1946–47 NHL season

The 1946–47 NHL season was the 30th season of the National Hockey League. The Toronto Maple Leafs defeated the Montreal Canadiens in the 1947 Stanley Cup Final to win their sixth Stanley Cup championship.

1946–47 NHL season
LeagueNational Hockey League
SportIce hockey
DurationOctober 16, 1946 – April 19, 1947
Number of games60
Number of teams6
Regular season
Season championMontreal Canadiens
Season MVPMaurice Richard (Canadiens)
Top scorerMax Bentley (Black Hawks)
Stanley Cup
ChampionsToronto Maple Leafs
  Runners-upMontreal Canadiens

League business

Tommy Gorman, who had been associated with the National Hockey League since its inception in 1917, announced his retirement in July 1946 as general manager of the Montreal Canadiens. He left behind him seven Stanley Cup champions and a hall of fame career as a coach and general manager. Frank Selke, released from the Toronto Maple Leafs, took over as general manager and would build the greatest dynasty hockey ever knew in the late 1950s. The Canadiens were in financial trouble at this time, despite their winning team and Selke would turn things around by buying up talent and keeping the cream of the crop, selling some players to teams that needed talent.

Red Dutton finally got to resign as president of the NHL, as Clarence Campbell, whom Frank Calder had been grooming as his successor, had come home from Europe. Campbell's experience in law and in hockey made him an ideal choice as president. Campbell hired Ken McKenzie, who would become the league's first publicity director, in September 1946, as his first hiring. McKenzie would go on to found The Hockey News and other publications, including the annual NHL Guide.[1]

Lorne Chabot, whose outstanding career as goalkeeper brought him two Stanley Cups, a Vezina Trophy and a first all-star selection, died October 10, five days after his 46th birthday. He had been suffering from kidney disease for some time and had been bedridden with severe arthritis.

Changes

The league extended the season from 50 games to 60 games. Linesmen are to be hired for each game from neutral cities. The system of hand gestures to symbolize penalties, devised by Bill Chadwick, is adopted officially by the NHL. The NHL announces that winners of its trophies, and members of the All-Star team will each receive $1,000.[2] Additionally, the league modified the captaincy rule so that captains wore the letter "C" and assistant captains wear the letter "A" on the front of their jerseys.[3]

Regular season

Detroit lost Syd Howe through retirement, but another Howe started his great career as Gordie Howe was Detroit's new rookie. In one of his first fights, he took care of Montreal's Rocket Richard. Sid Abel then added a taunt that enraged Richard and he broke Abel's nose in three places.

Chicago decided to purchase goaltender Paul Bibeault from Montreal and regretted it. He played badly, one of his losses being an 11–0 whitewashing at the hands of Toronto. Finally, president and general manager Bill Tobin had enough and brought up 20-year-old Emile Francis to replace him. He made his debut on February 9, 1947, in a 6–4 win over Boston. During the season, Maple Leaf Gardens was the first arena in the NHL to have Plexiglas inserted in the end zones of the rink.[4]

A donnybrook took place March 16, 1947, between the New York Rangers and Montreal Canadiens. Cal Gardner lifted Kenny Reardon's stick so that it clipped him in the mouth and a fight broke out between both teams and the fans. On that same night, Billy Taylor of Detroit set an NHL record with 7 assists in a 10–6 shootout win over the Chicago Black Hawks.

Bill Durnan broke George Hainsworth's record of consecutive Vezina Trophies as he won his fourth in a row, and Montreal again finished first. Max Bentley edged out Rocket Richard by one point and won the scoring championship. On February 12, 1947, Dit Clapper played his final game with the Boston Bruins. Before the start of the game, Clapper was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame. He was the only active player to be inducted into the Hall.[5] The New York Rangers were the first NHL team to have their home games televised.

Final standings

National Hockey League[6]
GP W L T GF GA DIFF Pts
1 Montreal Canadiens 60 34 16 10 189 138 +51 78
2 Toronto Maple Leafs 60 31 19 10 209 172 +37 72
3 Boston Bruins 60 26 23 11 190 175 +15 63
4 Detroit Red Wings 60 22 27 11 190 193 −3 55
5 New York Rangers 60 22 32 6 167 186 −19 50
6 Chicago Black Hawks 60 19 37 4 193 274 −81 42

Playoffs

Playoff bracket

Semifinals Stanley Cup Finals
      
1 Montreal 4
3 Boston 1
1 Montreal 2
2 Toronto 4
2 Toronto 4
4 Detroit 1

Semifinals

(1) Montreal Canadiens vs. (3) Boston Bruins

Montreal won series 4–1

(2) Toronto Maple Leafs vs. (4) Detroit Red Wings

Toronto won series 4–1

Stanley Cup Finals

Toronto won series 4–2

Awards

Award winners
O'Brien Cup:
(Playoff runner-up)
Montreal Canadiens
Prince of Wales Trophy:
(Best regular season record)
Montreal Canadiens
Calder Memorial Trophy:
(Best first-year player)
Howie Meeker, Toronto Maple Leafs
Hart Trophy:
(Most valuable player)
Maurice Richard, Montreal Canadiens
Lady Byng Trophy:
(Excellence and sportsmanship)
Bobby Bauer, Boston Bruins
Vezina Trophy:
(Goaltender of team with lowest GAA)
Bill Durnan, Montreal Canadiens
All-Star teams
First team   Position   Second team
Bill Durnan, Montreal Canadiens G Frank Brimsek, Boston Bruins
Ken Reardon, Montreal Canadiens D Jack Stewart, Detroit Red Wings
Emile "Butch" Bouchard, Montreal Canadiens D Bill Quackenbush, Detroit Red Wings
Milt Schmidt, Boston Bruins C Max Bentley, Chicago Black Hawks
Maurice Richard, Montreal Canadiens RW Bobby Bauer, Boston Bruins
Doug Bentley, Chicago Black Hawks LW Woody Dumart, Boston Bruins

Player statistics

Scoring leaders

Note: GP = Games played, G = Goals, A = Assists, PTS = Points, PIM = Penalties in minutes

Player Team GP G A Pts PIM
Max Bentley Chicago Black Hawks 60 29 43 72 12
Maurice Richard Montreal Canadiens 60 45 26 71 69
Billy Taylor Detroit Red Wings 60 17 46 63 35
Milt Schmidt Boston Bruins 59 27 35 62 40
Ted Kennedy Toronto Maple Leafs 60 28 32 60 27
Doug Bentley Chicago Black Hawks 52 21 34 55 18
Bobby Bauer Boston Bruins 58 30 24 54 4
Roy Conacher Detroit Red Wings 60 30 24 54 6
Bill Mosienko Chicago Black Hawks 59 25 27 52 2
Woody Dumart Boston Bruins 60 24 28 52 12

Source: NHL[7]

Leading goaltenders

Note: GP = Games played; Mins – Minutes Played; GA = Goals Against; GAA = Goals Against Average; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; SO = Shutouts

Player Team GP Mins GA GAA W L T SO
Bill Durnan Montreal Canadiens 60 3600 138 2.30 34 16 10 4
Turk Broda Toronto Maple Leafs 60 3600 172 2.87 31 19 10 4
Frank Brimsek Boston Bruins 60 3600 175 2.92 26 23 11 3
Chuck Rayner New York Rangers 58 3480 177 3.05 22 30 6 5
Harry Lumley Detroit Red Wings 52 3120 159 3.06 22 20 10 3
Paul Bibeault Chicago Black Hawks 41 2460 170 4.15 13 25 3 1
Emile Francis Chicago Black Hawks 19 1140 104 5.47 6 12 1 0

Coaches

Debuts

The following is a list of players of note who played their first NHL game in 1946–47 (listed with their first team, asterisk(*) marks debut in playoffs):

Last games

The following is a list of players of note that played their last game in the NHL in 1946–47 (listed with their last team):

See also

References

  • Diamond, Dan, ed. (1994). Years of glory, 1942–1967: the National Hockey League's official book of the six-team era. Toronto, ON: McClelland and Stewart. ISBN 0-7710-2817-2.
  • Diamond, Dan, ed. (2000). Total Hockey. Total Sports. ISBN 1-892129-85-X.
  • Dinger, Ralph, ed. (2011). The National Hockey League Official Guide & Record Book 2012. Toronto, ON: Dan Diamond & Associates. ISBN 978-1-894801-22-5.
  • Dryden, Steve, ed. (2000). Century of hockey. Toronto, ON: McClelland & Stewart Ltd. ISBN 0-7710-4179-9.
  • Duplacey, James (1996). Diamond, Dan (ed.). The annotated rules of hockey. Lyons & Burford. ISBN 1-55821-466-6.
  • Fischler, Stan; Fischler, Shirley; Hughes, Morgan; Romain, Joseph; Duplacey, James (2003). The Hockey Chronicle: Year-by-Year History of the National Hockey League. Lincolnwood, IL: Publications International Inc. ISBN 0-7853-9624-1.
  • McFarlane, Brian (1973). The Story of the National Hockey League. New York, NY: Pagurian Press. ISBN 0-684-13424-1.
Notes
  1. ^ "McKenzie Leaves NHL". Montreal Gazette. June 13, 1963. p. 38.
  2. ^ Fischler et al., p. 172.
  3. ^ Duplacey 1996, p. 24.
  4. ^ Hockey's Book of Firsts, p.66, James Duplacey, JG Press, ISBN 978-1-57215-037-9
  5. ^ Hockey's Book of Firsts, p.25, James Duplacey, JG Press, ISBN 978-1-57215-037-9
  6. ^ "1946–1947 Division Standings Standings - NHL.com - Standings". National Hockey League.
  7. ^ Dinger 2011, p. 148.

External links

1937–38 Montreal Maroons season

The 1937–38 Montreal Maroons season was the 14th and last season of the Montreal Maroons. The team finished in last place in the Canadian Division. The team and franchise was dissolved after the season.

1946–47 Boston Bruins season

The 1946–47 Boston Bruins season was the Bruins' 23rd season in the NHL.

1946–47 Chicago Black Hawks season

The 1946–47 Chicago Black Hawks season was the team's 21st season in the National Hockey League, and they were coming off a 3rd place regular season finish in 1945–46, followed by being swept by the Montreal Canadiens in the first round of the playoffs.

The Black Hawks would struggle all season long in 1946–47, allowing a league high 274 goals, which was 81 goals higher than the next closest team. The team had the 2nd highest offense in the league though, scoring 193 goals. Despite the NHL raising its schedule length to 60 games, the Hawks would not even be close to reaching its point total from the previous season, earning a league low 42 points, and finishing 13 points out of a playoff spot.

Offensively, the Hawks were led by Max Bentley, who led the NHL in points with 72, and he led the Black Hawks with 29 goals and 43 assists. Doug Bentley would earn 55 points, while Bill Mosienko would score 25 goals and 52 points. Alex Kaleta (24), team captain Red Hamill (21), and Hully Gee (20) would all reach the 20 goal plateau. On defense, teenager Bill Gadsby would lead the team with 18 points, while John Mariucci would set a team record for penalty minutes in a season, with 110.

In goal, the Hawks acquired Paul Bibeault from the Montreal Canadiens, and he would lead the team with 13 wins, and had a 4.15 GAA, along with a shutout. Emile Francis would also get some playing time, earning 6 wins, while posting a 5.47 GAA.

1946–47 Detroit Red Wings season

The 1946–47 Detroit Red Wings season was the Red Wings' 21st season. The season involved Gordie Howe making his National Hockey League debut.

1946–47 Montreal Canadiens season

The 1946–47 Montreal Canadiens season was the 38th season in club history. The team placed first in the regular season to qualify for the playoffs. The Canadiens lost in the Stanley Cup finals against the Toronto Maple Leafs four games to two.

1946–47 New York Rangers season

The 1946–47 New York Rangers season was the 21st season for the team in the National Hockey League (NHL). The Rangers compiled a 22–32–6 record in the regular season and finished with 50 points. The team's fifth-place finish caused it to miss the NHL playoffs.

1946–47 Toronto Maple Leafs season

The 1946–47 Toronto Maple Leafs season involved winning the Stanley Cup. During the season, Maple Leaf Gardens was the first arena in the NHL to have Plexiglas inserted in the end zones of the rink.

1947 Stanley Cup Finals

The 1947 Stanley Cup Finals was a best-of-seven series between the Toronto Maple Leafs and the defending champion Montreal Canadiens. The Maple Leafs would win the series four games to two. This was the first all-Canadian finals since 1935, when the since-folded Montreal Maroons defeated the Maple Leafs.

Bill Juzda

William Juzda (October 29, 1920 – February 17, 2008) was a Canadian professional ice hockey Defenceman from Winnipeg, Manitoba. He played with the Toronto Maple Leafs and New York Rangers of the National Hockey League (NHL) and won two Stanley Cups with the Leafs in 1949 and 1951. Not a prolific goal scorer, Juzda built a reputation as one of hockey's hardest hitters.

Edgar Laprade

Edgar Louis "Beaver" Laprade (October 10, 1919 – April 28, 2014) was a Canadian professional ice hockey centre who played for the New York Rangers in the National Hockey League. The son of Thomas and Edith Laprade, he was born in the New Ontario community of Mine Centre. By age 4, he and his family moved to Port Arthur, Ontario. He also spent time with the Port Arthur Bearcats of the Thunder Bay Senior Hockey League.

Frank Brimsek

Francis Charles "Mr. Zero" Brimsek (September 26, 1915 – November 11, 1998) was an American professional ice hockey goaltender who played ten seasons in the National Hockey League (NHL) for the Boston Bruins and Chicago Black Hawks. He won the Calder Memorial Trophy and the Vezina Trophy twice, and he was named to the NHL All-Star Team eight times (twice on the First Team and six times on the Second Team). He was also a member of two Stanley Cup championships (1939 and 1941). At the time of his retirement in 1950, he held the records for most wins and shutouts recorded by an American goaltender; these records stood for 54 years and 61 years respectively. In 1966, he was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame, the first American goalie to be inducted; and in 1973, he was part of the inaugural class of the United States Hockey Hall of Fame. In 1998, Brimsek was ranked number 67 on The Hockey News' list of the 100 Greatest Hockey Players, the highest ranked American goaltender.

George Allen (ice hockey)

George Trenholm Allen (July 27, 1914 – March 27, 2000) was a Canadian professional ice hockey player who played Left Wing in the National Hockey League, mostly for the Chicago Black Hawks.

Harry Bell (ice hockey)

Herbert Botley "Harry" Bell (October 31, 1925 – August 27, 2009) was a Canadian professional ice hockey defenceman who played in one National Hockey League game for the New York Rangers during the 1946–47 NHL season.

History of the Toronto Maple Leafs

The history of the Toronto Maple Leafs National Hockey League (NHL) team spans more than a century. The Maple Leafs and the NHL arose from disputes between Eddie Livingstone, owner of the National Hockey Association's Toronto Blueshirts, and the other owners of the Association. In November 1917, the Toronto Arena Company was granted a temporary franchise from the NHL, a new ice hockey league made up of the other NHA owners that had disputes with Livingstone. The franchise was later made permanent by the NHL in October 1918. Playing at Arena Gardens, the Toronto Arenas won the 1918 Stanley Cup Finals following the inaugural 1917–18 NHL season.

In 1919, the club was sold to the St. Patrick Hockey Club. Under new ownership, the club was renamed the Toronto St. Patricks. Although the St. Patricks won one Stanley Cup, in 1922, the club was again put up for sale due following a series of litigations from Livingstone. The club was eventually sold to Conn Smythe in 1927, who immediately renamed the team to the Toronto Maple Leaf Hockey Club. In an effort to finance the construction of Maple Leaf Gardens, Smythe launched Maple Leaf Gardens Limited (MLGL, later renamed Maple Leafs Sports & Entertainment in 1998), a publicly traded management company to own both the Maple Leafs and the planned arena. The Maple Leafs played their first game at Maple Leaf Gardens in November, 1931. For most of the 1930s, the team was led by The Kid Line. The line led the Maple Leafs to win the 1932 Stanley Cup, as well as four more Stanley Cup appearances in the following six years.

As a result of the Great Depression, a number of NHL franchises financially struggled, suspended operations and folded. By the 1942–43 NHL season, the Maple Leafs were one of six remaining members in the NHL. The Maple Leafs saw tremendous success during the "Original Six-era" (from the 1942–43 to the 1966–67 season), winning the Stanley Cup in 1942, 1945, 1947, 1948, and 1949. Following the Maple Leafs 1951 Stanley Cup victory, the team saw an 11-year championship drought. Prior to the 1961–62 NHL season, Conn Smythe sold nearly all of his shares in MLGL to a partnership made up of his son, Stafford Smythe, John Bassett, and Harold Ballard. The Maple Leafs found new success during the 1960s, winning the Stanley Cup in 1962, 1963, 1964, and 1967. Winning their last championship in Centennial Year prior to the 1967 NHL expansion, the Maple Leafs' drought between Stanley Cups is the longest active drought in the NHL.

In 1971, Ballard secured principal ownership of MLGL. During the 1970s, the Maple Leafs saw some success, only failing to qualify for the playoffs once in the decade. However, the Maple Leafs would fail to post a winning record for 12 years, from 1980–81 to 1992–93. During the 1990s and early 2000s, the team saw a resurgence in competitive play, missing the playoffs only twice from 1993 to 2004. In February 1999, the Maple Leafs moved from Maple Leaf Gardens, to their new home arena, the Air Canada Centre. Following the 2004–05 NHL lockout, the Maple Leafs saw an seven-year playoff drought, failing to qualify for the playoffs from the 2006 to 2013 Stanley Cup playoffs. In August 2012, BCE Inc. and Rogers Communications completed the purchase for a combined 70 percent stake in MLSE. Shortly after the end of the 2013–14 season, Brendan Shanahan was appointed the president and alternate governor of the hockey club.

Maple Leaf Gardens

Maple Leaf Gardens is a historic building located at the northwest corner of Carlton Street and Church Street in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The building was initially constructed as an arena to host ice hockey games, but has since been reconstructed for other uses. Today, Maple Leaf Gardens is a multi-purpose facility, with Loblaws occupying retail space on the lower floors and an arena for Toronto's Ryerson University, known as Mattamy Athletic Centre at the Gardens, occupying the top level.Considered one of the "cathedrals" of ice hockey, it was home to the Toronto Maple Leafs of the National Hockey League from 1931 to 1999. The Leafs won the Stanley Cup 11 times from 1932 to 1967 while playing at the Gardens. The first NHL All-Star Game, albeit an unofficial one, was held at the Gardens in 1934 as a benefit for Leafs forward Ace Bailey, who had suffered a career-ending head injury. The first official annual National Hockey League All-Star Game was also held at Maple Leaf Gardens in 1947.

It was home to the Toronto Huskies (1946–1947) in their single season in the Basketball Association of America (a forerunner of the National Basketball Association), the Toronto Marlboros of the Ontario Hockey League, the Toronto Toros of the World Hockey Association (1974–1976), the Toronto Blizzard of the North American Soccer League (1980–1982 indoor seasons), the Toronto Shooting Stars of the National Professional Soccer League (1996–1997), and the Toronto Rock of the National Lacrosse League (1999–2000). The NBA's Buffalo Braves played a total of 16 regular season games at Maple Leaf Gardens from 1971 to 1975. The NBA's Toronto Raptors played six games at the Gardens from 1997 to 1999, mostly when SkyDome was unavailable.

It was also one of the few venues outside the United States where Elvis Presley performed in concert (April 2, 1957). In 1972, Maple Leaf Gardens hosted game 2 of the famous Summit Series between Team Canada and the USSR. Team Canada won the game 4–1.

Melvin Read

Melvin Dean "Mel, Pee Wee" Read (April 10, 1922 – July 9, 2005) was a Canadian professional ice hockey centre who played in six National Hockey League games for the New York Rangers during the 1946–47 NHL season.

Punch line (ice hockey)

The Punch line was a famous ice hockey line for the Montreal Canadiens in the 1940s. It consisted of Elmer Lach at center, Toe Blake on left wing, and Maurice Richard on the right side.

During their time together, they led the Canadiens to two Stanley Cup victories. During the 1944–45 NHL season, the three finished first (Lach), second (Richard), and third (Blake) in scoring for the league. They would also form the forward line for the first all-star team in that same season. Richard would be the first team all-star right wing for all but one year while with Blake and Lach.

Ted Kennedy (ice hockey)

Theodore Samuel "Teeder" Kennedy (December 12, 1925 – August 14, 2009) was a professional ice hockey centre who played his entire career with the Toronto Maple Leafs from 1943 to 1957 and was captain for eight seasons. Along with Turk Broda, he was the first player in NHL history to win five Stanley Cups, and he was the last Maple Leaf to win the Hart Trophy for most valuable player. He was an essential contributor to the Maple Leafs becoming what many consider as the National Hockey League's first dynasty. He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1966. He has been called the quintessential Maple Leaf and by some the greatest player in the team's history. In 2017 Kennedy was named one of the '100 Greatest NHL Players' in history.Kennedy was raised in the small Ontario town of Humberstone, now Port Colborne. Kennedy was born just eleven days after his father was killed in a hunting accident. His mother, left alone to raise four children, took a job at the local hockey arena which became Kennedy's second home. After a stellar junior hockey career, Kennedy first came to the attention of the Montreal Canadiens and attended their training camp while still in high school. However, after some disappointing experiences with Montreal management he signed shortly afterward with the Maple Leafs.

Although young, Kennedy was successful with Toronto from the start. In his first season, the 18-year-old finished second on the team in scoring and then in his sophomore year was considered the star of Toronto's upset of the record-breaking Montreal Canadiens of 1944–45. He established himself as the leader of the team and became captain in 1948. Although not the best skater in the league, Kennedy was a fierce forechecker and skilled playmaker. Kennedy was a perfect fit into coach Hap Day's emphasis on defense and positional play. He gained a reputation for scoring the important goal and excelling in the playoffs. Kennedy holds the Toronto Maple Leafs' all-time record for career points in the Stanley Cup Finals and is the youngest player in the history of the NHL to have scored a Stanley Cup winning goal. A Sports Illustrated poll of hockey experts in 1998 rated Kennedy as having the best face-off skills in the history of the NHL.

March 25 Boston Bruins 1–3 Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
Ken Smith (1) – 02:30 First period 05:58 – Toe Blake (1)
No scoring Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period 12:30 – Jimmy Peters (1)
16:27 – John Quilty (1)
Frank Brimsek Goalie stats Bill Durnan
March 27 Boston Bruins 1–2 OT Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
Bobby Bauer (1) – 03:02 Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period 19:08 – Ken Reardon (1)
No scoring First overtime period 05:38 – Ken Mosdell (1)
Frank Brimsek Goalie stats Bill Durnan
March 29 Montreal Canadiens 2–4 Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
Maurice Richard (1) – 00:38
Ken Mosdell (2) – 05:28
First period No scoring
No scoring Second period 10:45 – Milt Schmidt (1)
12:32 – Joe Carveth (1)
15:30 – Milt Schmidt (2)
No scoring Third period 14:48 – Woody Dumart (1)
Bill Durnan Goalie stats Frank Brimsek
April 1 Montreal Canadiens 5–1 Boston Bruins Boston Garden Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
Billy Reay (1) – 05:04
John Quilty (2) – 06:31
Billy Reay (2) – 10:38
Second period 16:20 – Ken Smith (2)
Billy Reay (3) – 03:55
Billy Reay (4) – pp – 18:39
Third period No scoring
Bill Durnan Goalie stats Frank Brimsek
April 3 Boston Bruins 3–4 2OT Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
Joe Carveth (2) – 13:52
Milt Schmidt (3) – 14:14
Second period 00:45 – ppToe Blake (2)
Ken Smith (3) – 11:40 Third period 07:43 – Maurice Richard (2)
17:55 – Maurice Richard (3)
No scoring Second overtime period 16:40 – John Quilty (3)
Frank Brimsek Goalie stats Bill Durnan
March 26 Detroit Red Wings 2–3 OT Toronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
No scoring First period No scoring
Roy Conacher (1) – 02:21 Second period 07:01 – ppVic Lynn (1)
Pete Horeck (1) – 16:25 Third period 10:29 – Nick Metz (1)
No scoring First overtime period 03:05 – Howie Meeker (1)
Red Almas Goalie stats Turk Broda
March 29 Detroit Red Wings 9–1 Toronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
Ted Lindsay (1) – pp – 03:20
Sid Abel (1) – pp – 04:20
First period No scoring
Billy Taylor (1) – 02:10 Second period 09:56 – Nick Metz (2)
Ted Lindsay (2) – 05:26
Roy Conacher (2) – 07:57
Pete Horeck (2) – 13:37
Jim Conacher (1) – 17:30
Roy Conacher (3) – 18:30
Eddie Bruneteau (1) – 19:00
Third period No scoring
Red Almas Goalie stats Turk Broda
April 1 Toronto Maple Leafs 4–1 Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
Don Metz (1) – 12:41 First period No scoring
Harry Watson (1) – pp – 16:46 Second period 07:51 – ppJim Conacher (2)
Syl Apps (1) – 02:30
Syl Apps (2) – 16:20
Third period No scoring
Turk Broda Goalie stats Red Almas
April 3 Toronto Maple Leafs 4–1 Detroit Red Wings Olympia Stadium Recap  
Howie Meeker (2) – 15:51 First period No scoring
Ted Kennedy (1) – 13:13 Second period 06:18 – pp' – Roy Conacher (4)
Howie Meeker (3) – 09:11
Syl Apps (3) – 10:59
Third period No scoring
Turk Broda Goalie stats Red Almas
April 5 Detroit Red Wings 1–6 Toronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
Fern Gauthier (1) – sh – 17:51 First period 11:52 – shNick Metz (3)
16:00 – shJoe Klukay (1)
No scoring Second period 04:40 – ppDon Metz (2)
13:16 – Gaye Stewart (1)
No scoring Third period 08:22 – pp – Nick Metz (4)
14:37 – Syl Apps (4)
Red Almas Goalie stats Turk Broda
April 8 Toronto Maple Leafs 0–6 Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
No scoring First period 02:20 – ppBuddy O'Connor (1)
No scoring Second period 08:17 – ppBilly Reay (5)
09:41 – Maurice Richard (4)
No scoring Third period 05:40 – George Allen (1)
11:04 – Billy Reay (6)
18:28 – Murph Chamberlain (1)
Turk Broda Goalie stats Bill Durnan
April 10 Toronto Maple Leafs 4–0 Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
Ted Kennedy (2) – pp – 01:12
Vic Lynn (2) – pp – 01:36
First period No scoring
Gaye Stewart (2) – pp – 06:37 Second period No scoring
Harry Watson (2) – pp – 11:55 Third period No scoring
Turk Broda Goalie stats Bill Durnan
April 12 Montreal Canadiens 2–4 Toronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
No scoring First period 09:45 – Gus Mortson (1)
Leo Gravelle (1) – 12:33
Buddy O'Connor (2) – 18:30
Second period 04:48 – ppBud Poile (1)
12:23 – Vic Lynn (3)
No scoring Third period 19:13 – Ted Kennedy (3)
Bill Durnan Goalie stats Turk Broda
April 15 Montreal Canadiens 1–2 OT Toronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
Glen Harmon (1) – pp – 04:38 First period 06:13 – Harry Watson (3)
No scoring Second period No scoring
No scoring Third period No scoring
No scoring First overtime period 16:36 – Syl Apps (5)
Bill Durnan Goalie stats Turk Broda
April 17 Toronto Maple Leafs 1–3 Montreal Canadiens Montreal Forum Recap  
No scoring First period 01:23 – Maurice Richard (5)
08:29 – Leo Gravelle (2)
No scoring Second period 19:32 – pp – Maurice Richard (6)
Bud Poile (2) – 13:37 Third period No scoring
Turk Broda Goalie stats Bill Durnan
April 19 Montreal Canadiens 1–2 Toronto Maple Leafs Maple Leaf Gardens Recap  
Buddy O'Connor (3) – 00:25 First period No scoring
No scoring Second period 05:39 – Vic Lynn (4)
No scoring Third period 14:39 – Ted Kennedy (4)
Bill Durnan Goalie stats Turk Broda
1946–47 NHL season
Teams
See also
1910s
1920s
1930s
1940s
1950s
1960s
1970s
1980s
1990s
2000s
2010s

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