1947 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1947 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 14th playing of the "Midsummer Classic" between Major League Baseball's (MLB) American League (AL) and National League (NL) All-Star teams. The All-Star Game was held on July 8, 1947, at Wrigley Field in Chicago, the home of the NL's Chicago Cubs.

The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League by a score of 2–1 in 2 hours and 19 minutes.[1]

1947 Major League Baseball All-Star Game
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
American League 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 8 0
National League 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 1
DateJuly 8, 1947
VenueWrigley Field
CityChicago, Illinois
Managers
Attendance41,123
Ceremonial first pitchCommissioner Happy Chandler
RadioMutual
Radio announcersMel Allen and Jim Britt

All-Star managers and coaches

The National League manager was Eddie Dyer of the St. Louis Cardinals, and the NL coaches were Philadelphia Phillies manager Ben Chapman and New York Giants player-manager Mel Ott.[1]

The American League manager was Joe Cronin of the Boston Red Sox, and the AL coaches were Red Sox coach Del Baker and Detroit Tigers manager Steve O'Neill.[1]

All-Star team rosters

The starting pitchers were selected by the respective American and National League managers. The eight position starters were chosen by the fans.[1] Players in italics have since been inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

American League

Fan-elected starters
Position Player Team All-Star Games
C Buddy Rosar Athletics 4
1B George McQuinn Yankees 5
2B Joe Gordon Indians 7
3B George Kell Tigers 1
SS Lou Boudreau Indians 6
OF Ted Williams Red Sox 5
OF Joe DiMaggio Yankees 9
OF Buddy Lewis Senators 2
Manager-elected starter
P Hal Newhouser Tigers 5

Reserves

Pitchers
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Spud Chandler Yankees 4
P Bob Feller# Indians 6
P Jack Kramer# Browns 2
P Walt Masterson Senators 1
P Joe Page Yankees 2
P Spec Shea Yankees 1
P Dizzy Trout# Tigers 2
P Early Wynn[A]# Senators 1
Position players
Position Player Team All-Star Games
C Jim Hegan# Indians 1
C Aaron Robinson# Yankees 1
1B Rudy York# Cardinals 7
2B Bobby Doerr Red Sox 6
3B Billy Johnson Yankees 1
SS Luke Appling White Sox 7
OF Tommy Henrich[B] Yankees 2
OF Charlie Keller# Yankees 5
OF Pat Mullin# Tigers 1
OF Stan Spence Senators 4

National League

Fan-elected starters
Position Player Team All-Star Games
C Walker Cooper Giants 5
1B Johnny Mize Giants 7
2B Emil Verban Dodgers 2
3B Bob Elliott* Braves 4
SS Eddie Miller* Reds 7
OF Enos Slaughter Cardinals 4
OF Harry Walker Phillies 2
OF Dixie Walker Dodgers 4
Manager-elected starter
P Ewell Blackwell Reds 2

Reserves

Pitchers
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Ralph Branca# Dodgers 1
P Harry Brecheen Cardinals 1
P Red Munger# Cardinals 2
P Schoolboy Rowe Phillies 3
P Johnny Sain Braves 1
P Warren Spahn Braves 1
Position players
Position Player Team All-Star Games
C Bruce Edwards Dodgers 1
C Phil Masi Braves 2
1B Stan Musial Cardinals 4
2B Eddie Stanky Dodgers 1
3B Frankie Gustine Pirates 2
3B Whitey Kurowski[C] Cardinals 4
SS Marty Marion Cardinals 4
SS Pee Wee Reese[D] Dodgers 3
OF Phil Cavarretta Cubs 3
OF Bert Haas Reds 1
OF Willard Marshall Giants 2
OF Andy Pafko Cubs 1

* This player did not start.
# This player did not play.

All-Star Game

Ceremonies

The ceremonial first pitch was thrown by Happy Chandler, Commissioner of Baseball.

Starting lineups

American League[1][2] National League[1][2]
Order Player Team Position Order Player Team Position
1 George Kell Tigers 3B 1 Harry Walker Phillies CF
2 Buddy Lewis Senators RF 2 Dixie Walker Dodgers RF
3 Ted Williams Red Sox LF 3 Walker Cooper Giants C
4 Joe DiMaggio Yankees CF 4 Johnny Mize Giants 1B
5 Lou Boudreau Indians SS 5 Enos Slaughter Cardinals LF
6 George McQuinn Yankees 1B 6 Frankie Gustine Pirates 3B
7 Joe Gordon Indians 2B 7 Marty Marion Cardinals SS
8 Buddy Rosar Athletics C 8 Emil Verban Dodgers 2B
9 Hal Newhouser Tigers P 9 Ewell Blackwell Reds P

Umpires

Position Umpire League
Home Plate Jocko Conlan National
First Base Jim Boyer American
Second Base Butch Henline National
Third Base Art Passarella American

The umpires changed assignments in the middle of the fifth inning – Conlan and Passarella swapped positions, also Boyer and Henline swapped positions.[3]

Game summary

Tuesday, July 8, 1947 1:30 pm (CT) at Wrigley Field in Chicago, Illinois
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
American League 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 8 0
National League 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 1
WP: Spec Shea (1–0)   LP: Johnny Sain (0–1)   Sv: Joe Page (1)
Home runs:
AL: None
NL: Johnny Mize (1)

The first three and a half innings were scoreless with four hits between both teams. Johnny Mize hit a home run off of Spec Shea to deep right field in the bottom of the fourth inning to put the National League ahead 1–0. In the top of the sixth, Luke Appling scored from third base as Joe DiMaggio hit into a 6–4–3 double play to again tie the game.[2]

Stan Spence, pinch hitting for Shea, singled to right-center field in the top of the seventh inning, scoring Bobby Doerr from third base to give the American League the lead. Doerr had made it to third after pitcher Johnny Sain failed a pickoff attempt to second baseman Eddie Stanky.[2]

The NL's tying and winning runs in the form of Phil Cavarretta and Phil Masi (pinch running for Johnny Mize) were on third and first bases respectively in the bottom of the eighth inning, with Enos Slaughter at bat. Slaughter grounded out to shortstop Joe Boudreau, and pitcher Joe Page got out of the inning with the AL still on top, 2–1.[2]

Warren Spahn and the National League squad held off any more offense by the AL in the final inning, again giving them a chance to win it in their half of the ninth. Whitey Kurowski grounded out to Bobby Doerr at second and Pee Wee Reese walked to put the tying run on first. Eddie Stanky grounded out to Doerr also, preventing Reese from advancing. Schoolboy Rowe came to bat, pinch hitting for the pitcher Spahn. Rowe flew out to right fielder Tommy Henrich to give the American League a 2–1 victory.[2][3]

American League[2]

Batter  AB    R     H   RBI  BB    K   AVG
Kell, 3B 4 0 0 0 0 2 .000
     Johnson, 3B 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Lewis, RF 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000
     Appling, PH 1 1 1 0 0 0 1.000
     Henrich, RF 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Williams, LF 4 0 2 0 0 1 .500
DiMaggio, CF 3 0 1 0 1 0 .333
Boudreau, SS 4 0 1 0 0 1 .250
McQuinn, 1B 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Gordon, 2B 2 0 1 0 0 1 .500
     Doerr, 2B 2 1 1 0 0 0 .500
Rosar, C 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Newhouser, P 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
     Shea, P 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
     Spence, PH 1 0 1 1 0 0 1.000
     Masterson, P 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
     Page, P 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
TOTALS 34 2 8 1 1 8 .235
Batting:
  • 2B: Gordon (1, Brecheen), Williams (1, Brecheen).
  • TB: Williams 3, Gordon 2, Boudreau, Doerr, Spence, Appling, DiMaggio.
  • GIDP: DiMaggio (1).
  • RBI: Spence (1).
  • 2-out RBI: Spence.
  • Team LOB: 6.
  • With RISP: 2-for-12.

Baserunning:

  • SB: Doerr (1, 2nd off Sain/Edwards).
  • Pickoffs: Doerr (2nd by Sain).
Pitcher IP   H     R    ER   BB    K    HR  ERA WHIP  BF 
Newhouser 3.0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0.00 0.33 10
Shea (W, 1–0) 3.0 3 1 1 2 2 1 3.00 1.67 14
Masterson (H, 1) 1.2 0 0 0 1 2 0 0.00 0.60 6
Page (S, 1) 1.1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0.00 0.75 6
TOTALS 9.0 5 1 1 4 6 1 0.11 1.00 36

National League[2]

Batter  AB    R     H   RBI  BB    K   AVG
H. Walker, CF 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000
     Pafko, CF 2 0 1 0 0 0 .500
D. Walker, RF 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000
     Marshall, RF 1 0 0 0 1 1 .000
Cooper, C 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000
     Edwards, C 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
     Cavarretta, PH/1B 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Mize, 1B 3 1 2 1 1 0 .667
     Masi, PR/C 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Slaughter, LF 3 0 0 0 1 0 .000
Gustine, 3B 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000
     Kurowski, 3B 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Marion, SS 2 0 1 0 0 0 .500
     Reese, SS 1 0 0 0 1 1 .000
Verban, 2B 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000
     Stanky, 2B 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Blackwell, P 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
     Haas, PH 1 0 1 0 0 0 1.000
     Brecheen, P 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
     Sain, P 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
     Musial, PH 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
     Spahn, P 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
     Rowe, PH 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
TOTALS 32 1 5 1 4 6 .156
Batting:
  • HR: Mize (1, Shea; 4th inning, 0 on, 2 outs).
  • TB: Mize 5, Pafko, Marion, Haas.
  • RBI: Mize (1).
  • 2-out RBI: Mize.
  • Team LOB: 8.
  • Team RISP: 0-for-2.

Fielding:

  • E: Sain (1).
  • DP: 1 (Reese-Stanky-Mize).
  • PB: Cooper (1).
Pitcher IP   H     R    ER   BB    K    HR  ERA WHIP  BF 
Blackwell 3.0 1 0 0 0 4 0 0.00 0.00 10
Brecheen 3.0 5 1 1 0 2 0 3.00 1.67 13
Sain (L, 0–1) 1.0 2 1 1 0 1 0 9.00 2.00 5
Spahn 2.0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0.00 0.50 7
TOTALS 9.0 8 2 2 1 8 0 0.22 1.00 35
  • WP: Blackwell (1).
  • Pickoffs: Sain (0; Doerr, 2nd).
  • Umpires: HP – Jocko Conlan, 1B – Jim Boyer, 2B – Butch Henline, 3B – Art Passarella.
  • Time : 2:19.
  • Attendance: 41,123.

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f "1947 All-Star Game". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved September 12, 2009.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h "July 8, 1947 All-Star Game Play-By-Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 12, 2009.
  3. ^ a b "Boxscore: American League 2, National League 1". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 12, 2009.
1947 Brooklyn Dodgers season

On April 15, Jackie Robinson was the opening day first baseman for the Brooklyn Dodgers, becoming the first black player in Major League Baseball. Robinson went on to bat .297, score 125 runs, steal 29 bases and be named the very first African-American Rookie of the Year. The Dodgers won the National League title and went on to lose to the New York Yankees in the 1947 World Series. This season was dramatized in the movie 42.

1948 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1948 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 15th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 13, 1948, at Sportsman's Park in St. Louis, Missouri, the home of both the St. Louis Browns of the American League (who were the designated host team) and the St. Louis Cardinals of the National League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 5–2.

Jim Boyer

James Murray Boyer (April 21, 1909 - July 25, 1959) was a Major League Baseball umpire who worked in the American League from 1944 to 1950. Boyer umpired in the 1947 World Series the 1947 Major League Baseball All-Star Game). In his career, he umpired 1,025 Major League games.

Spec Shea

Francis Joseph "Spec" Shea (October 2, 1920 – July 19, 2002) was a Major League Baseball pitcher from 1947–1955. He played for the New York Yankees from 1947–1951 and the Washington Senators from 1952–1955. He was known as "The Naugatuck Nugget" as a result of him being from Naugatuck, Connecticut, and was named as such by Yankees broadcaster Mel Allen, and was nicknamed "Spec" because of his freckles.Shea originally signed with the Yankees as an amateur free agent in 1940. He spent the 1940 season playing in Amsterdam, winning 11 and losing four while pitching 137 innings. In 1941, he was promoted to Norfolk, where he struck out 154 in 199 innings, and in 1942 he played in Kansas City, where he improved upon his earned run average. He was a member of the United States Military, serving in World War II. He joined in 1943 and served for three years, where he served solely as a soldier and did not play baseball.He was promoted to the Yankees' major league roster at the start of the 1947 New York Yankees season, and made his debut on April 19, 1947. He made his debut against the Boston Red Sox, which was so looked forward to at Naugatuck High School, his alma mater, that the school suspended operations for the day because most of the student body went to New York to root for Spec. As a rookie, Shea played in his first and only All-Star Game, playing in the 1947 Major League Baseball All-Star Game. In the game, Shea pitched the 4th, 5th, and 6th innings, relieving for Hal Newhouser. He allowed one earned run, and was declared the winning pitcher of the All-Star Game.The same year, MLB established the Rookie of the Year Award. In the middle of the season, however, Shea was sidelined for seven weeks due to a pulled neck muscle. Shea finished the season with a 14–5 record in 27 appearances, had the lowest hits allowed per nine innings pitched in the majors with 6.4, had the best win-loss record in the American League with .737%, threw 13 complete games, three shutouts, and had an ERA of 3.07. Shea was in the running for the Major League Baseball Rookie of the Year Award, which went to Jackie Robinson. Shea finished third in voting behind Robinson and Larry Jansen, but would have won the award had the American and National Leagues had separate Rookie of the Year winners. In the 1947 World Series, Shea started games one, five and seven, winning the first two en route to the Yankees' World Series victory.From 1948 to 1951, however, Shea had a combined 15-16 record, continuing to pitch in pain due to a nagging neck injury suffered in 1947. Instead of it being arm trouble as the Yankees believed, it was an issue that was solved by Shea visiting a chiropractor during the winter before the 1951 New York Yankees season. On May 3, 1952, Shea was traded by the Yankees with Jackie Jensen, Jerry Snyder, and Archie Wilson to the Washington Senators for Irv Noren and Tom Upton. In 1952 he had an 11–7 record with a 2.93 ERA, and in 1953 he had a 12–7 record with a 3.94 ERA. He was used in his final two seasons primarily as a relief pitcher, and pitched his final major league game on August 27, 1955.

Robert Redford called Shea during production of the film The Natural for pitching consultation, where he taught Redford how to pitch in an old-time style. Shea died in New Haven, Connecticut, on July 19, 2002 at the age of 81 after having heart valve replacement surgery.

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