1946 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1946 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 13th playing of the "Midsummer Classic" by Major League Baseball's (MLB) American League (AL) and National League (NL) All-Star teams.

The All-Star Game was held on July 9, 1946, at Fenway Park in Boston, Massachusetts the home of the AL's Boston Red Sox. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 12–0. This was the game when Ted Williams hit the only home run against Rip Sewell's famed "Eephus Pitch."[1]

1946 Major League Baseball All-Star Game
1946MLBAllStarGameLogo
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
National League 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
American League 2 0 0 1 3 0 2 4 X 12 14 1
DateJuly 9, 1946
VenueFenway Park
CityBoston, Massachusetts
Managers
Attendance34,906
RadioMutual
Radio announcersMel Allen and Jim Britt

Red Sox in the game

The Red Sox hosted the game and were well-represented. Red Sox infielders Bobby Doerr and Johnny Pesky, along with outfielders Ted Williams and Dom DiMaggio, were in the AL starting lineup, while pitchers Dave Ferriss and Mickey Harris along with first baseman Rudy York and catcher Hal Wagner were also named to the team (of the Red Sox' reserves, only York played in the game).

Starting lineups

Players in italics have since been inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

National League

American League

Umpires

Position Umpire League
Home Plate Bill Summers American
First Base Dusty Boggess National
Second Base Eddie Rommel American
Third Base Larry Goetz National

The umpires changed assignments in the middle of the fifth inning – Summers and Goetz swapped positions, also Boggess and Rommel swapped positions.[2]

Synopsis

Tuesday, July 9, 1946 1:30 pm (ET) at Fenway Park in Boston, Massachusetts
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
National League 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0
American League 2 0 0 1 3 0 2 4 X 12 14 1
WP: Bob Feller (1–0)   LP: Claude Passeau (0–1)   Sv: Jack Kramer (1)
Home runs:
NL: None
AL: Charlie Keller (1), Ted Williams (2)

The NL threatened in the top of the 1st inning, having two men on with one out, but were unable to score. The AL scored two runs in the bottom of the 1st, on a home run by Charlie Keller. There was then little activity until Ted Williams hit a home run in the bottom of the 4th, followed by the AL sending 9 men to the plate in the bottom of the 5th while scoring 3 runs. The AL later added 6 more runs, with the NL never threatening.

Ted Williams still (through 2016) holds five single-game All-Star Game Records, which were set in this game: hits (4), home runs (2), runs (4), RBI (5), and total bases (10).[3] Note that MLB did not name an All-Star Game MVP until 1962.

References

  1. ^ "Ted Williams paces AL to 12-0 All-Star win at Fenway". Boston Globe. July 10, 1946. Retrieved October 15, 2016.
  2. ^ "American League 12, National League 0". Retrosheet. July 9, 1946. Retrieved October 22, 2016.
  3. ^ "All-Star Game Records: Single All-Star Game Hitting Records". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved October 15, 2016.

External links

1945 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1945 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was cancelled on April 24 after the Major League Baseball (MLB) season began on April 17. The July 10 game was cancelled due to wartime travel restrictions in World War II. 1945 is the only year since 1933 when the first official All-Star Game was played, that an All-Star Game was cancelled and All-Stars were not officially selected.

This was to have been the 13th annual playing of the "Midsummer Classic" by MLB's American League (AL) and National League (NL) All-Star teams. The game was to be played at Fenway Park, home of the AL's Boston Red Sox. Fenway Park was chosen for the 1946 Major League Baseball All-Star Game (13th "Midsummer Classic") which was played on July 9 of that year.

On July 9 and 10, 1945, seven out of eight scheduled interleague night games were advertised and played as "All-Star" games in place of the official All-Star Game during the three-day All-Star break to help support the American Red Cross and the National War Fund. Four of the exhibition games were played on July 10 in Washington, D.C., St. Louis, Philadelphia, and Boston.

Germany had surrendered in May 1945. Mike Todd, a Broadway producer, had passed on the idea of holding the 1945 All-Star Game in Nuremberg, Germany, at a stadium renamed "Soldier Field" where U.S. Troops stationed in the European Theater played baseball. Although baseball's new commissioner, Happy Chandler was reportedly "intrigued" by the idea, it was ultimately dismissed as impractical by military advisors.

1946 Brooklyn Dodgers season

The 1946 Brooklyn Dodgers finished the season tied for first place with the St. Louis Cardinals. The two teams played in the first ever playoff series to decide the pennant, and the Cardinals took two straight to win the title.

With their star players back from the war, Brooklyn had jumped back into serious contention. They would be respectable until their move to Los Angeles 10 years later.

This season was the team's – and Major League Baseball's – last non-integrated one.

1947 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1947 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 14th playing of the "Midsummer Classic" between Major League Baseball's (MLB) American League (AL) and National League (NL) All-Star teams. The All-Star Game was held on July 8, 1947, at Wrigley Field in Chicago, the home of the NL's Chicago Cubs.

The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League by a score of 2–1 in 2 hours and 19 minutes.

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