consecutive season, they lost to the Cleveland Browns in the AAFC Championship.

Spec Shea

Francis Joseph "Spec" Shea (October 2, 1920 – July 19, 2002) was a Major League Baseball pitcher from 1947–1955. He played for the New York Yankees from 1947–1951 and the Washington Senators from 1952–1955. He was known as "The Naugatuck Nugget" as a result of him being from Naugatuck, Connecticut, and was named as such by Yankees broadcaster Mel Allen, and was nicknamed "Spec" because of his freckles.Shea originally signed with the Yankees as an amateur free agent in 1940. He spent the 1940 season playing in Amsterdam, winning 11 and losing four while pitching 137 innings. In 1941, he was promoted to Norfolk, where he struck out 154 in 199 innings, and in 1942 he played in Kansas City, where he improved upon his earned run average. He was a member of the United States Military, serving in World War II. He joined in 1943 and served for three years, where he served solely as a soldier and did not play baseball.He was promoted to the Yankees' major league roster at the start of the 1947 New York Yankees season, and made his debut on April 19, 1947. He made his debut against the Boston Red Sox, which was so looked forward to at Naugatuck High School, his alma mater, that the school suspended operations for the day because most of the student body went to New York to root for Spec. As a rookie, Shea played in his first and only All-Star Game, playing in the 1947 Major League Baseball All-Star Game. In the game, Shea pitched the 4th, 5th, and 6th innings, relieving for Hal Newhouser. He allowed one earned run, and was declared the winning pitcher of the All-Star Game.The same year, MLB established the Rookie of the Year Award. In the middle of the season, however, Shea was sidelined for seven weeks due to a pulled neck muscle. Shea finished the season with a 14–5 record in 27 appearances, had the lowest hits allowed per nine innings pitched in the majors with 6.4, had the best win-loss record in the American League with .737%, threw 13 complete games, three shutouts, and had an ERA of 3.07. Shea was in the running for the Major League Baseball Rookie of the Year Award, which went to Jackie Robinson. Shea finished third in voting behind Robinson and Larry Jansen, but would have won the award had the American and National Leagues had separate Rookie of the Year winners. In the 1947 World Series, Shea started games one, five and seven, winning the first two en route to the Yankees' World Series victory.From 1948 to 1951, however, Shea had a combined 15-16 record, continuing to pitch in pain due to a nagging neck injury suffered in 1947. Instead of it being arm trouble as the Yankees believed, it was an issue that was solved by Shea visiting a chiropractor during the winter before the 1951 New York Yankees season. On May 3, 1952, Shea was traded by the Yankees with Jackie Jensen, Jerry Snyder, and Archie Wilson to the Washington Senators for Irv Noren and Tom Upton. In 1952 he had an 11–7 record with a 2.93 ERA, and in 1953 he had a 12–7 record with a 3.94 ERA. He was used in his final two seasons primarily as a relief pitcher, and pitched his final major league game on August 27, 1955.

Robert Redford called Shea during production of the film The Natural for pitching consultation, where he taught Redford how to pitch in an old-time style. Shea died in New Haven, Connecticut, on July 19, 2002 at the age of 81 after having heart valve replacement surgery.

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